Bill would protect gun-toting fetuses from prosecution in South Dakota

Rep. Phil Jensen

A bill to expand the definition of justifiable homicide was scheduled to be debated in the South Dakota House of Representatives today. The proposal is to allow murder if it happened while resisting an attempt to harm a fetus.

Supporters say the bill would prevent harm to the unborn, according to the Rapid City Journal. Unfortunately, harm will probably come to the born.

“This is a bill that will provide self-defense for the unborn child,” said Rep. Phil Jensen, the bill’s Republican sponsor.

Well, not really — not unless the fetus has a weapon or knows karate, since self-defense is when people protect themselves. Should a gun-toting fetus practice self-defense, chances are the mother would be severely injured, unless the fetus has learned to shoot directly out the vagina. Jensen didn’t say whether the bill includes finding new parents for the newly orphaned infant.

—  David Taffet

Va. closes new enrollment for AIDS drug program

Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. — The Virginia Department of Health says that it’s been forced to close new enrollment into its AIDS Drug Assistance Program, which provides HIV-related medication for low-income people.

There are some exceptions, including allowing pregnant women and children 18 years old and younger to continue to enroll in the program. The department also reduced the number of drugs the program covers.

Virginia funds 14 percent of the $21.6 million program; the federal government covers the vast majority.

The Roanoke Times reports that Health Commissioner Karen Remley wrote in a December letter to health providers that ADAP won’t be able to keep pace with demand.

“ADAP is not categorized as an entitlement program, and therefore, funding is insufficient to provide medication coverage for all low-income or uninsured individuals. The current financial situation is now requiring even greater reliance upon the manufacturers’ patient assistance programs (PAPs),” she wrote.

State figures show that about 4,200 Virginians used ADAP last year.

Health officials say the number of Virginians living with HIV has increased 44 percent since 2000. About 64 percent lack health insurance, which would cover their treatments and medications.

—  John Wright