PHOTOS: Christian music duo (and partners) Jason & deMarco Saturday at MCC

I don’ t know how this show snuck in, but I found out about it late last week. Fortunately, one of our photographers got out to the show and snapped a few pics of the night.

The gay Christian pop duo Jason and deMarco came to Dallas for a benefit show Saturday at the Metropolitan Community Church in Carrollton. They headlined a night that also included Ray Norris, Buddy Shanahan and Kim Wisdom among others. The show was a fundraiser for AIDS Interfaith Network.

“Every dollar raised from the concert will go directly to help homeless clients with HIV/AIDS,” said Steven Pace, executive director of AIN. “We are so grateful to MCC-GD for their unwavering support.”

View more of Eric Scott Dickson’s photos from the event after the jump.

—  Rich Lopez

Uh Huh Her to stream tonight’s SXSW performance before stopping in Dallas

In this week’s issue, I spoke with Camila Grey about her band Uh Huh Her and how they have approached their second album. You might recognize them more as “that band Leisha Hailey is in.” The L Word star started out in music with another pop duo, The Murmurs.

UHH is doing the SXSW bit right now before heading up to town, and you can watch them live tonight via streaming web for a sneak preview of what their Monday show might be like. It’s just a 25 minute set so hopefully your buffering won’t act up. The band performs tonight at 10:30 p.m. for the Sessions at the Factory and the gig will be livestreamed here.

—  Rich Lopez

Lesbian pop duo Sugarbeach launches RightOutTV stream of LGBT musicians

Marlee Walchuk and Tully Callender of the music duo Sugarbeach are two women after my own heart. As out musicians, Walchuk said that as Sugarbeach was releasing their own videos, there were few sites to put them on save for getting swallowed up on YouTube. “There was nothing on the ‘net I found where people could see videos of queer artists,” Walchuk said. “Plus, I would mention queer artists I knew of, but no one heard of them. We saw a need and decided to fill it.”

And RightOutTV was born. The streaming video site features only videos from out LGBT musicians. The ladies worked on compiling artists and getting the basic site up for the last two months, and on Oct. 31 it went live. As far as Walchuk has found, theirs might be the only site providing the service. “It’s been a great process and we could be the only ones, but I’d hate to say that in case there’s one in Budapest doing the same thing,” she joked.

Now she and Callendar can get people clued in on gay artists and help present them to the rest of the world. Right now, the site features five hours of streaming video from various artists. They are working on putting more up, but that costs money. Right now, the site is all out of pocket. “We wanted to get it rolling and didn’t want anything to stop us, so basically we went with LiveStream, a free channel. Five hours is all we can do right now for free but that’s still a lot,” she said. “We’re going to work on getting a sponsor or some funding and bring it to a totally different level. With advertisers or money coming in, we can have better streaming and more storage capacity.”

Which means right now, they have to put up with Google ads on the page and in the stream. “Yeah. Sometimes we get Billy Graham ads that pop up,” she said.

Yikes — someone get them cash quick!

—  Rich Lopez

Dallas Video Fest goes a little gay, but just a little

For 23 years, the Dallas Video Fest has offered up a strongly diverse selections of work both local and from afar. These kinds of indie projects are prime territory for LGBT filmmakers, and the DVF, thankfully, doesn’t shy away from gay content. This year, though, the selections seem slimmer than in the past … though that doesn’t mean they are less interesting.

This crop of films have certain gay appeal whether it’s behind the camera or on the screen.

Ain’t I A Woman? — Brad Sanders directs this short which follows Lesley, a transgender doll during her transformation. In four minutes, Sanders takes a look at gender and the societal notions that come with it. (Friday at 10:30 p.m.)

Nothing Happened, pictured — This tale by Julia Kots about two best friends played at L.A.’s
OutFest earlier this year. Barb has a secret to tell Liza but they aren’t sure if they want to go there just yet. (Friday at 10:30 p.m.)

Deep Ellum Mural Project — When DART tore down the Deep Ellum tunnel for its new station, people were crushed. That turned around when artists teamed with DART and the new mural was born. Lesbian artist Cathey Miller is one of the locals with her work gracing the piece. (Saturday at 3:45 p.m.)

The Jeff Koons Show — The pop artist gives his own perspective on himself in Alison Chernick’s profile. Gay artist Chuck Close and painter/filmmaker Julian Schnabel also weigh in on his work which you might recognize as stainless steel balloon animals or the famous gay animals photography he did for New York Times Magazine this spring. (Saturday at 6 p.m.)

Fragments From Death Comes for Britney Spears! The Musical — OK, really, this has the three words needed for any gay man to come out and watch. Britney. Spears. Musical.  The DVF describes it though as a parody on the singer amid a world of gossip. (Saturday at 9 p.m.)

The t.a.T.u. Project — This doc by Jesper Nordahl looks at the pop duo from Russia and their marketing as a same-sex couple against a political background. (Saturday at 10 p.m.)

Seven Songs About Thunder — Jennifer Reeder’s film follows three women coming to terms with death, motherhood and even their sexual selves. Apparently one scene in which a mother calls and leaves messages on her dead daughter’s phone will leave you feeling creeped out. But that’s just what we hear. (Sunday at 4:05 p.m.)

Dallas Art City — Players in the Big D art scene open up with their memories and perspectives of visual arts and what they mean to the city. This is an excerpt from a full-length doc that will premiere later this year. (Sunday at 7:30 p.m.)

— Rich Lopez

The Dallas Video Fest runs through Sunday at the Angelika Film Center, 5321 E. Mockingbird Lane. Passes $25–$75. For a complete schedule of films and events, visit Videofest.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 24, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas