Opaque shows if love truly is blind

If a glass of wine falls over in the dark, does it leave a stain? It’s an existential question only the laundry knows the answer to for sure — and we suspect they get a lot of practice after a night at Opaque, a dining-in-the-dark culinary experience having its first go-round in North Texas.

The concept seems like the antithesis of the classic foodie meal: Where’s the opportunity to savor the presentation, to drink in with the eyes as much as the palate? And how romantic is it to sit across from your sweetheart making goo-goo eyes and suggestive leers when the chocolate comes if he can’t even see you do it?

Still, there’s legitimate intrigue and curiosity attendant to this concept, which has made inroads into culinary culture for a few years now, with defenders saying the loss of sight actually stimulates the other senses.

You can sample the experience Friday through Monday, with seatings every half-hour each of the four nights. It could take the term “blind date” in an entirely new direction.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Aloft Hotel, 1033 Young St. Feb. 11–14. Seatings starting at 5:30 p.m. $99 per person (tax, tip and drinks extra). DarkDining.com

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Feb. 11, 2011.

—  John Wright

Out lesbian abruptly removed from dean position at Texas A&M University-Commerce

Christine Evans

An open lesbian has been unexpectedly removed from her position as dean of the College of Arts & Sciences at Texas A&M University-Commerce, and the student newspaper reports that “questions have been raised” about whether sexual orientation was a factor.

Christine Evans was removed as dean and given a position as a professor in the agriculture department. Evans told The East Texan that her sexual orientation “probably” wasn’t the reason for her removal as dean. But she adds that even if it was, she would have no recourse. Neither the university policy, nor state or federal law, includes employment protections for gays and lesbians.

“I am openly lesbian, and have made no attempt to either trumpet or hide that orientation,” Evans said. “I’m quite certain that most people on campus and in Commerce who have interacted with me to any extent are aware of that. I can also add that I have had no direct experience of mistreatment or different treatment related to the issue. …

“My personal opinion is that my sexual orientation was probably not the reason for my dismissal,” she said. “Further, although it hasn’t been shared with me, I would be very disappointed if I were to learn that my career status had been so abruptly altered by something so insubstantial.”

The provost of the university, Larry Lemanski, says Evans’ removal was a “personnel matter” and that he wanted to move the college “in a new direction.”

While Evans isn’t publicly claiming anti-gay discrimination, she did take an apparent swipe at the administration.

“It will be refreshing to have a supervisor I respect and colleagues I can trust,” she said.

—  John Wright