Ex-TCU linebacker Vincent Pryor came out as gay to teammates before setting sack record in 1994

Seventeen years after setting a school sack record during a landmark victory over Texas Tech, ex-TCU linebacker Vincent Pryor has revealed that he came out as gay to his teammates before the game:

“I knew that at the end of this game I was going to be free. I can be who I am. I am a gay athlete who just so happens to play football. I had no regrets. Everyone knows I’m gay. … I was just at peace with myself.”

“He was a beast” on the field, said Marcus Allen, Pryor’s teammate and the team’s middle linebacker. “I do believe that once he came out of the closet, he did feel relieved. You did notice something different about him. He was always happy, he felt good about himself, he felt like didn’t have anything to hide.”

Pryor’s 4 ½ sacks still stand in the TCU record book (he shares it with David Spradlin from 1987) as do his 34 sack yards. But that’s not why Pryor’s story is worth telling. Rather, it’s his journey of acceptance as an openly gay man and athlete in our most macho sport.

Pryor now lives in Chicago with his partner, whom he met at TCU but didn’t start dating until four years after they graduated. Read the full story from Jim Buzinski at OutSports here. And watch Pryor’s video for the “It Gets Better” project below.

—  Rich Lopez

Annise Parker has high approval rating despite bad economy and not being a media whore

David Taffet will have a full interview with Houston Mayor Annise Parker — who was in Dallas on Sunday for Pride — in this coming Friday’s Dallas Voice.

But for now, we point you to this story from KHOU Channel 11 about a recent poll showing that a solid majority of Houstonians approve of Parker’s job performance thus far.

Parker became the first openly gay person elected mayor of a major U.S. city last year.

In the poll conducted by Rice University, 14 percent rated Parker’s job performance excellent, 42 percent rated it good, 27 percent rated it fair, and only 6 percent rated it poor, with the remainder (11 percent) undecided.

The story notes that Parker’s approval rating is slightly lower than former Mayor Bill White’s was at the same point in his tenure. But it suggests that this is due to the bad economy and the fact that Parker doesn’t seek out media attention.

“What was interesting was how many people couldn’t rate her,” said professor Bob Stein, 11 News’ political analyst. “But in fairness, this is not the kind of mayor that looks for the press coverage and publicity that Mayor (Bill) White did.”

Parker tells KHOU that while she has no regrets about the job, the most difficult thing thus far has been visiting a fallen Houston police officer’s family in the hospital.

Again, for a full interview with Parker, see Friday’s Voice.

—  John Wright