Events to benefit Legacy Counseling

Angels battle devils in kickball game; Be An Angel brings Christmas in September

HEAVENLY DEMONS | DFW Sisters Kerianna Kross, left, and MaeLyn Hanzment have a heavenly plan to cheat their way to victory against Dallas Diablos Todd Hopkins, center, David Whitehead and Molly Whitman.

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer
taffet@dallasvoice.com

Two fundraising events this week benefit Legacy Counseling Center: The DFW Sisters have challenged the Dallas Diablos rugby team to a Sunday game of kickball. Then on Tuesday, Be An Angel takes place in Deep Ellum.

What do the rough-and-tumble Diablos and the ever-so-spiritual Sisters have in common? The Diablos, who play one of the roughest team sports, compete in the not-gay Texas Rugby Union and participate in the International Gay Rugby Association. Part of their mission is to forge friendships and celebrate differences.

And nothing in Dallas could be more different than The DFW Sisters, a mission of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. But that group is also dedicated to respecting diversity. And both groups include fundraising for community organizations as part of their core mission.

So what else could the Diablos do but accept the challenge when The Sisters invited them to play a game of kickball for charity?

“What a fun and zany way to raise money for Legacy,” said Legacy Executive Director Melissa Grove. “I applaud their ability to create a new and fresh event. I’ve been doing this a long time and this is the first time I’ve seen anything like this.”

James Maggard, also known as Sister MaeLynn Hanzment, acknowledged a possible physical advantage that favored the Diablos.

“The only way we’re going to win is if we cheat,” he said. “So we’re fully intending to do that.”

But there are rules — established kickball rules. And kickball is actually played in Dallas with official referees keeping things honest. If one of those referees is on hand, as Maggard hopes, he may just have his hands full.

That would just add to the fun, Maggard said, fully intending to get around any attempt to keep the game honest.

An attendance fee of $5 is requested to watch the game. Additional donations will buy wild cards. Bigger donations may help one team or the other.

“Wild cards can add points, score outs, replace the ball or turn a Diablo into a Sister,” Maggard said. For a larger donation, a Diablo will switch teams and play for the Sisters in full makeup. Maggard admitted that the makeup would be a rush job.

Dallas Diablo Paul Ryan said the idea for the event came from friends in Seattle where the Seattle Quake rugby team played the Seattle Sisters in a game of kickball and raised several thousand dollars.

He expects to have a good showing from both the men’s and women’s Diablo teams.

And if The Sisters do cheat, Ryan had a perfect solution: “We’ll cheat ourselves,” he said.

The game takes place at Glencoe Park between Ellsworth and Martel avenues near Central Expressway and Mockingbird Lane.

A victory party at the Hidden Door follows the game. Victory? Both teams figure they’ve won if they raise some money for Legacy

Be An Angel

On Tuesday, Sept. 13, the 17th annual Be An Angel auction returns to Monica’s Aca y Alla on Main Street in Deep Ellum. The evening features dinner, a live and silent auction and music by Vince Martinez.

Jazzy baritone Martinez was a regular performer at Ciudad on Oak Lawn Avenue and has since performed around the United States.

Clear Channel Radio Public Affairs Director Anna De Haro hosts the event.

Be An Angel began in 1994 just before Christmas with an auction. Although moved to earlier in the year this time, the evening will still have a holiday theme.
Among the auction items this year are a signed guitar from Rascal Flatts, a dinner party for 10 prepared by celebrity chef Joanne Bondy and a cocktail party for 20 from Hudson Ferus Vodka and Bar10.

Grove said the event is a great way to get some Christmas shopping done early while helping out a good cause at the same time.

Kickball at Field No. 1, Glencoe Park, 5300 Martel Ave. Sept. 11 at 2 p.m. $5.

Be An Angel at Monica’s Aca y Alla, 2914 Main St. Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. $40.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 9, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

theirTWOdads

For co-parenting couple Tyler Scoresby and Jonathan Ingram, every day feels like Father’s Day

A FAMILY UPSIDE-DOWN | Jonathan Ingram, left, with 6-year-old Brett and biological dad Tyler Scoresby, right, with 8-year-old Ella, show how a family with two gay dads can be a rough-and-tumble affair — and the kids seem to love it. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

ARNOLD WAYNE JONES  | Life+Style Editor
jones@dallasvoice.com

The story of Tyler Scoresby and Jonathan Ingram, like all good gay love stories, started at the gym.

