World AIDS Day event planned in Plano

Roseann Rosetti opening a Quilt panel

In addition to co-sponsoring the World AIDS Day event at the new Main Street Garden in Dallas, C.U.R.E. will host a commemoration in Plano.

Billed as a ceremony of healing and hope, the Plano gathering will remember people lost to AIDS. Panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt will be on display. It takes place at Community Unitarian Universalist Church at 2875 East Parker Road. Plano-based Health Services of North Texas is also sponsoring.

“Our ceremony will include the dedication of new panels created by family and friends of a loved one lost to AIDS,” said C.U.R.E. co-founder Roseann Rosetti. “The new panels will be presented to The Names Project Foundation to be included as part of the nationally acclaimed AIDS Memorial Quilt.”

Anyone with a new panel to present may attend the ceremony.

“If you would like to present a panel in honor of someone you know and love, C.U.R.E. will be honored have you dedicate and present your panel at our World AIDS Day ceremony,” Rosetti said.

The panels will be sent to the Names Project’s home in Atlanta to be sewn into blocks for exhibit.

—  David Taffet

Pride party announced for Collin County

Morris Garcia and Tim Phillips announced this week that they will be sponsoring the inaugural Come As You Are Pride party this month. Garcia, who is on the board of the Collin County Gay & Lesbian Alliance, sent over the official flier for the event (below) which takes place June 25. Come As You Are will serve as a fundraiser for C.U.R.E. 2011 which will exhibit panels from the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt at the Dallas Convention Center this fall.




—  Rich Lopez

Local Briefs

DBA, others sponsor mayoral debate

Several organizations in North Texas are sponsoring a one-hour debate between Dallas mayoral runoff candidates David Kunkle and Mike Rawlings on Monday, June 6, at the Pavillion at the Belo Mansion, 2101 Ross Ave. in Dallas. The forum will be moderated by Shawn Williams, editor of Dallas South News.

The debate, which will begin promptly at noon, is free and open to the public. An optional $13 lunch buffet will be served beginning at 11:30 a.m.

The debate is sponsored by the Public Forum Committee of the Dallas Bar Association, the Dallas Asian American Bar Association, the Dallas Association of Young Lawyers, the Dallas Hispanic Bar Association, J.L. Turner Legal Association and the League of Women Voters of Dallas, the program is intended to educate the Dallas legal community and public of the backgrounds and philosophies of the candidates. The Dallas Bar Association is a non-partisan organization.

Those interested in attending are asked to RSVP to sevans@dallasbar.org so adequate seating is available.

C.U.R.E. begins fundraising for Quilt

On Sept. 30–Oct. 2, C.U.R.E. 2011 will bring panels from the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt to the Dallas Convention Center. This display will be the largest seen since the Quilt was exhibited on the National Mall in Washington DC. Dallas will be the venue for a national event focusing on educating our diverse populations about AIDS and how to prevent its spread.

To help fund the weekend, C.U.R.E. has started a fundraising campaign, asking people to donate just $2 and to ask friends and family to do the same. The link to make a donation through PayPal is CureNTx.org.

C.U.R.E was founded by Roseann Rossetti and Rosemary Odom. Tyler Sweatman is the event director for the Quilt display.

United Way disburses funds

United Way of Greater Dallas voted to disburse $25 million to 78 nonprofit organizations in the Dallas area. Because of new criteria that emphasized improving education, income or health, some new agencies received money and others lost their United Way funding.

Among the regular recipients are Resource Center Dallas, which will receive $383,409, and AIDS Arms, which will receive $772,548. Bryan’s House is one of the new agencies receiving United Way funding and they will get $315,106.

Donors who sign up to contribute through United Way can designate an agency, if that organization is among their approved agencies. •

—  John Wright

C.U.R.E. announces huge AIDS Quilt display for 2011

Display in Plano will be largest in more than a decade, with at least 500 panels included, organizers say

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer taffet@dallasvoice.com

TIME TO REMEMBER | Visitors walk through a display of panels from the NAMES Project Quilt exhibited Wednesday, Dec. 1, at the Interfaith Peace Chapel as part of a World AIDS Day event. Next September, C.U.R.E. will bring more than 500 Quilt panels to Plano for the largest display in a decade. (David Taffet/Dallas Voice)

PLANO — C.U.R.E. will bring at least 500 panels of the Names Project’s AIDS Memorial Quilt to the Dallas Convention Center next September for the largest display since the entire Quilt was shown on the Mall in Washington, D.C. in 1996, according to C.U.R.E. leaders.

The Plano-based group made the announcement at their World AIDS Day event at Event1013 in Plano, where they displayed 13 blocks of the Quilt. They placed other panels at several other corporate headquarters located in Plano.

C.U.R.E. President and founder Rosemarie Odom said that one of those companies, Pepsico, has signed to be the lead sponsor of the Quilt display next year.

She said they are tentatively set to display the panels in Exhibit Hall F of the Convention Center from Sept. 30 through Oct. 2.

Tyler Sweatman is the event director. He said that the dates were chosen to correspond with LifeWalk. He’s hoping Lone Star Ride, which will take place the weekend before the event, will also participate.

“We’d love LifeWalk to walk right through the Convention Center,” said Odom.

Sweatman said that they will be requesting specific panels and will be taking requests from the community. He said it would be easier to get more of the requested panels in September than around next year’s World AIDS Day.

Sweatman said he was living in San Francisco in 1987 when Cleve Jones started the project. He watched the sewing going on in a little shop on Castro Street to memorialize friends who had died of AIDS.

