Trevor Project calls for moment of silence for suicide victims at 7 p.m. Dallas time today

We aren’t aware of any specific events planned for Dallas in response to the suicides of six teens in the U.S. who were gay or perceived as gay in September, but it looks like a National Safe Schools Day of Action will take place next Tuesday, Oct. 5. Also, there will be a Stand Up to Youth Suicide Rally and March in San Francisco on Friday, Oct. 8, and rallies are reportedly being planned next weekend through the “It Gets Better” project, in advance of National Coming Out Day on Oct. 11. Does anyone know of anything that’s planned for Dallas? As we reported earlier, many plan to gather around Big Tex at the State Fair at noon Saturday, Oct. 9 during the unofficial Gay Day, so perhaps this would be a good time to do it. Just a thought.

Anyhow, The Trevor Project is calling for a moment of silence and reflection at 7 tonight Dallas time in remembrance of the victims. Here’s the full press release:

The Trevor Project Asks All Americans for a Moment of Silence at 8pm ET, 5pm PT Tonight

(West Hollywood, CA, October 1, 2010) – Statement from Charles Robbins, Executive Director of The Trevor Project:

Late last night, The Trevor Project learned of yet another young LGBTQ person who died by suicide. Raymond Chase was a sophomore at Johnson and Wales University in Rhode Island when he took his own life on Wednesday. Words do not adequately describe the tragic loss felt across the country for the five promising young individuals who were so isolated and felt so alone and cut off from their peers and society that suicide became an option.

We encourage all people who feel connected to these tragic events, whether friends, family, peers, community members, and sympathetic human beings to pause today at 8:00 PM Eastern, 5:00 PM Pacific for a moment of silence and reflection in remembrance of Raymond Chase, Tyler Clementi, Seth Walsh, Asher Brown and Billy Lucas. Events are being planned across the country in the coming weeks to mourn the loss of these young people, and to take action to stop bullying crimes that lead to suicide, and a website http://makeitbetterproject.com/.

To help stop the cycle that leads young lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning people to feel they are alone, connect them to The Trevor Project. There is a place that’s free of bullying and judgment online, where young LGBTQ people, their friends and allies ages 13-24 can connect safely and be themselves. More than 13,000 young people already belong to TrevorSpace.org, and more youth join every day. If you or someone you care about shows warning signs for suicide, please do not hesitate to call The Trevor Lifeline at: 866-4-U-TREVOR (866-488-7386). The call is free and confidential.

We mourn the loss of these 5 young people, and today we will stand in silent solidarity for an end to the unnecessary loss of young lives.

—  John Wright

Thankfully someone took it upon themselves to declare Gay Day at the State Fair — Oct. 9

Big Tex loves his gays.

Last year, people were asking us about gay day at the State Fair, but we were as much in the dark. When Big Tex started rolling around this year, we were bracing ourselves for the inquiries. And then Facebook saved the day — or rather, Mike Weaver did.

Weaver, who hails from Watauga, started the Gay Day at the State Fair Facebook event to begin getting a consensus on when it should be. Of course, one date wasn’t going to make everyone happy, but he made the final decision to say that Saturday, Oct. 9 is the day. I say it’s not such a bad day to pick. It doesn’t compete with LifeWalk on Sunday and is two days shy of National Coming Out Day on Monday. He proposes that LGBT peeps wear colors of the rainbow and meet at noon at Big Tex.

Although he didn’t make it out last year, Weaver wanted to be part of the community coming together. “We can show people who are GLBT that it is OK to step out of the box and be with your fellow GLBTs and supporters. Maybe this could be a day for people who stay in because there scared to get them to come have fun.”

I’m there. That is if I can break away from the just close-enough Belgian waffle stand.

—  Rich Lopez

Patti hits the red carpet

This year’s Fruit Bowl host offers some advice on being glam and sporty

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

Patti Le Plae Safe
STRIKE HER UP | Patti Le Plae Safe knows how to vamp it up — even for a bowling tourney.

RED CARPET FRUIT BOWL
USA Bowl, 10920 Composite Drive. Aug. 15 at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. $30 individual, $100 team.
HRC.org/FruitBowl

Unless you’re George Clooney or even Pamela Anderson, the red carpet treatment doesn’t come everyday. Film openings, swanky parties and awards shows up the ante by giving guests a fancy entrance, so why not a bowling tournament, too? This year, the annual Human Rights Campaign’s National Coming Out Day Projects adds a little scarlet glamour to Fruit Bowl. And host Patti Le Plae Safe has some advice on what to wear for those flashing cameras.

“This is all about the paparazzi,” Plae Safe says. “People will be taking pictures and asking for autographs. Since it is the red carpet, people should have on their finest bowling attire.”

She figures all the big designers will be making an appearance on Fruit Bowl players: Prada, Ralph Lauren and Gucci — if they actually designed bowling wear. Shoes are both an accessory and equipment, so the trick is making high fashion also utilitarian. Plae Safe will play it safe, but she’ll nix her usual glam heels for a regular pair of sporty flats.

“I’m gonna have to wear bowling shoes,” she says. “I don’t wanna fall! The rest of me though is going to be all red carpet.”
Despite the encouraged attire, she wants people to come out for some lane action and support the HRC. She was on board with this event since last year, which turned out to be fortuitous for both parties.

“I have a strong connection to the event and to HRC,” he says. “Plus, I’m on a bowling team and people know me, so I think it really was a perfect fit this year.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 13, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas