Congregation Beth El Binah rings in the new year

Fisch.Rabbi-Steve

Happy 5772.

Congregation Beth El Binah celebrates Rosh HaShanah, literally “Head of the Year,” with services at the Gay and Lesbian Community Center at 8 p.m. today and 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Services will be conducted by Rabbi Steve Fisch (right), who was hired by the synagogue earlier this summer. The morning service will be followed by a catered lunch. Anyone is welcome to attend services.

Rosh HaShanah, the New Year, begins a month of holidays on the Jewish calendar.

Oct. 1 is Shabbat Shuvah, the sabbath that falls between Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur. That Shabbat is considered the most holy Shabbat of the year.

Yom Kippur or Day of Atonement, on Saturday, Oct. 8, is considered the holiest day of the year and is marked with services all day and fasting. The first service is Kol Nidre at 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 7. Services resume Saturday at 10 a.m. Yizkor service, the service of remembrance, begins at 5 p.m. Break the fast will be at the community center at sunset.

—  David Taffet

Happy Rockin’ Rosh Hashanah Eve

Crappy wine is part of every Jewish celebration

Rosh Hashanah literally means Head (rosh) of the (ha) Year (shanah) or New Year. The holiday starts at sundown on Wednesday, Sept. 8 this year.

The holiday is celebrated on the first day of the month of Tishrei, the seventh month of the year on the Jewish calendar.

So what’s up with that crazy Jewish calendar? Well I thought I’d answer some questions you might have been too polite to ask in the most smart-ass, but accurate, way.

How do I wish someone a good holiday?

That’s the No. 1 I’m asked every year.

Right:

Happy holidays.

Happy New Year.

Happy Rosh Hashanah.

Have a good few days off! See you Monday!

Also appropriate:

Are you getting together with your family?

You going to Florida for a few days?

Tell me again, is this a happy holiday?

Doesn’t God frown on taking a cruise during the holidays rather than going to temple?

Wrong:

You god damn Jews get so many holidays. (However, that’s the one I’ve been greeted with many times by well-meaning … well, you know who you are).

—  David Taffet