Sweatman said he is amazed at how much the Quilt grew in just a few years.

The Quilt now has 91,000 names representing 17.5 percent of those who have died of AIDS in the United States. The Quilt was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 and, at 1,293,300 square feet, is the largest piece of folk art ever produced. It weighs 54 tons.

Each panel is three feet by six feet, the size of a coffin. Eight panels are sewn together to form a block.  Several years ago, the Quilt moved from its original home in San Francisco to Atlanta. Sweatman said he expects the Quilt eventually to be housed in the Smithsonian.

The first day of the 2011 Quilt display is a Friday, and Sweatman said he hopes school groups from around North Texas as well as Oklahoma and Arkansas will come to see the display.

“Our goal is AIDS education,” he said.

To encourage the most people to see the Quilt, admission will be free. But staging the event will be costly. The group, which has non-profit status, is looking for additional sponsors and donations.

In addition to the cost of shipping the Quilt back and forth from Atlanta, there is the rental of the Convention Center, advertising, lighting and sound equipment.

During large displays, the names of persons who have died of AIDS are continuously read.

Volunteers are needed as Quilt monitors. Sweatman said he would especially like people who made any of the quilt panels or those who knew the people represented on the panels to talk about who they were.

Bono’s group ONE will coordinate volunteers. Sweatman said details are being worked out and will have more information about that and about volunteer opportunities soon.

Odom was excited about the opportunity to present such a large piece of the Quilt in Dallas. She became emotional standing in front of one of the 13 blocks hanging in Plano on World AIDS Day and warned about what an emotional experience the large display in September would be.

“I don’t want anyone to walk away from one of our events feeling good,” she said.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 3, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Panels from AIDS quilt on display in Plano

Lavonne Barrows points to a quilt panel she made in 2004

Panels from the Names Project’s AIDS Memorial Quilt will hang at Event1013 in Plano through Wednesday, Dec. 1, World AIDS Day.

Among the 13 panels are those from AIDS Services of Dallas and the Round-Up Saloon.

Lavonne Barrows is a quilt monitor. Her son has been HIV-positive for 20 years. Along with C.U.R.E. President Rosemary Odom, she made several of the panels hanging in Plano. The panels she made honor children from the Bless Gerard’s Children’s Home in Mandeni kwaZulu/Natal, South Africa. The panels were sewn in 2004 and presented to the Names Project on World AIDS Day that year.

Odom explained that they had gotten permission to honor the orphanage’s children who died of AIDS. About a year later, the couple who ran the home was ambushed and murdered.

The display is presented by Community Unity Respect Education, or C.U.R.E., a Plano-based group that educates about AIDS through displays of the Quilt.

Event1013, 1013 E. 15th St., Plano. Nov. 29-30 until 4:30 p.m. Dec. 1 from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. followed by a reception from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free parking is available in a lot across the street that is accessible from 14th Street.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

Round-Up

Two panels for original Round-Up Saloon owner, Tom Davis

Alan Ross used to stage the parade almost singlehandedly. Now the parade is named for him.

David Barton opened Hunky’s with his brother Rick.

ASD

Three panels remember residents of AIDS Services Dallas. The panels only list them by first name.

Band

Oak Lawn Band

OLBA

Oak Lawn Bowling Association. Every group in the LGBT community lost friends.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

chorale

This Turtle Creek Chorale panel (lower left) was one of the earliest panels in the Quilt, made in 1987. It remembered the 12 members of the Chorale who had died of AIDS. Within a few years, the Chorale was remembering more than 100 members who had died.

Each year at their Christmas performances, they place one poinsettia on stage for each member they have lost to AIDS.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

NelsonTebedo

Bill Nelson and Terry Tebedo founded Crossroads Market. When they saw some of their customers were suddenly in need, they put up a shelf in the back of the store with a sign that read, “Leave a can, take a can.” That was the beginning of the AIDS Food Pantry.
Bill was the first openly gay person to run for Dallas city council. The campaign ran out of Crossroads Market. If you saw “Milk,” you understand the campaign playbook down to details like going to the bathhouses to find people to drive to the polls on Election Day. Bill and Terry were founders of DGLA and the Resource Center. In 1983, Bill was the first host of “Lambda Weekly” on KNON.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

Jon Benov

Jon Benov was my first partner.

He is remembered on a panel made by his bowling league in Atlanta.

Jon died 20 years ago next month in January, 1990.

—  David Taffet

A Dallas panel from the Quilt on World AIDS Day

Quilt Panel

Duane Puryear made a panel for himself, which hung at the Resource Center for a couple of years. He took this panel to Washington for the first quilt display on the Mall.

On the way home from Washington, he left it in the overhead bin and it was never seen again.

However, there were a number of pictures of the panel. After he died, his mom recreated the original panel from pictures.

The panel displayed in the quilt is the recreation his mom made. The new panel hung at the Resource Center until it was inducted into the quilt in a ceremony at Fair Park.

Because of its powerful, yet simple message, this remains the most requested panel in the quilt.

Also in this block are other Dallas panels.

Don Weiner was president of Congregation Beth El Binah. He applied for the group to become a member of the Union for Reform Judaism but died before the predominantly gay and lesbian synagogue was accepted into the mainstream movement in 1993. The half star was the synagogue’s logo at the time.

The AIDS Mastery Workshop was a group that met at the Resource Center and helped people deal with their diagnosis at a time when there were no drugs to treat HIV.

—  David Taffet