REVIEW: ‘Liz & Dick’

Lohan has the look, but not the style, in Lifetime biopic

The train wreck that has become Lindsay Lohan didn’t start out that way. She was handily the most gifted pop princess of her incoming class, with a throaty voice that conveyed maturity; she even picked good projects, like Mean Girls, and held her own opposite Meryl Streep in A Prairie Home Companion. After all her drug and legal problems, the decision to rehabilitate (her career, at least) by doing a biopic of Elizabeth Taylor seemed like a savvy one: Both actresses were dogged by paparazzi, substance abuse and personal tragedy. Surely Lohan would bring her own experience to bear. And she looked the part, clearly. I was excited.

And now, disappointed with Liz & Dick, the Lifetime movie (airing Sunday) that was to be her comeback.

Aside from the “look,” Lohan lacks most of Taylor’s essential qualities — most specifically, the volcanic passion percolating under a slightly icy exterior. Taylor was never earthy and warm, like Ava Gardner or Rita Hayworth, but unattainable; imagine her in that white slip from Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, and you can see the formula of sexuality and porcelain perfection that she was — a brunetted and more talented version of Marilyn Monroe.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Elizabeth Taylor still giving to people with HIV/AIDS

Elizabeth Taylor, second from left, and AIDS Services of Dallas Executive Director Don Maison, far right, at Dillards at NorthPark Center in Dallas in 1996.

The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation will get a big infusion of cash this week as a result of an auction of jewelry.

Elizabeth Taylor, who died March 23, 2011, had a collection of jewelry that was estimated to be worth $20 million. The auction has already brought in $116 million.

The auction is going on at Christie’s in New York.

Among the jewels sold was a pearl purchased by Richard Burton for $37,000, which sold for $11.6 million. The pearl had once been owned by Mary Tudor and was painted in the 17th century by Diego Valezquez.

Taylor co-founded AmFAR in 1985 and began The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation in 1991, with a focus on direct service to people living with HIV. AIDS Services Dallas, Bryan’s House and AIDS Arms have been recipients of grants from that organization.

—  David Taffet