Gay publishers ante up for World Series

Is it just us or does Giants closer Brian Wilson look like someone you’d run into at the Dallas Eagle?

Dallas Voice Publisher Robert Moore felt left out last week, after the publisher of New York City’s Gay City News refused to make a friendly, legal wager on the Rangers-Yankees series. I won’t repeat Robert’s exact comments here, but basically, the publishers of San Francisco’s Bay Area Reporter and The Philadelphia Gay News had bet on the National League Championship Series, and Robert badly wanted a piece of the action.

Well, good things come to those who wait, and thanks to the Rangers first-ever World Series berth, Moore is finally getting in. Moore and Bay Area Reporter Publisher Thomas E. Horn have agreed that the loser will contribute $1,000 to a charity in the winner’s city and appear in the opposing team’s gear in a photograph to be published in the winner’s newspaper.

And while these are some pretty high stakes already, we’d also like to see Moore don a leather-daddy beard a la Giants closer Brian Wilson should the Rangers lose.

—  John Wright

Kathleen Turner as Molly Ivins in Philly

Kathleen_Turner_highres

The current issue of Philadelphia Gay News has an interview with Kathleen Turner about her upcoming turn as Texas icon Molly Ivins in Philadelphia Theatre Company’s world premiere of “Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins.”

You can read the interview for yourself here.

In the interview, Turner talks about having known Ivins personally and says that she wanted to honor the fiery liberal columnist who died in 2007 of breast cancer. She says she met Ivins through her (Turner’s) work with People for the American Way, but that she got to know Ivins “because [former Texas Gov. Ann Richards used to live in my building. I would meet those ladies in the lobby and they would drag me up to their apartment and tell me stories.”

Well, I don’t know about you, but I can think of few things more entertaining than sitting around with Kathleen Turner and listening to Molly Ivins and Ann Richards tell stories!

Unfortunately, there are no plans at this time for Turner to perform the show here in Ivins’ home state. Maybe we can launch a letter-writing campaign and get her to come to Dallas or Fort Worth and do the show? What do you think?

—  admin

Pa. Senate committee to vote on marriage ban

This prick is from the same area of Pennsylvania as my parents.
This prick, Sen. John Eichelberger, represents the area of the state  where my dad was born and raised.

In my home state of Pennsylvania, a state Senate committee is expected to vote tomorrow on a proposed constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, according to a brief editorial in The Philadelphia Daily News. I’ve been uable to find any other coverage of tomorrow’s vote, including in the state’s largest LGBT publication, The Philadelphia Gay News. Similar proposals have been defeated twice before in Pennsylvania, in 2006 and 2008. This year the amendment reportedly was introduced by Republican Sen. John Eichelberger. Pennsylvania is one of 20 states that don’t have constitutional amendments banning same-sex marriage. But same-sex marriage is already prohibited by statute in the Keystone State. From the Daily News:

Uneeded [sic] reform

USUALLY, we’re delighted when state lawmakers talk about reforming the constitution. State government desperately needs to modernize, but tomorrow a Senate panel will consider taking a step backward. The Judiciary Committee is set to vote on Senate Bill 707, which would ban gay marriage in Pennsylvania.During these tough times, we can think of a few better uses of the Legislature’s time. How about a constitutional amendment to require lawmakers to pass a budget on time? Or to shrink the size and cost of the Legislature? How about updating the state’s antiquated tax code or campaign finance reform? All of these would be better than a constitutional amendment about gay marriage.

Gay marriage isn’t even legal in Pennsylvania. Nor are civil unions or any other kind acknowledgment of same-sex couples. There is no need for a constitutional amendment to ban something that isn’t happening anyway.

If supporters of traditional marriage are worried about the erosion of moral values, it would be more effective to ban divorce. Nearly 50 percent of marriages end in divorce.

We’re pretty sure gay people getting married isn’t the reason.

UPDATE: Write a note to the Pennsylvania Senate Judiciary Committee by going here.

—  John Wright