The Nooner: Oprah, Minnesota governor’s race, H&M, Clover coffee, Cedar Hill slaying

Welcome to the inaugural edition of Instant Tea’s new midday news briefing, The Nooner™. Here goes nothing:

• Oprah denies she’s a lesbian in interview with Barbara Walters to air Thursday. (Video clip above.)

• Anti-gay, Target-backed Republican Tom Emmer concedes Minnesota governor’s race. Does this mean it’s OK to shop there again?

• Clover coffee arrives at Starbucks on Knox Street.

• H&M to open pop-up store at NorthPark today?

• Arrest of partner in Cedar Hill teacher’s murder a relief for family.

—  John Wright

Watch: Oprah Gets Emotional Over Relationship with Gayle — ‘I Am Not a Lesbian’

Oprah

Barbara Walters offers up a preview of her upcoming interview with Oprah Winfrey, in which she discusses her relationship with Gayle King, whom she calls "the mother I never had." Adding, "She is the sister everybody would want."

The HuffPost reports:

Oprah, who told herself she wouldn't let Walters make her cry, said that the reason those words brought her to tears is that she's never said them to Gayle herself.

"It's making me cry because I'm thinking about how much I probably have never told her that," she said.

Oprah also addressed the persistent rumors that she and Gayle are lesbians.

"I'm not a lesbian. I'm not even kind of a lesbian," she said. "And the reason why it irritates me is because it means that somebody must think I'm lying. That's number one. Number two: why would you want to hide it? That is not the way I run my life."

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP



To follow news on Oprah, check out our HUB. And "LIKE" it to follow updates on Facebook.


Towleroad News #gay

—  admin

Pastor James David Manning Doesn’t Need ‘Evidence’ To Know Oprah Is a Big Lez

Pastor James David Manning, the crackpot head preacher at ATLAH World Missionary Church in Harlem, has realized the power of web video. He's attacked President Obama (some sort of CIA conspiracy theory). He's explained why the Bible entitles him to call people faggots. And now he's out to prove Oprah is a lesbian — not by any actual evidence, mind you, but by gut feelings.

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Queerty

—  admin

Turning Oprah + Gayle’s Yosemite Park Camping Trip Into a Lesbian Scandal

How does the celebrity news machine turn a 2-second soundbite into a full-blown news story? Watch as E! reveals the secret sauce.

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Queerty

—  admin

Ricky and Portia Do Oprah

PORTIA DE ROSSI RICKY MARTIN X390Oprah kicks off November sweeps on Monday with Portia de Rossi, followed by Ricky Martin on Tuesday.  
Advocate.com: Daily News

—  admin

Oprah takes a sad look back in AIDS in America circa 1987

crossposted on Holy Bullies and Headless Monsters

I generally don't make this kind of warning but feel that I should in this case. What this clip shows will get you angry and will probably make you cry. But it needs to be shown what it was like when AIDS first came on the scene – the ignorance, the fear, the surreal hatred must be shown, remembered, and especially told to those who were too young to remember.

Oprah Winfrey took a look back at one of her 1987 shows. This particular one showed a community (Willamson, West Virginia) at odds with a young gay man with AIDS, Mike Sisco. The fears and hatred exploded when Sisco visited the local swimming pool and residents freaked out thinking that he had contaminated it. This is just a small clip of the show:

Pam’s House Blend – Front Page

—  admin

GLBT History Month’s 1st icon is gay ex-Marine from Texas who lost leg in Iraq war

For the fifth consecutive year, the Equality Forum presents GLBT icons for each day of October, to mark GLBT History Month. And this year’s first icon is Texas’ own Eric Alva of San Antonio, who was the first casualty of the Iraq war. Alva, a Marine staff sergeant, lost his leg when he stepped on a land mine three hours into the ground invasion in 2003. But it wasn’t until after Alva returned home — and had been visited by President George W. Bush in the hospital and appeared on “Oprah” — that he came out as gay and become a spokesman for the repeal of “don’t ask don’t tell.” From our story on Alva in April 2007:

He says it wasn’t until one night last fall that it came to him. He had always wanted to help people, but wasn’t sure how.

“I would always talk about it, but it was more words just coming out of my mouth because I never did anything about it,” he says.

After Alva’s partner, whom he met after returning from Iraq, pleaded with him to do something before his notoriety wore off, Alva decided to e-mail HRC.

“I said, ‘I don’t know how I may help you, but the story is I am a gay Marine,’” Alva recalls.

A few days later, HRC returned his call. Then, after U.S. Rep. Marty Meehan, D-Mass., announced plans to reintroduce the Military Readiness Enhancement Act, which would repeal “Don’t ask, don’t tell,” they called again.

“They called and said, “‘Eric, we need you now,’” Alva says. “I knew that what I was about to do was a huge sacrifice on my part. But I needed to tell people that this is the way the country should be.”

Of course, more than three years later, “don’t ask don’t tell” remains in place. So perhaps it’s fitting that Alva is the first icon of this year’s GLBT History Month. We haven’t heard much from him lately, but according to the Equality Federation, he’s working on his master’s degree in social work.

—  John Wright

A brand new Technicolor life

Country singer Chely Wright, announced this week as BTD’s 2010 Media Award winner, says coming out freed her

RELATED STORY: Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin named keynote speaker

Rich Lopez  |  Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

Chely Wright
Chely Wright

“Dallas has been a great market for me,” says Chely Wright.

