Q Cinema bestows festival awards

iamdivine_Andrew_CurtisQ Cinema was last weekend; the films are done, but the accolades continue. The 15th annual festival has announced the winners of its annual awards. Here’s the list:

Best overall film: G.B.F.

Best dramatic filmMeth Head

Best comedy film: Southern Baptist Sissies

Best documentary: I Am Divine

Best dramatic shortThe Kiss

Best comedic shortDirty Talk

Audience Choice awardBreaking Through

Shawn A. Moore PrizeBirthday Cake

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

More Q Cinema scoop: ‘Something Real’

realSouthern Baptist Sissies is the main attraction at Q Cinema tonight, but it’s not the only film screening. It is preceded by the short Something Real. Part music video, part withering internal monologue, it features celebrity stars from Rex Lee to Jack Plotnick to Coco Peru to Bruce Vilanch, as well as music from Tony winner Jeff Marx (Avenue Q). Writer-director Guy Shalem looks into the minds of a cross-section of gay guys at a dick-dancer bar as they reveal the secret thoughts they have about sex, themselves and each other. It’s full of hilarious observations (some quite judgmental — surprise) and smoothly executed — a total hoot.

And look in Dallas Voice tomorrow (print and online) for reviews and previews of additional films playing at Q Cinema, as well as an interview with founder Todd Camp.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

WATCH: “Southern Baptist Sissies’ trailer, at Q Cinema Thursday

This week, I reviewed Southern Baptist Sissies, Del Shores’ filmed version of his play, which opens the 15th Q Cinema tomorrow night. To help prime the pump for the event, then, I offer you the film’s trailer, after the break.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Q Cinema announces 2013 schedule

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Emerson Collins in ‘Southern Baptist Sissies’

For years, Q Cinema’s annual four-day festival of gay and lesbian films has taken place in June, but this year, the group moved its 15th festival to the autumn, to coincide with Tarrant County Pride, running Oct. 10–13. Here’s the line-up of major screenings and events:

Opening night: Del Shores’ filmed stage version of his play Southern Baptist Sissies, with Shores and co-star/producer Emerson Collins, pictured, in attendance, opens the weekend.

Friday, Oct. 11: Submerge, an Australian film that explores Gen Y lesbians; I’m a Stripper, Charlie David’s documentary of, well, you can figure it out; Birthday Cake, a follow-up to last year’s hit Groom’s Cake.

Saturday, Oct. 12: Breaking Through, a documentary that features Fort Worth Councilman Joel Burns; Test, a film set in San Francisco at the height of the AIDS epidemic; the shorts program; and a QLive performance of the play Standing on Ceremony, which played at the Out of the Loop Fringe Festival last spring.

Sunday, Oct. 13: The films Meth Head, I Am Divine and G.B.F. close out the festival.

All showings are at the Rose Marine Theatre. You can get tickets and learn more about the festival here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

“Raid of the Rainbow Lounge” wins awards, books anniversary screening at Magnolia

Raid of the Rainbow Lounge, the documentary about the event that triggered a renewed passion for gay rights in North Texas, has won two recent awards. Earlier this month, it took the Audience Choice Award at Fort Worth’s Q Cinema; then a week later, it took Best GLBT FIlm at the 32nd Breckenridge Festival of Film in Colorado. The latter, mind you, is not a gay film fest at all, but a mainstream one with a gay category.

The film has already screened thrice North Texas — at a world premiere this past spring in Sundance Square, a Dallas premiere in April and at Q Cinema on June 1 – but you still have another chance to see it: Raid will screen in Dallas on June 28 — the third anniversary of the actual raid — at Landmark’s Magnolia Theatre. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion featuring many of the actual parties involved in the raid and its aftermath. You can purchase tickets in advance exclusively here.

View the trailer of the film, narrated by out TV icon Meredith Baxter, after the jump.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

This week’s takeaways: Life+Style

Fort Worth’s Q Cinema got underway last night with the screening of the period drama Funkytown, but there’s plenty of good programming all weekend long. And while you’re in Cowtown, check out some of the performances at the Fort Worth Opera (if you haven’t already, send in your email to win tickets to some performances this weekend.)

If you prefer to stick closer to Dallas, Paula Poundstone is performing Saturday night at the Lakewood Theater. And if you haven’t seen it already — seriously!?!? — Mamma Mia is playing at Fair Park Music Hall, courtesy of Dallas Summer Musicals. Tonight at Revive is the latest Gay Dallas Happy Hour, starting at 5 p.m., with DJ Paul Kraft spinning (the food is worth a bite, too).

There’re some leather events this weekend as well, from the spank-happy Butt Busters leather event on Saturday to the Women’s International Leatherfest, going on all weekend. And Snow White and the Huntsman is the summer movie you wanna catch (complete with a Hemsworth, pictured) before Prometheus comes out next week.

Stealing a little god-of-thunder from Marvel’s announcement that its gay Northstar superhero would get hitched later this month, DC Comics has outed the Green Lantern as gay. He certainly has always had fashion sense. And it may erase some memories of the Ryan Reynolds movie from last year.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

“Tomboy” screens tonight in Fort Worth

Q Cinema’s weekend-long festival returns to Fort Worth in May, with an encore screening of Raid of the Rainbow Lounge, but until then, the weekly screenings are still going strong. Tonight’s offering is Tomboy, a coming-of-age drama about trans youth. Laurie is a 10-year-old girl who leads her classmates in her new neighborhood believe she is actually a boy; consequences, poignant and sad, arise. The French film won awards at the Seattle Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, as well as the Berlin Film Festival. It plays tonight at 8 p.m. at the Four Day Weekend Theater. For more information, visit QCinema.org.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

QLive! holds auditions for stage version of “Mulligans”

Mulligans was one of the more charming and poignant gay independent movies to come out in recent years —  a summer romance between a young man and his friend’s father ends in heartbreak. The screenplay was written by actor Charlie David, who appeared on Dante’s Cove and hosts the travel series Bump! Now David has adapted it for the stage, and QLive! (the theatrical arm of Fort Worth’s Q Cinema) is putting it on.

A staged reading of the adaptation will be part of QLive’s June lineup, and the group will be holding auditions for the six roles — two men in their early 20s, a man in his 40s, a woman in her 40s, a girl in her early 20s and an 8-year-old girl — on March 31 at the Celebration Community Church, 908 Pennsylvania Ave. from 2 to 5 p.m. To find out more, visit QCinema.org.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

“Wise Kids” kicks of Q Cinema’s spring series

Q Cinema’s spring multi-day festival is just around the corner, but you can get a taste of queer cinema with The Wise Kids, February’s monthly screening in Fort Worth, in Wednesday.

The coming-of-age comedy-drama — about three Church kids confronting one’s homosexuality — was an award-winner at the gay OutFest film festival last year. It’s a savvy look at Christianity confronting the real world. Tickets are $10. The screening is at Four Day Weekend Theatre at 312 Houston St. in Cowtown, starting at 8 p.m.

The other films and dates in the spring series are:

• Tomboy on March 28

Kawa on April 25.

For more information, visit QCinema.org.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

WaterTower announces line-up for Out of the Loop Fringe Festival coming this March

WaterTower Theatre in Addison brings back its Out of the Loop Fringe Festival for 11 days in March, and as always, there’s some gay content among the two-dozen performances. Among the highlights:

Bill Bowers, Beyond Words and a mime workshop. The gay mime — and really, he makes miming cool — returns again with his solo show which had an off-Broadway run last fall. It’s not all silent, as Bowers walks us through, with music, monologues and movement, what it means to be a boy. He will also conduct a workshop on March 10 instructing those interested in learning the art of mime and creative motion.

Charles Ross, Lord of the Rings. Two years ago, Ross performed his one-man, hour-long “summary” of the Star Wars Trilogy at OOTL; now he returns to condense all 11-plus hours of the Lord of the Rings Trilogy, pictured, into a 65-minute show.

Kevin J. Thornton, Strange Dreamz. A performance piece from Thorton that includes standup and music about life as a gay man.

• Outcry Theatre, dark play or story for boys. Nick, a lonely teen, pretend to be the girl of 16-year-old Adam’s dreams in a play about online fantasy.

QLive!, Sweet Eros. Q Cinema’s live performance arm stages Terrence McNally’s play about sexual obsession.

Stella Productions, A Most Happy Stella. Several short plays about plays, including A Streetcar Named Desire, from gay playwright David Parr.

• Also, cabaret staple Amy Stevenson performs her song stylings in the lobby during the run of the festival.

Tickets are available here.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones