TAKE ACTION: Mormon Leader Chooses Homophobia When Compassion is Needed

Many of us are familiar with the struggle that so many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender teens face. Anti-LGBT bullying in schools is out of control and has led to a number of recent teen suicides.

Yet a top Mormon Church apostle has chosen this precise moment to broadcast a message of intolerance to millions.

Boyd K. Packer, the second-highest Mormon leader, said same-sex attraction is “impure and unnatural” and can be overcome, and that same-sex unions are morally wrong and “against God’s law and nature.”

Please add your name to our open letter showing the Mormon Church hierarchy that it has risked further alienating vulnerable LGBT youth with potentially devastating consequences – and after you sign the letter, please post it on Facebook and share it with your friends so people everywhere know that these views are scientifically wrong and misguided.

Never was there a time where compassion was needed more, but instead Mr. Packer chose to use his twice-a-year address to spew anti-LGBT remarks.  The kids deserve better.

View the email and add your name to the petition here.


Human Rights Campaign | HRC Back Story

—  John Wright

Mormon Leader Rips “Immoral” Gays

So much for that LDS make-over.

(Via – Good As You)

Joe. My. God.

—  John Wright

Now that several gay kids are dead, Mormon leader suddenly chooses to mouth off in anti-gay tirade

A gay kid just killed himself. Several in fact. And this bigoted piece of scum thought it was a good time to deliver yet another anti-gay tirade. (Did he even bother mentioning the suicides? Even that witch Maggie Gallagher felt the need to at least mention the kids, before going on to defend her hate.)

These are the bigots who took away our right to marry in California.  Who tell our children that they don’t deserve to love or be loved.  That God would never want us to be gay.  It’s bigots like this who are responsible for our children thinking they have no option other than suicide.

Boyd K. Packer, president of the Mormon “Quorum of Twelve Apostles”:

“There are those today who not only tolerate but advocate voting to change laws that would legalize immorality, as if a vote would somehow alter the designs of God’s laws and nature,” Boyd K. Packer, president of the church’s Quorum of Twelve Apostles, said in a strongly worded sermon about the dangers of pornography and same-sex marriage. “A law against nature would be impossible to enforce. Do you think a vote to repeal the law of gravity would do any good?”

Good one! By the way, what does nature say about polygamy?

[T]he power to create offspring “is not an incidental part of the plan of happiness. It is the key — the very key.” Some argue that attraction that is “impure and unnatural” is “pre-set and cannot [be] overcome, Packer said. “Not so! Why would our Heavenly Father do that to anyone? Remember he is our father.” Alluding to the Utah-based church’s support of laws such as California’s Proposition 8 that would define marriage as exclusively between a man and a woman, Packer said, “Regardless of the opposition, we are determined to stay on course.” “We cannot change; we will not change,” the senior apostle declared unequivocally.

Good.  Because it will be a pleasure to continue exposing how hateful and bigoted Mormons really are, and how they won’t be appeased until they force every American to live as Mormons.  It’s the reason they tried to steal Ann Frank’s soul. It’s the reason they had the audacity to baptize Obama’s own mother into Mormonism without his consent.

As Dan Savage has explained all too well, bigotry like this helps convince gay kids to kill themselves.  People who tell them that God would never have made them this way. People who tell them that they’re immoral, that they’re sick, that they don’t deserve to love or be loved.

I know the Mormons like to think of themselves as Christians (well, Christians who believe that Jesus had sex with Mary).  But if they really want people to believe that they’re Christian, maybe they should start acting like one.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

‘The Twilight Saga: Eclipse’ targets the gay community … even though its Mormon creator favors anti-gay author

Two things — well, three really — about the new Twilight Saga entry, Eclipse. First, my review will be in the paper this week, so look for it. That’s kinda the third thing.

Second, when perusing the press site for the film, I came upon these two photos. Look carefully at Taylor; now look at Robert; they are actually the same picture, taken from a scene from the film. The only difference — other than the fact that, once you look closely, you can see how it was Photoshopped — is that in one, the girl is missing. Now, she’s in the scene in the movie. So the question is, why was she removed from the photo?

And the answer, according to one person in my office, is clearly: To appeal to the gay community.

Certainly it is convenient for the studio to streamline all the beefcake in one two-shot and omit the woman — which, when I think about it, is probably the only reason most girls go to see these films. (Who likes Bella, anyway?) But I think gay guys want it all conveniently tied up without female distractions, too. And the producers know it.

They also seem to know it insofar as the two directors in competition to helm the adaptations of the last book in the series were gays Gus Van Sant and Bill Condon (Condon got it). But deep down, it’s hard not to feel exploited by the creator.

Which brings us to point No. 3: The author of the books, Stephenie Meyer, is a devout Mormon who had never written so much as a letter to the editor before she became fabulously wealthy with her Twilight series. Some have analyzed the books through the prism of the LDS church, noting the virginal heroine and Edward’s insistence on marriage are conservative religious principals. Meyer has denied it.

What she hasn’t denied is being a fan of Mormon sci-fi author Orson Scott Card. Card is a virulently anti-gay bigot (which, if you saw the documentary 8: The Mormon Proposition, is par for the course for that cult). Last year, he joined the board of the anti-gay National Organization for Marriage and has said no one can claim to be gay and a Mormon.

Now, I see these movies for free as part of my job (plus I have a well-documented crush on Taylor Lautner). But it makes you wonder: Does Meyer agree with Card’s view on homosexuality? Does she have as much contempt for her gay fans as Card seems to?

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

XL laughs

Plus-sized comedian Ryan O’Connor doesn’t shy away from fat jokes

STEVEN LINDSEY | Contributing Writer stevencraiglindsey@me.com


EAT THAT | The chubby gay boy, center, gets his revenge by turning his life into a humorous cabaret in ‘Ryan O’Connor Eats His Feelings.’

RYAN O’CONNOR EATS
Greenville Center for the Arts, 5601 Sears St.
June 23 at 8 p.m. $15.
ContemporaryTheatreofDallas.com







Don’t call Ryan O’Connor a standup comic. Sure, he’s funny, he stands onstage in front of a microphone and people laugh, but his show is more than that.
The former actor and talk-show character player recently embarked on his first tour (complete with a rented Minivan) and took time out hours before the debut performance in San Francisco to talk about his career, his show and the foods that make him happy. His current boyfriend is Mormon, three of his exes have gone off to marry women and he’s not above smuggling dogs into hotel rooms. How could he not be a comic?

………………………..

Dallas Voice: So when did you first start doing comedy — or rather, getting paid for doing comedy? Ryan O’Connor: My first paid comedy gig was with Second City in New York. We formed an improv group out of that called the Birdwatchers. There were eight of us and we got a split of the door, so we got about 20 bucks.

How is being a comedian different from being an actor? It’s been an evolution. In a lot of ways I fought being a comedian because there’s a lot of fear involved in it. Even describing myself as a comedian right now feels ambitious. I consider myself more a storyteller, and I tend to tell funny stories. But I’ve come to terms with the fact that people would like me to call myself a comedian, so I’ll oblige.

People like labels. Exactly. But even when you’re doing cabaret, you’re still one man standing in front of a microphone. I’m a cabaret artist, which I sometimes describe as singing standup. You will never catch me at a standup open mike; you will never catch me going on after a standup performer. It’s just way too terrifying for me. Even though it’s not that much different than what I do, in my brain, it’s terrifying.

You sing a lot in your show. Is the singing your security blanket? Yeah, kind of. It’s not even that I have the world’s most terrific voice. It’s just that I’m comfortable.

Musical theater is what I grew up in. It’s what I’ve known my entire life. It gives me security knowing that if a story bombs, I have a song I can go into and songs are easier to sell than comedy. Even funny songs, it’s at least written into the music. This sounds like the most defensive interview of all time!

I’m sorry. No it’s me, not you!

Your publicity describes you as the “big gay singing Kathy Griffin.” Do you think she’s worried about you stealing her gays? Kathy’s a friend of mine. I got her blessing to refer to myself as the big gay singing Kathy Griffin. I don’t think Kathy sees anyone as a threat any more. In the last couple of years she’s finally getting the acclaim she’s deserved forever.

I’m sure she loves the label — it gets her name out there more. It’s only fair, too, because I’ve been in her act before. She used to refer to me in her act as her Pink Hollywood Gay or something.

That’s the double gay dream: Being friends with Kathy Griffin and being mentioned in her act. I was a huge fan before we became friends, so to have a story mentioned in her act was very surreal.

Do you have any juicy celebrity stories? Not in this show, but I do. I am not as willing as Kathy is to “go there.” Most Hollywood types are so difficult to deal with anyway, that once you do something publicly, it’s even worse. I see how tough it can be for her. It’s isolated her. There’s groups of people that shy away from her. I think they laugh at her in the privacy of their homes, but if she walks into a party, they all avoid her like the plague. That’s a very lonely kind of fame.

I tell stories in my show and I don’t say it and people don’t know that I’m talking about a very famous person. I could cash in and make this more exciting, but I choose not to.

What can people expect from your show? It’s a comedic, self-effacing journey through story and song about my life and experiences as a compulsive overeater. It goes into my food addiction and how that is a manifestation of my experiences as a child, as well as an adult. My experiences in show business, my experiences as a gay man, all sorts of things. The show is Ryan O’Connor Eats His Feelings, but it could just as easily be Joe Schmo Eats His Feelings or Tiger Woods Fucks His Feelings.

You don’t have to be gay to enjoy it then. My show’s definitely not a gay show. It’s a gay story so gay people relate to it immediately.

Are you empowered by the self-effacing part of it, beating others to the punch? That’s absolutely what it is. The whole show is what I learned as a 10-year-old fat kid. My mom always told me if I made the joke first, they can’t make it. That was my survival tool as a fat boy and a gay boy. That’s how you get through it.

This article appeared in the National Pride edition in the Dallas Voice print edition June 18, 2010.

—  Dallasvoice

California commission fines Mormon church $5K for failing to report Prop 8 contributions

Fred Karger
Fred Karger

The California Fair Political Practices Commission has ordered the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to pay a $5,538 fine after the church failed to properly report its contributions — about $37,000 — to the 2008 campaign to pass Proposition 8, the ballot initiative that successfully amended the state’s Constitution to ban same-sex marriage.

The vote happened in November 2008, about five months after the California State Supreme Court ruled that a ban on gay marriage violated the California Constitution.

The fine came in response to a complaint filed by Fred Karger, a California gay man who fought against Prop 8 and who earlier this year launched his own campaign for president.

According to the Los Angeles Times, a statement on the website on the Salt Lake City-based church’s website said it “unintentionally failed to file daily reports detailing approximately $37,000 in non-monetary contributions. The amount of contributions not reported represented the cost of staff time spent by church employees on activities to help the Yes on 8 committee during the final two weeks of the election.”

CBS News reports: “While the Fair Political Practices Commission could have assessed a $5,000 fine for each violation, it reportedly opted for a streamlined process that resulted in a deal with the church for the $5,539 fine.”

—  admin

Gays need to stop stuffin' it down Utah senator's throat

Utah state Sen. Chris Buttars said: “I don’t mind gays. I just don’t want ’em stuffin’ it down my throat all the time, and certainly in my kid’s face.”

The Utah Republican has been a staunch opponent of LGBT rights — until now. He authored the state’s anti-marriage law. But certainly he wouldn’t go against the wishes of the Mormon church.

Because the Mormon church has now supported protection for gays and lesbians in housing and employment in Salt Lake City, the senator might support those rights statewide. He may even sponsor the bill.

— David Taffet

—  Dallasvoice