Out & Equal to honor Parker, Welts

Mayor Annise Parker

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates will honor Houston Mayor Annise Parker and Golden State Warriors President Rick Welts at its Leadership Celebration on March 14 in San Francisco.

In October, Out & Equal held its week-long Workplace Summit at the Hilton Anatole in Dallas. Because of rave reviews, the group plans to return in the next few years. Welts was among the speakers at the Dallas convention.

Now in its fifth year, the Leadership Celebration is a fundraising event that includes a hosted reception and dinner. Parker and Welts will be recognized as role models and inspirations in the movement to achieve equality in the workforce.

To attend the San Francisco event, register online.

The 2012 Workplace Summit will be in Baltimore on from Oct. 29-Nov 1.

—  David Taffet

Want to Get Gay Married at 35,000 Feet? Scandinavia’s Airline Wants to Throw Your Reception Over The Atlantic

Nepal may have just celebrated its first-ever legal gay wedding, but who's going to be the first same-sex couple to get hitched at 35,000 feet? Scandinavia's SAS Airlines is offering one European and one American couple a free flight and honeymoon package to tie the knot on one of their A340S as it flies between Stockholm and New York in December as part of its new "Love Is In The Air" marketing campaign.

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Queerty

—  John Wright

President Obama: 'Change never comes [from] — or at least never begins — in Washington'

President Obama on Tuesday spoke to a group of LGBT activists who were invited to a reception at the White House in honor of National Gay Pride Month.

Above is a video, released by the White House, of the president’s remarks during that reception. And here are a few of the highlights from his speech:

“Now, look, the fact that we’ve got activists here is important because it’s a reminder that change never comes — or at least never begins in – Washington. It begins with acts of compassion — and sometimes defiance — across America. It begins when ordinary people — out of love for a mother or a father, son or daughter, or husband or wife — speak out against injustices that have been accepted for too long. And it begins when these impositions of conscience start opening hearts that had been closed, and when we finally see each other’s humanity, whatever our differences. Now, this struggle is as old as America itself. It’s never been easy. But standing here, I am hopeful. …

“Because I believe in committed — I believe that committed gay and lesbian couples deserve the same rights and responsibilities afforded to any married couple in this country, I have called for Congress to repeal the so-called Defense of Marriage Act.  We are pushing hard to pass an inclusive employee non-discrimination bill. No one in America should be fired because they’re gay. It’s not right, it’s not who we are as Americans, and we are going to put a stop to it.

“And finally, we’re going to end ‘don’t ask don’t tell.’ That is a promise I made as a candidate. It is a promise that I reiterated as president.  It’s one that this administration is going to keep. Now, the only way to lock this in — the only way to get the votes in Congress to roll back this policy — is if we work with the Pentagon, who are in the midst of two wars.”

—  admin