Golden Globe winners have a gay ol’ time

The Golden Globes had an entertaining opening number parodying ‘La La Land,’ which went on to win seven awards, a record number in the history of the awards.

The Golden Globe awards did something unusual last night — it entertained not as a drunken rude trainwreck but as a funny festival of film (and TV). Following the opening parody musical number — wherein the typically puppy-whiny host Jimmy Fallon did an extended tribute to nominee La La Land — Fallon got off some terrific one-liners, many jibing the President-Elect. (Look forward to the brain-damaged tweets to critique it).

The award packs some early surprises. Frontrunner best picture Moonlight lost its first category, for best supporting actor nominee Mahershala Ali, to the excellent Aaron Taylor-Johnson for director Tom Ford’s chilling Nocturnal Animals. (Taylor-Johnson bested some of the best nominees of the night, including Jeff Bridges for Hell or High Water, Simon Helberg for Florence Foster Jenkins and Dev Patel for Lion.)

It wasn’t all bad news for Moonlight, though — the film ended up with one win: Best Motion Picture/Drama. It was also my No. 1 film of 2016.

Viola Davis was a popular sentimental win for Fences (supporting actress), but the most heartfelt moment of the night was surely Ryan Gosling, winner as best actor in a musical or comedy for La La Land, in his acceptance speech honoring his wife for all of her sacrifices as he pursued his career.

That wasn’t the film’s only win, though. Best song and score went to La La Land, including out co-lyricist Benj Pasek, whose writing partner Justin Paul tributed “to musical theater nerds everywhere,” as well as to writer-director Damien Chazelle for his screenplay and as best director, actress Emma Stone and best comedy motion picture for a total of seven awards — a record. (Barring ties, no film could win more than nine or ten; no TV show could win more than five.)

As expected, Casey Affleck won best actor in a drama for Manchester by the Sea. He’s the unchallenged frontrunner for the Oscar. The brooding French actress Isabelle Huppert won for the thriller Elle.

Zootopia was the surprise winner for animated feature (opposite Moana, Sing and Kubo and the Two Strings) but it did give the film’s gay director, Byron Howard, the opportunity to thank his husband.

In the TV category, Atlanta (my No. 2 show of 2916) stood out among a lot of gay-friendly series to take best comedy series and best actor for series creator Donald Glover, while out actress Sarah Paulson won best actress in a miniseries portraying Marcia Clark in The People v O.J. Simpson, which also won best limited series (my No. 5 show). It was out-matched by three wins for The Night Manager (actor/miniseries, supporting actor and supporting actress). The Crown on Netflix won best actress/drama (Claire Foy) and best drama series.

Meryl Streep won the Cecil B. DeMille Award for career achievement, delivering a powerful, political speech.

Here are all the winners.

Motion Pictures

Supporting Actor: Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Nocturnal Animals.

Original Score: La La Land.

Original Song: “City of Stars” La La Land.

Supporting Actress: Viola Davis, Fences.

Actor/Comedy: Ryan Gosling, La La Land.

ScreenplayLa La Land.

Byron Howard, right, thanked his husband while accepting the Golden Globe for ‘Zootopia.’

Animated Feature: Zootopia.

Foreign Film: Elle.

Director: Damien Chazelle, La La Land.

Actress/Comedy: Emma Stone, La La Land.

Motion Picture/Comedy: La La Land.

Actor/Drama: Casey Affleck, Manchester by the Sea.

Actress/Drama: Isabelle Huppert, Elle.

Motion Picture/Drama: Moonlight.

 

Television

Actor/Drama: Billy Bob Tornton, Goliath.

Actress/Comedy: Tracee Ellis Ross, Blackish.

Series/Comedy: Atlanta.

Sarah Paulson, winner for best actress in a miniseries, for playing Marcia Clark in ‘The People vs. O.J. Simpson.’

Actress/Miniseries: Sarah Paulson, The People vs. O.J. Simpson.

Miniseries or TV MovieThe People vs. O.J. Simpson.

Supporting Actor: Hugh Laurie, The Night Manager.

Supporting Actress: Olivia Colman, The Night Manager.

Actor/Miniseries: Tom Hiddleston, The Night Manager.

Actress/Drama: Claire Foy, The Crown.

Series/Drama: The Crown.

Actor/Comedy: Donald Glover, Atlanta.

