Gay film director James Ivory at SMU for screenings of his works this week

James Ivory

UPDATE/CLARIFICATION: Ivory will not be in attendance for the Q&A sessions tonight and tomorrow. Those will be hosted by Sean Griffin. Ivory will be doing his master class today. I regret the error.

James Ivory, who with his collaborator and partner Ismail Merchant made some of the best period dramas of the last 30 years, is coming to Dallas for a series organized by the SMU Division of Cinema-Television’s gay chair, Sean Griffin.

Ivory’s best-known films as a director, which netted him three Oscar nominations, include A Room with a View, Howards End and The Remains of the Day, but his output also includes the gay coming-of-age romance Maurice, Mr. and Mrs. Bridge and his last film with Merchant (who died in 2005), The White Countess.

Ivory, who despite his European/colonial sensibilities is American, will participate in a series of master classes and presentations of three films (followed by Q&As) on consecutive days this week: Heat and Dust on Dec. 2 at 7:30 p.m.; Surviving Picasso on Dec. 3 at 6:30 p.m.; and The Remains of the Day on Dec. 4 at 3 p.m. (two Merchant-directed films will also be screened). All showings take place inside the Horchow Auditorium at the Dallas Museum of Art. For tickets, go here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Applause • Rainbow connection

Jose Reyes, chair of the DSO’s gala,makes a musical outreach to the gay community

Jose Reyes
As chair of the DSO’s gala after party, Jose Reyes sees this as the perfect opportunity to reach out to the gay community.

When the Dallas Symphony Orchestra people began planning their season kickoff gala and after-party, longtime volunteer Jose Reyes had an a-ha moment: An ultra-lush soiree of society’s finest that wasn’t being pushed to the LGBT community? It didn’t make sense.

When he chimed in that this should be a direction to consider, the DSO went him one better.

“They asked me if I wanted to chair the event,” Reyes says. “I said absolutely!”

This brought to light a bigger notion to Reyes prompting, him to root out the connection between Dallas’ premium philharmonic and the gay community. As a 20-year DSO supporter and a member of the gay community, the answer was really in front of him the whole time, and obvious to all Dallas gay … whether they realized it or not.

“The Easter concert at Lee Park targets us,” he says. “The DSO is keenly aware that the audience that day isn’t just Mr. and Mrs. Jones, it’s also Mr. and Mr. Jones and that is perfectly fine with them.”

The annual event is right there among gay events with the Pride Parade and the Halloween block party in terms of visibility. With that, Reyes witnesses the DSO’s support of the community upfront and now wants to turn that around. He knows there’s a strong connection that needs to be realized.

“It’s no secret the gay community is a huge supporter of the arts. We’re the tastemakers aren’t we?” he says. “That concert may be free to you and me, but it’s very expensive to put on so I feel it’s important we support them back.”

Reyes figures this gala will do just that, because gays love a good party. This year, they gala — a fundraiser for education and programs by the DSO — will be a huge, saucy affair (see sidebar).

“The gala concert with pianist Jeffrey Kahane and the after party experience is going to be fabulous and the only ticket in town. The Meyerson lobby will be completely transformed into a romantic 18th century European garden in the time of Beethoven.”

He thinks with a direct push to the community, it will respond. Sometimes all that’s needed, according to Reyes, is an invitation. He assures this is the one to get.

“The gays are gonna love it,” he assures. “And the DSO loves its gays.”

— Rich Lopez

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 27, 2010

—  Kevin Thomas