Crime watch leader: ‘We have to learn to STOP leaving stuff in our vehicles’

The Dallas Morning News reports today that overall reported crime was down 11 percent in 2012 citywide, despite a slight increase in violent offenses. We’ll have a detailed look at 2012 crime stats for the Oak Lawn gayborhood in this Friday’s print edition. But for now we thought we’d share these maps sent over by Nancy Weinberger, leader of the Oak Lawn crime watch group. The maps show where crimes occurred in the area for December. Note that the crime watch group’s jurisdiction is split into two DPD divisions by Oak Lawn Avenue. The first map shows the portion that’s in the Northwest Division, while the second shows the portion that’s in the Central Division. As you can see BMVs (burglaries of motor vehicles) were by far the most common offense in December, numbering 38. As Weinberger said in her email to the group’s members, “We have to learn to STOP leaving stuff in our vehicles.” Check out the maps below.

—  John Wright

MAPS: Crime in the gayborhood

Oak Lawn volunteer crime watch leader Nancy Weinberger sent out the maps above and below (click to enlarge) on Thursday showing where major crimes occurred in her jurisdiction in August. Note that the area is divided between DPD’s Northwest and Central divisions, thereby necessitating two separate maps. Weinberger’s Oak Lawn Apartment Managers and Stakeholders Crime Watch group next meets at noon on Wednesday, Sept. 19 at the Oak Lawn Library. If you find these maps troubling, perhaps you should show up.

—  John Wright

MAP: Crime in Oak Lawn

 

Oak Lawn crime watch leader Nancy Weinberger sent out the above map Monday showing where offenses occurred in Oak Lawn during the month of July. The Oak Lawn Apartment Managers and Stakeholders Crime Watch Group holds its monthly meeting at noon Wednesday, Aug. 15 at the Oak Lawn Library Branch.

—  John Wright

Where crimes happened in Oak Lawn in January

Nancy Weinberger, leader of the Oak Lawn Stakeholders crime watch group, sent out these handy-dandy maps today (click to enlarge) showing where offenses took place in January 2012. Weinberger said Chief Malik Aziz, who’s over DPD’s Northwest Division, will be the crime watch group’s featured speaker during its regular meeting next week, at noon Wednesday at the Oak Lawn Library Branch.

—  John Wright

POLICE BLOTTER: Aggravated robbery reported on Gilbert Avenue in Oak Lawn

Oak Lawn crime watch leader Nancy Weinberger reports in an email:

Last night (Jan. 29) a little after 9 p.m. in the 4500 block of Gilbert there was a robbery/assault. The victims were unloading their car after coming home from dinner. They were assaulted and robbed at gunpoint by two young blacks … one male, one female, skinny and probably 18-20 years old. The suspects were walking but there was another person (also black) waiting for them in a car nearby and they escaped. It was an early 2000s, dark-colored Crown Victoria or Grand Marquis. The female had long, braided, ponytail hair. The victim suspects they were on drugs. The police tried to locate them using the Find my Phone app on the stolen phone but they got away.

This is information I was provided by one of the victims via email. The police report number I was given is 24512-Z.

As of Monday afternoon the report had not been posted on DPD’s website, and a department spokesperson couldn’t immediately be reached. Stay tuned to Instant Tea for updates.

UPDATE: Sr. Cpl. Kevin Janse, a spokesman for DPD, said police have no suspects and have made no arrests.

—  John Wright

Bashing gays with baseball bats has become an American pastime, especially in Oak Lawn

S1N1_NotreDame_1803_1Online
“What’s the easiest way to turn a fruit into a vegetable?” this cartoon in Notre Dame’s student newspaper asked. Answer: “A baseball bat.” The newspaper later apologized.

We’ll have more on that anti-gay hate crime in Oak Lawn over the weekend in Friday’s Voice, but for now I wanted to share a note I received from William Waybourn, who was a pioneering gay-rights activist in Dallas and now lives in the Washington, D.C. area. Waybourn, who helped start Crossroads Market and served as president of the Dallas Gay Alliance, went on to found the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund and lead the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. He now lives on the side of a mountain about an hour west of D.C. and, coincidentally, a mile or so from my parents. Anyhow, Waybourn recalls that this isn’t the first time gay men have been attacked in the Cedar Springs area with baseball bats. Here’s his note:

I don’t recall the exact details, but bashing gays with baseball bats around Cedar Springs and Throckmorton is not new. Nor has there ever been much interested in classifying these crimes as hate crimes.

The first incident I recall was an AIDS educator who got bashed in the parking lot behind (then) Crossroads Market and the food pantry. His assailants were never caught and as far as I recall, the crime was never solved. The kid didn’t die as a direct result of the attack, but he never recovered physically (or mentally). Unknown to anyone at the time, he had AIDS and the bashing complicated his physical health to a great extent. His official cause of death was AIDS. Had he been in the military and wounded, his subsequent “unrelated” death would have qualified him for a hero’s burial, as they are adding names of individuals wounded in the Vietnam War who died later from pneumonia, et al.

It seems that Dallas has a high number of baseball bat cases. Maybe they should quit giving them away at Rangers’ bat nights.

Waybourn isn’t alone in his recollections about baseball bats and gay-bashings in Dallas. Nancy Weinberger, a longtime local crime watch leader, sent out a note last night about this weekend’s incident.

“This is not the first time I have heard of baseball bats being thrown around in Oak Lawn,” Weinberger said in the message to Oak Lawn crime watch members.

The apparent prevalence of baseball bats being used in violent acts against gays may have prompted the student newspaper at Notre Dame University to run a cartoon in January making light of the phenomenon.

The newspaper later apologized for the cartoon, which is shown above.

—  John Wright