Best bets • 09.23.11

Saturday 09.24

Spend the weekend with Candis
We were excited to see trans actress Candis Cayne land the juicy role of Carmelita Rainer on Dirty, Sexy, Money and then sad to see it go after two seasons. Now we can see the actress/entertainer up close as she comes to Dallas. Cayne performs at Dish’s Drag Brunch on Sunday, but first she headlines the Rose Room.

DEETS: The Rose Room (inside S4), 3911 Cedar Springs Road. 11 p.m. Caven.com.

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Tuesday 09.27

‘Hair’ raising experience
How gay is the musical Hair? Find out at this special performance as the Lexus Broadway series presents GLBT Broadway in Hamon Hall. The pre-show event features Dallas Voice LifeStyle Editor Arnold Wayne Jones discussing issues of gender identity and sexuality within the counterculture musical.

DEETS: Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. 7 p.m.  $30–$150. ATTPAC.org.

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Friday 09.30

Pride is hilarious
As Tarrant County Pride gets underway, Open Door Productions takes part with comedian Suzanne Westenhoefer. Her Semi-Sweet show will be the comic highlight of Pride in Cowtown

DEETS: Sheraton Hotel, 1701 Commerce St. 8 p.m. $25–$30. OpenDoorProductionsTX.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 23, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

A good head on his shoulders

For actor Matt DeAngelis, the flower power musical ‘Hair’ isn’t just a time capsule — it’s a reminder of the transformative effect of theater

ARNOLD WAYNE JONES | Life+Style Editor
jones@dallasvoice.com

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HAIR
Winspear Opera House,
2403 Flora St.
Sept.. 20–Oct. 2
ATTPAC.org

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Matt DeAngelis wasn’t even alive when the hippie Summer of Love took place, but for the last two years, he’s happily relived it eight times a week as one of the original cast members in the Tony Award-winning revival of Hair.

“I didn’t know a lot about the show before I was cast in it,” says the 28-year-old Boston native who now makes his home in New York. “I’m sort of a contemporary rock musical theater singer and always have been, so when I started doing Hair I said, ‘How did I miss this for this long?’ But my parents never listened to it — they didn’t listen to the Beatles either, so I missed that, too.”

DeAngelis and other members of the original cast bring the show to that reddest of reds when they open at the Winspear Opera House Tuesday as part of the Lexus Broadway Series. In fact, this company is coming directly from the New York production, where they spent the summer.

That means DeAngelis was in New York when same-sex marriage was legalized in the Empire State. To commemorate it, three gay couples wed on the stage of the St. James Theatre while the Hair company looked on.
“I was standing center stage for that,” DeAngelis boasts. “A doorman and usher at different theaters were one couple, an actor whom I didn’t know and a playwright were another couple, Terri White and her longtime girlfriend got married — Terri’s a legend in our industry. It was fantastic!”

Combining theater and activism seems like a perfect fit for a show like Hair.

“Gay rights are important to theater people, ya know? Gavin Creel, who was our original Claude [and who performed at last year’s Black Tie Dinner], inspired us to do a bunch of work with Broadway Impact. We did a big benefit in London, we marched on Washington for the marriage equality rally. We have such a special group of producers — they lost $150,000 to let us go to Washington. But it’s such a special cause for our company, because right is right. We’ve all taken the message of Hair and the idea of advocacy for what you believe in.”

Don’t expect to see similar commitment ceremonies on the stage of the Winspear, though.

“To me, marriage isn’t symbolic — it is real,” DeAngelis says. “I wish we could [perform a same-sex marriage] every night in every city. But that was really just a victory lap for us: It said in the biggest metropolis in the U.S., you can get married. If it wasn’t legal it wouldn’t have mattered.”

Hair is a slightly formless musical, set in 1967 (before the madness of 1968 — the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the escalation of the war in Vietnam) where free-love (including then-provocative issues of interracial dating and homosexuality), drug use and counterculture attitudes are vigorously embraced. Still, some of the controversy over it, especially its notorious nude scene, puzzles DeAngelis.

“I think it’s an incredibly powerful moment in the context of the show. We had one walkout where a woman grabbed her daughter and stormed out. People get all bent out of shape because we took our clothes off for 30 seconds, and it’s not even sexual. But we do far more offensive things in the show with our clothes on: humping, drug use, language. I sing a song called ‘Sodomy’ — though granted, people walk out during that too,” he laughs.

A show like this may be a good fit in gay-friendly NYC, but DeAngelis likes the idea of bringing the message to the people, and not just preaching to the choir.

“Not always playing to a liberal New York audience is sort of the point of the show for us,” he says. “It’s such a message show; taking it to the people is important. Just because you come see Hair doesn’t mean you need to leave as a flower child. We say what we have to say and confront people. If we change a few minds, that’s awesome, but what we really want to do is force people to think about it.That’s the art form. Theater is important — I couldn’t do it for a living if I didn’t believe that. It really has an impact on people, shining a light on the darkest of corners.”

And, like few other musicals, Hair certainly does let the sunshine in.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 16, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

‘Hair’ single tickets go on sale today

The Lexus Broadway Series at the Winspear kicks off its new season around Dallas Pride with the local premiere of the recent B’way revival of the sexually liberated hippie musical Hair, which on Broadway starred out actor Gavin Creel (who appeared last year at the Black Tie Dinner here). Individual tickets go on sale today at 10 a.m. Opening night is always fun, but I might suggestion getting seats for the second-week Tuesday performance. That’s the day the Series has selected as, for want of a better word, “gay night” at the Winspear, with s special pre-show talk and reception. I’ll tell you more about that later…

And just how gay is this 42 year old show? Pretty damn gay. In fact, last week after New York officially began permitting same-sex marriage, the stage of the Broadway production of Hair was host to three ceremonies. Don’t expect those on the floor of the Winspear, though….

—  Arnold Wayne Jones