Start the week off with ‘A Night of Stories’ by Nouveau 47

January looks like The Most wonderful time of the year

Storytelling strikes a new kind of nerve thanks to Nouveau 47′s Theatre Apprēsh. As people make their resolutions for the 2011, Nouveau 47 brings together individuals who reveal the promises they made to themselves for this new year. Tonight’s theme is The Most: Epic Resolution. Perfect timing since most of us are probably losing interest in our own already. This is “part of Nouveau 47’s newest ongoing project: THE MOST: A NIGHT OF STORIES — an opportunity for writers, performers, non-performers, professionals, aspiring writers, non-aspiring writers, and people from the community to share their unique story in front of the DFW community.”

And if you got you’re own story to tell, stick around for the reception after and sign up for the next event. We know you got stories to tell.

DEETS: The Magnolia Lounge, 1121 First Ave. (in Fair Park). 7:30 p.m. $5. BYOB. Facebook.com/Nouveau47

—  Rich Lopez

WATCH LIVE: House takes up DADT repeal

While we were over at Texas Land & Cattle for Meatfest, our office building’s annual holiday brunch, the U.S. House had the nerve to begin consideration of the standalone measure to repeal “don’t ask don’t tell.” We managed to scarf down our food and grab a fudge brownie to go, and it looks like the House is now voting on the rule for debate of the measure. This is not the actual vote on the bill, which will come later. Debate on the bill will continue after this vote. Watch live on the CSPAN website, and stay tuned for updates. Time to go reheat that brownie.

UPDATE: The House has voted to approve the rule for debate, 232-180. It is a closed rule, meaning no amendments will be allowed.

—  John Wright

First Baptist Dallas launches ‘Grinch Alert’

Pastor Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Church of Dallas

You all remember Pastor Robert Jeffress over at First Baptist Church in Dallas, right? He’s the one who riled up the LGBT community a couple of years ago with his “Gay is Not OK” sermon.

Well, now Pastor Jeffress is at it again. He and his church have created a new website, GrinchAlert.com, to warn us all about those horrible business people who have the nerve to say something like “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas,” or who, even worse, don’t recognize the Christian holiday at all.

So if someone or some business pisses you off while you are out commercializing Christmas this year, you can go to this website and post a comment designating them as “naughty.” And if they spell out “Jesus is the Reason for the Season” on their chain link fence using colored plastic cups and Christmas lights, you can go to the site and reward them with a “nice” post.

Jeffress told Dallas Morning News: “Too many businesses have bowed down to political correctness. I thought this would be a fun way to call out businesses that are refusing to celebrate Christmas.”

He also told the Morning News that First Baptist isn’t creating any standards on what determines “naughty” or “nice,” and that the church won’t be monitoring the site to protect businesses owned by non-Christians. I wonder if that means if I go to the site and add a post declaring Pastor Jeffress and his church are “naughty” because he is a completely hateful, bigoted jackass, that they will leave it up there? Or would they remove it and add me to the “naughty” list instead?

It’s tempting, but I will refrain. Instead, I will just offer this reminder to Pastor Jeffress and others like him: In the New Testament, in one of the Gospels, there is a story about how the Pharisees tried to trick Jesus into saying something that would get him in trouble, so they asked him, “What is the most important commandment?” (The trick, of course, is that no one commandment should be considered more important than any other.)

Jesus replied, “Love your neighbor as yourself, and love God above all else. Do that, and you will be following all the commandments.”

So here’s my message to Pastor Jeffress: Jesus said love your neighbor as yourself, and guess what — not all your neighbors are Christians. Don’t you think is is a little less than loving to expect them to kowtow to your religious beliefs by saying Merry Christmas, and by chiding them on your ridiculous website because they prefer to say “Happy Holidays” instead?

—  admin