That’s where Ingram, a graphic designer, and Scoresby, a physician, met more than three years ago, not long after Scoresby came out and divorced his wife of seven years. Scoresby dated a few men before Ingram, “but he was the first to express a definite interest in meeting my kids.”

“Before he’d let me get involved with them, he kind of interviewed me!” Ingram says.

“I told him, there are times when I’ll have the kids but you may want to go out with friends. But he was really clear about wanting to be a dad with me,” Scoresby says.

And that’s exactly what they are now.

Currently, the couple (they legally wed in Provincetown, Mass., last September) share custody with Scoresby’s ex-wife, getting the kids — Ella, 8, and Brett, 6 — every Thursday, the first, third and fifth weekend each month, select holidays and all of July (“a traditional set-up,” Scoresby calls it). And they will have them this Sunday, June 19 — Father’s Day. But honestly, they don’t expect to make a big deal out of it.

“We have no major plans,” Scoresby says, 35. “We have fun every weekend. When there are two parents [in a heterosexual household], the woman usually the kids to celebrate Father’s Day. But it’s just us celebrating each other.”

“We keep them active all the time,” Ingram adds. “We do crafts, play on the trampoline, take road trips,” including one next month to California to see the Redwood Forest. And being that there are two fit, athletic men leading this household, roughhousing is the rule, not the exception. The kids seem to love it.

Scoresby calls Ingram “a perfect partner in parenting. Neither of us has a defined role. We don’t try to compare it to a straight relationship.”

The children have taken to Ingram whole-heartedly. They call Scoresby “Daddy” and Ingram “Jonathan,” but both act, and are treated, like full parents.

“A lot of times I think they like him better than they do me,” Scoresby jokes. “They respect him like a parent and he loves them like one.”

Ingram, now 41, had been interested in having children when he was younger, “but you put it aside when you come out. If I was going to have kids, it was not going to be an easy road.” He came from a fairly large family himself, which included one adopted sister.

Meeting Tyler, Ella and Brett presented an opportunity to be the dad he always wanted to be.

“Parenting comes naturally for me,” he says. “I get to do the same stuff as Tyler without dealing with the divorce. Everything else I deal with — motivating them, teaching them how to ride bikes, cleaning up after them, reading books to them at night or dealing with a nightmare — is the same.”

But they do try to operate under a different set of rules. Both had been reared in nurturing but conservative straight households that put an emphasis on values, and saw aspects of parenting they liked. But they wanted to achieve those goals their own way.

“When there aren’t set roles, it gives you a lot of freedom,” Ingram says. “For instance, there are many ways to be a moral person that are not tied to religion. So every Sunday morning [when we have them], we spend about an hour and a half on what we call ‘human time.’ We like to think of it as the next generation of parenting.”

BOUNCE | One advantage in a two-dad household? Lots of fun physical activities, like jumping on the backyard trampoline. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

They did worry at first about how to introduce Ingram as Daddy’s partner, though that has ended up being unexpectedly easy.

“Because they were so young [when we met], they really don’t remember what their lives were like before me,” Ingram says. “We certainly show affection around them like any straight parents would.” About a year into the relationship, they read Ella And Tango Makes Three, a children’s book about a family of same-sex penguins.

“Ella was already around clearly defined families and we wanted to make sure she could always tell her friends, ‘Yeah, I have two dads,’” Ingram says. “We said, ‘Do you understand our family is a little different, but that doesn’t mean we are less or bad?’ She pointed at the penguins and said, ‘That’s me, that’s you, that’s Daddy.’ It was like she already got it.”

That’s one reason you won’t hear the dads talk down to Ella and Brett. They explain honestly why someone is there to photograph them, and both kids pose like burgeoning runway models. And they are excited to start human time soon.

It’s all going so well, in fact, the couple have talked about having more kids, whether through adoption or surrogacy. But whatever they decide, one thing is certain: With two men in the house, every day feels like Father’s Day.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition June 17, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens