Dallas Film Society to honor Lee Daniels

Lee DanielsAt the Dallas International Film Festival earlier this year, Dallas Film Society’s artistic director, James Faust, came up to me beaming: “I hope you’re happy,” he said. “I programmed the festival with you in mind.”

He was kidding, but he was justly pleased that DIFF had tons of gay content (and most of it good!). Well, Dallas Film goes gay again. This morning they announced that Lee Daniels, the Academy Award-nominated director of Precious, The Paperboy and (no surprise here) Lee Daniels’ The Butler, will be this year’s honoree at the annual fundraiser, The Art of Film.

The openly gay filmmaker often addresses LGBT issues in his films, especially The Paperboy (an underrated gem), and the even will screen one of his films (the title has not been released). Daniels himself will be in attendance.

For more information go here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

DTC’s ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ tonight at the Wyly

Masterpiece theater

There’s much to like about Dallas Theater Center’s current production of this stage adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird. (It’s a co-production with Casa Manana; its version closed last month, and while this one has almost the same cast and crew, it’s strikingly different.) Act 2 is the money, with an unparalleled courtroom scene and a profound coda about the mysterious Boo Radley.

Several of the performances are indelible as well. Anastasia Munoz, as a clucking society lady but mostly as the white girl who accuses a hapless black man of rape, quakes with such nervous ferocity, you fear she’ll shake loose a light fixture. Akron Watson as the victim of her prejudice and James Dybas as her racist father are equally good, and solid work comes from Bob Hess, Denise Lee and Morgan Richards as the precious tomboy Scout. But the production is all but stolen by Aiden Langford as the moppet Dill, a charming kid who could spread diabetes with his sweetness.

—  Rich Lopez

HRC Learns Precious 7-Year-Old Boy Can Drum Up Emotional Donations

Remember Malcolm, the adorable seven-year-old boy whose parents gave him $ 140 to donate to charities of his choice, and he decided to split the cash between the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center and the Human Rights Campaign? Over 1,000 of you shared our post on your Facebook walls, so it certainly resonated. Earlier this month the Center shot out an e-blast alerting members to Malcolm's story (including cute photo) and calling on its supporters to do as Malcolm did and throw some cash to a good cause. I can't be sure, but I'd wager a guess the Center collected a decent amount of cash from the campaign. HRC, the other organization Malcolm donated to, appeared to sit on this opportunity, but we knew it was coming: Two days ago HRC chief Joe Solmonese signed his name to an email asking, "Will you match Malcolm's commitment to equality by donating $ 70 as well?" For some reason, when the Center does it, it seems charming; when HRC does it, it seems exploitative. But maybe that's just because HRC is exploitative.


Permalink | Post a comment | Add to del.icio.us


Tagged: , , , ,

Queerty

—  David Taffet