Truer words might have never been spoken.

The country music star spoke highly of the city when referring to her past concerts here, but she’ll be heading to Dallas this year for a different reason — one that will reinforce her confidence in this city.

Officials with the Black Tie Dinner this week announced that Wright has been chosen to receive the 2010 Media Award during the annual fundraising gala set for Nov. 6.

They also announced that U.S. Rep. Tammy Baldwin, the openly lesbian Democrat from Wisconsin, will be the keynote speaker at the dinner.

When Wright came out of the closet in May with her biography, “Like Me,”  the media storm hit full force. She was touted as the first modern country singer to come out of thecloset, and her life story landed her on the cover of People magazine and Oprah.

As the recipient of the Black Tie Media Award, Wright sees it as a step in her reasoning to come out.

“This is noteworthy to be receiving this incredible honor,” she said. “I find it really interesting that this one thing I tried so hard to hide has really set me free. I’ve not only found this gay community but also activist, advocate and civil-minded communities. These are incredible people to be applauded.”

But not only was she setting herself free by coming out, Wright knew that since she was such a public figure, her coming out would facilitate dialogue and education.

Her announcement eclipsed her current album, “Lifted Off the Ground,” and even her career for the past 15 years. But she said she was prepared for that, because it was bigger than just a CD.

“The specific reason I did this in such a grand, comprehensive way was because I was aware this would be discussed,” she said. “As celebrities, we must be aware of our public capital in the community, and there had never been a commercial country artist who acknowledged being gay.

“That’s why I wrote a book, knowing that it was incumbent upon me to do so,” she said.

Along with all that attention came the backlash from both her audiences and the country music industry — no surprise considering it comprises a largely conservative demographic.

Wright said she knew there would be a negative reaction that could possibly put her into “Dixie Chicks vs. Texas” territory. But, she said, the good has outweighed the bad so far.

“I’m aware there are negative comments. No matter what you do, people will hate. On my social networks, we don’t leave them out unless they are overly caustic. We allow that dialogue to happen.

“But I think some of my fans never knew a gay person and thought they were all deviants,” she added. “They see this isn’t the case. Those people are the moveable middle.”

Wright mentions she even received support locally, saying KSCS on-air personality Chris Huff reached out to her after she came out.

To her, that was a step many people in the country music industry are either reluctant to take, or maybe do so quietly.

“Just judging from everything she said and her experiences and the emotions she fought, I think it was a really strong thing that she did,” Huff said. “I can’t imagine what she must’ve gone through the years leading up to that.”

Huff did what, according to Wright, not many have done in her industry. People have reached out to her, but only privately. She said public declarations of support by those in country music are hard to come by.

“Huff was one of the first to e-mail me after coming out.  The industry has a lot of really progressive people, but there are a lot of folks who just reach out privately. All of country music is not homophobic, but people don’t feel like that they can say ‘I’m behind you.’”

So instead, Wright is focusing on the positive support, which she has received from other LGBT celebrities, like Rosie O’Donnell and Lance Bass, and from the fans still coming to get her autograph. She’s even relishing the Prop 8 decision from her West Hollywood home.

But ultimately, she says, she feels simply free.

“Imagine a tiny secret being a big one and have it chasing you around, and you’re afraid. Then, it’s gone. It feels like I’ve retired an 80-hour-a-week job at a factory. There is so much emotional free space.

“I think my life felt like black and white before and now it’s in Technicolor.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 6, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Chely Wright watch: She announces first LGBT event appearance and is on Oprah today

Last night, it was announced that country music artist Chely Wright, who came out earlier this month, will make an appearance at the GLSEN Respect Awards in New York. This will be Wright’s first public event at an LGBT function. Her newest CD lists GLSEN in her liner notes, so clearly, she’s a supporter. The awards happen May 24 and will honor Cyndi Lauper, Pfizer, American Express, David Dechman and Michel Mercure, and Student Advocate of the Year Danielle Smith.

“I am thrilled to support such a wonderful organization,” Wright said in the press release. “I was immediately drawn to GLSEN because I want to do all that I can to help young people grow up free from fear and free to be themselves. GLSEN’s work to ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students are valued and respected in schools is a crucial part of building a better future.”

Seeing how many of us here won’t be making that event, you can also catch her today on Oprah. She talks about her coming out and regrets of pursuing her relationship with fellow country star, Brad Paisley. That’s gotta be a big ouch. I think it’s funny though, how Oprah’s site describes Wright’s bit this way.

Chely Wright rose to the top of the music charts. Now, she’s risking it all by telling the world she’s a lesbian.

—  Rich Lopez

Today's Oprah features the 'high school quarterback who became a lesbian'

Paul McKerrow is now Kimberly Reed.
Paul McKerrow is now Kimberly Reed.

If you’re heading home early due to the weather, catch today’s Oprah as she features this story.

Star quarterback, class president and an all-American guy. And then, Paul became Kimberly. Cameras follow her back to the football field to her high school reunion.

Although, am I wrong in feeling the title of the show (as in the headline here) reads a little off?

Oprah airs locally at 4 p.m. on Channel 8 and rebroadcasts at 8 p.m. on Channel 52.

—  Rich Lopez