 

Cecil B. DeMille Award: Meryl Streep.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

AUDIO: Kluwe’s marriage equality PSA

Chris Kluwe, the one straight athlete every gay person should know, recorded a promo for marriage equality in his home state of Minnesota, where he plays for the Vikings. Gay.net has the audio. Listen here.

P.S. Who else thinks Ryan Gosling has to play him in the movie?

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Electronica popsters STRFKR talks its gay bar origins before tonight’s show at Prophet Bar

Last year, Starfucker (or STRFKR for short) released its impressive  sophomore album Reptilians, a trippy endeavor that showed some interesting growth since their 2008 self-titled debut. Dare I say, they sound like what Pink Floyd might have if they had gone the synthy-dreamy route.

Bassist Shawn Glassford, above far right, took a few moments to talk about their first show ever at the San Francisco Eagle, how they might fare at our own Dallas Eagle and whether he would top or bottom for Ryan Gosling.

Read our Q&A after the jump. Then catch them at The Prophet Bar tonight with Painted Palms and Alexico.

—  Rich Lopez

Movie Monday: ‘The Ides of March’ in wide release

Ryan’s hope

Set during a presidential primary, it’s little more than a middling episode of The West Wing, laden down with a weak performance by Evan Rachel Wood, a contrived, unconvincing political scandal involving candidate George Clooney (who also directs, woodenly) and even a self-important title. Vote “no” on this ballot measure. Please, Ryan, just strip and stop trying.

Two stars.

Read the entire review here.

DEETS: Starring Ryan Gosling, George Clooney, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Rated R. 102 minutes. In wide release.

—  Rich Lopez

QUEER CLIP: ‘THE IDES OF MARCH’

Queer-PicksRyan Gosling has discovered a cool little niche for himself recently: He gives equal time to parading around shirtless showing off his abs on magazine covers and in digestible Hollywood pabulum (Crazy Stupid Love, The Notebook) and staring off blankly under the guise of acting in regrettable art films (Drive, All Good Things). That formula has won him praise by easily fooled critics, who appear to be the target audience for The Ides of March, a slow and pretentious political thriller in which Gosling gets to be the love interest and the intellectual hero, all without betraying anything bordering on genuine emotion.

Set during a presidential primary, it’s little more than a middling episode of The West Wing, laden down with a weak performance by Evan Rachel Wood, a contrived, unconvincing political scandal involving candidate George Clooney (who also directs, woodenly) and even a self-important title. Vote “no” on this ballot measure. Please, Ryan, just strip and stop trying.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Two stars. In wide release.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition October 7, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Movie Monday: ‘All Good Things’ in the Angelika

Murder in Texas?

Quick, name the artsy Ryan Gosling movie out now about a troubled man and his complex sexual relationship with a blonde — and they have sex in a shower. Yeah, maybe you said Blue Valentine, but you could have said All Good Things. Gosling’s character here trades up the social ladder but down the well-adjusted scale with AGT, inspired by the life of Texas-based killer (and sometime cross-dresser) Robert Durst.

Gosling plays the Durst character, here called David Marks, the scion of an abrasive, wealthy New York slumlord (Frank Langella). David reluctantly enters the family business once he meets Katie (Kirsten Dunst), basically serving as bag-man for his dad’s collections arm. Dad is disapproving of him, and looks disdainfully on Katie, which only exacerbates David’s isolation, as well as his spiraling psychological instability.

Read the rest of the review here.

DEETS: All Good Things. Rated R. 110 minutes. Angelika Film Center at the Mockingbird Station.

—  Rich Lopez

SCREEN REVIEW: ‘All Good Things’

DISAPPEARING ACTS | Katie (Kirsten Dunst) has a troubled relationship with David (Ryan Gosling) until both eventually disappear — she goes missing, and he begins living as a woman in Texas.

Murder in Texas?

… or maybe New York … or maybe not at all. Cross-dressing Durst case gets muddled, fictionalized investigation in the unfocused ‘All Good Things’

ARNOLD WAYNE JONES  | Life+Style Editor
jones@dallasvoice.com

Quick, name the artsy Ryan Gosling movie out now about a troubled man and his complex sexual relationship with a blonde — and they have sex in a shower. Yeah, maybe you said Blue Valentine, but you could have said All Good Things. Gosling’s character here trades up the social ladder but down the well-adjusted scale with AGT, inspired by the life of Texas-based killer (and sometime cross-dresser) Robert Durst.

Gosling plays the Durst character, here called David Marks, the scion of an abrasive, wealthy New York slumlord (Frank Langella). David reluctantly enters the family business once he meets Katie (Kirsten Dunst), basically serving as bag-man for his dad’s collections arm. Dad is disapproving of him, and looks disdainfully on Katie, which only exacerbates David’s isolation, as well as his spiraling psychological instability.

Their turbulent relationship ends with Katie’s disappearance (her body is never found) and Marks himself goes into hiding, living as a woman in Galveston.

A sizeable problem with All Good Things is that it can’t seem to decide whether it is A Beautiful Mind (i.e., a portrait of mental illness and its tragic consequences) or Sleeping with the Enemy (a woman trapped in a marriage to a psychotic).

If the latter, director Andrew Jarecki should have watched more Hitchcock before undertaking this, his first narrative feature. Despite some violent outbursts, there’s no sense of menace about David. He’s disturbingly off, yes, and there are overt indications of his fury (he kills a dog), but Jarecki handles these scenes dispassionately, with a documentarian’s observational detachment. The stakes simply don’t seem all that substantial.

At its heart, this is a mystery that’s unknowable, not unlike  Jarecki’s Oscar-nominated documentary Capturing the Friedmans. It should be moody and enigmatic, but actually tries to explain too much. Eventually, it edges in the direction of Sleeping with the Enemy territory, and the style morphs from portrait to potboiler. By the time David turns up living as a woman, it seems more comical than creepy.

Credit Gosling with tackling the role of David, who’s inscrutable but also pretty dull, with conviction if not passion. In his old lady clothes, he looks like a slightly more animated version of Norman Bates’ mother. Dunst, Langella and Philip Baker Hall (as David’s crabby neighbor) deliver uninteresting performances of two-dimensional characters.

The true story of Durst, as reported in the media, is more bizarre than the movie can do justice to, and the armchair psychologizing (including a posited theory that seeks to say what really happened) feels forced, and the ending is unsatisfying. There’s a great movie in his story somewhere; too bad this one isn’t it. It just cannot compete with reality.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Jan. 21, 2011.

—  John Wright

Movie review: ‘Blue Valentine’

Although Blue Valentine is about the disintegration of a straight couple’s marriage, the themes, scenes and emotions it deals with could be out of any relationship: The awkward silences, the cold touches, the largely unspoken anger, the rebuffed affection, the meaningless disagreements. There are moments of tenderness, but they are made all the sadder because we see them in flashback. It’s over for these two.

I’ve been in this kind of relationship. I’m sure most people have. And it’s not pretty.

Sound like a happy film? Yeah, it’s not. But it is very real.

It’s also the kind of film that invites “process” reviews — that is, stories about the making of the film itself and its style: the hand-held camera and improvised dialogue resulting from weeks of off-set rehearsal with stars Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams (Heath Ledger’s widow), who lived together as a married couple for weeks to get into the skins of the characters. That accounts for the realism — authenticity trumps contrivance, character supersedes plot.

You can’t call that a bad thing, but it can be difficult to watch. Cindy (Williams) and Dean (Gosling) are a young couple with a sweet 5-year-old daughter, but their marriage is failing. In fact, by the time the movie begins, it’s basically over. Both from working-class backgrounds — Dean is a housepainter and mover, Cindy is a nurse — but Cindy seems to feel trapped by Dean’s lack of ambition. She likes his goofy charm, his grand acts of romanticism, but she doesn’t seem challenged by him. “I thought the whole point of coming here was to have a night without kids,” she snipes when he takes her to a fantasy motel and begins making animal noises. Ouch.

Director Derek Cianfrance approximates John Cassavetes’ patented way of creating pained realism not from meaningful dialogue or fancy camerawork, but by intense observation of small moments between people. He hops between the beginnings of their courtship and the dissolve with only subtle visual cues. He also allows Gosling and Williams to sparkle in their roles. Both are likely Oscar contenders, so intense and measured are their performances.

Blue Valentine isn’t the best date movie, but it is, in some ways, an ideal break-up movie, one that makes you feel you’re not alone in that pain.

Now playing at Landmark’s Magnolia Theatre in the West Village. Rated R (after an original NC-17 rating for explicit sex). 118 mins.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones