Starvoice • 12.23.11

By Jack Fertig

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAY

David Sedaris turns 55 on Monday. The openly gay author first came to attention with his 1992 broadcast of his SantaLand Diaries on NPR. He’s written iconic bestsellers such as 1997’s Naked and 2000’s Me Talk Pretty One Day, but received major criticism for an article in The Guardian this past summer about exotic Chinese food and culture that was deemed insensitive.

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THIS WEEK

The sun conjoining Pluto in Capricorn heightens awareness of authority and bureaucratic structures that hem us in, as well as the revolutionary urge to smash them. Impulsive acts of rebellion are disastrous. Revolutions need careful planning.

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CAPRICORN  Dec 21-Jan 19
While your intuitions about money are on the mark it helps to double-check the facts. Avoid dithering and second-guessing yourself. Being rigorous is good; beating yourself up isn’t.

AQUARIUS  Jan 20-Feb 18
There is such a thing as being too nice when you can’t hide bitchy undertones. There are no secrets. Whatever you say will slip out. Talk about celebrities instead of gossiping.

PISCES  Feb 19-Mar 19
Your intuition and advice are worth more than you realize. If you listened to yourself, you’d be better off! Blurting out a secret proves to your advantage if it’s your secret and nobody else’s.

ARIES  Mar 20-Apr 19
Sudden outbursts reveal hidden depths and secret strengths. Open up to your insightful friends. Working too hard can upset the apple cart. Pace yourself to be effective with your colleagues.

TAURUS  Apr 20-May 20
Sassy, daring boldness is atypical for Taureans, but work whatever energy you have to get ahead. You reveal more of yourself than you had intended, but that should work in your favor, too.

GEMINI  May 21-Jun 20
Any simmering domestic problems are sure to boil over. To head off resentments, open up to your partner first about personal fears and anxieties and see how that feeds the other issues.

CANCER  Jun 21-Jul 22
Holidays put stress on relationships. This decade is especially tough for that, and the next few years will be worse. Talk about your shared commitment and learn from rough spots.

LEO  Jul 23-Aug 22
Being nice with people can be a challenge, but honing your teamwork skills makes it worthwhile. The real trick is to balance that with creative impulses that require your individual initiative.

VIRGO  Aug 23-Sep 22
Working at enjoyment misses the point. Working toward an accomplishment can slide into obsession. If something is supposed to be fun isn’t any more, step back and think about it.

LIBRA  Sep 23-Oct 22
When the going gets tough, the tough get creative. A spat shows serious problems unsuspected, but the solution is within reach. It’s not easy, but small sacrifices on both sides fix it.

SCORPIO  Oct 23-Nov 21
Your revolutionary ideas are on the right track, but discuss them with an expert who shares your ideals. If your partner feels neglected swallow your pride, apologize, and deal with it.

SAGITTARIUS  Nov 22-Dec 20
What would your perfect job look like? You will have the opportunity to improve your work situation. For now, nurture the ideal.

Jack Fertig can be reached at 415-864-8302 or Starjack.com

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 23, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Christmas presence

Satiric ‘Drowsy Chaperone’ succeeds with intimate setting; DTC freshens up its annual ‘Christmas Carol;’ and who’s being a Scrooge about ‘Santaland Diaries?’ We are

ON THE BOARDS
A CHRISTMAS CAROL
at the Kalita Humphreys Theater,
3636 Turtle Creek Blvd. Through Dec. 24.
DallasTheaterCenter.org.

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE
at Theatre Three, 2900 Routh St. in the Quadrangle. Through Jan. 9.
Theatre3Dallas.com

THE SANTALAND DIARIES
at Greenville Center for the Arts,
5601 Sears St. Through Dec. 23.
ContemporaryTheatreofDallas.com

stage-2
MUSICAL OF MUSICALS | TV talk show host Rob McCollum, left, makes a hilarious narrator in Theatre Three’s intimate, well-paced production of ‘The Drowsy Chaperone.’

Chaperone: Rousing drowsy

There are some shows that seem nearly impossible to translate to the challenges of theater-in-the-round, but Theatre Three’s extravagantly staged production of The Drowsy Chaperone not only succeeds, but perhaps becomes better.  Now, much like the show’s narrator, the audience becomes surrounded and engulfed by the action.

The show’s conceit is that a brittle theater geek (Good Morning Texas’ hilarious Rob McCollum) is alone in his apartment, waxing nostalgic about his favorite musical of all time, The Drowsy Chaperone. He pulls out an LP (“yes records” he snaps), puts it on the turntable and as the cast recording plays, the musical comes to life in his living room.

Part loving homage, part brilliant satire, the musical that unfolds is a classically constructed Broadway hit about a woman leaving her glamorous career in showbiz to marry a man she met on a cruise ship. Is it true love or is she just interested in his father’s oil holdings? To keep the bride-to-be from seeing the groom prior to the wedding, she is assigned a chaperone, who’s constantly drunk (“drowsy,” as she calls it) despite it being the height of Prohibition. As the wedding day approaches, plenty of obstacles are thrown in the path of the happy couple, building to a rousing climax.

There are plenty of colorful characters, including an aviatrix (which we’re told is code for “lesbian”), a womanizing Latin lover, rat-a-tat gangsters, ditzy socialites and an even ditzier chorus girl. All the machinations and musical theater clichés are present and accounted for, from tap-dancing showdowns to jazz hands and high-kicking chorus lines, all combined with self-referential jokes that frequently break down the fourth wall.

Theatre Three’s casting and production is spot-on, including McCollum, the always enchanting Arianna Movassagh as the moll Kitty and a tipsy turn from Marisa Diotalevi as the title character. The Drowsy Chaperone, in all its laugh-out-loud extravagance, is a wonderful alternative to the holiday fare on other stages around town, and every bit as merry and bright.

— Steven Lindsey

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BAH, CRUMPET | Nye Cooper returns to the island of misfit toy-sellers in the bitter comedy ‘The Santaland Diaries.’

Santaland: Angels we have heard on Nye

By the sounds of it, I may be one of the few left in these parts that had not seen The Santaland Diaries, the stage adaptation of David Sedaris’ droll essay about debasing himself for part-time work at Macy’s. Over the years, the local production has become a holiday tradition with Nye Cooper donning the elf cap. He channels Sedaris with the appropriate wit, but as a first timer at the one-man show at the Contemporary Theatre of Dallas, it seems that the show, while fun, needs some oomph.

The play recounts Sedaris’ travails working as Crumpet, an elf in New York’s famous Santaland display over one Christmas season. Bratty children and even brattier parents are all stars in Sedaris’ story and Cooper succeeds in stepping into that skin. He should: He’d done it more than half a dozen times. With such familiarity, he embodies disgruntlement to the nines, but also a certain amount of heart to take the audience from disdainful diatribes to a tender epiphany.

Despite the show’s institutional standing, it plays just shy of greatness. Cooper can deliver a punchline, but you can also tell it’s been delivered before… and before that. Diaries is ideal for the driest of humor, but he held back a bit here and delivered Crumpet as just kind of a friendly sass.

Nonetheless, Sedaris’ clever writing mixed with Cooper’s rubber face and sad eyes is a match made in heaven. And the payoff isn’t the sweet realization he comes to. It’s Crumpet saying all those things to holiday shoppers you wish you could say yourself. Hearing those alone makes it a worthwhile see.

— Rich Lopez

HUM BUGGERY | The Ghost of Christmas Past (Cedric Neal) visits old Ebenezer (Chamblee Ferguson) in DTC’s slightly retooled version of ‘A Christmas Carol.” (Photo courtesy Linda Blase)

A Christmas Carol: A turn of the Scrooge

After five years of listening to other actors humbug their way into audiences’ hearts as Scrooge, the Dallas Theater Center has moved its perennial Bob Cratchit, Chamblee Ferguson, into the lead role in their annual A Christmas Carol, and the move ends up being one long overdue.

Ferguson is tall and slender, and in his tight-fitting black suit, Ichabod-like. That’s a very different tale from the same era (and across an ocean), but it draws together an odd thematic unity to the idea of the ghost story: Real or imagined, sometimes you need to look at the world anew.

Which is pretty much what this production’s new director, Mathew Gray, has done within the limitations of the same script and set that has been trotted out ever since they tore down the Art District Theater to build the Winspear and the Wyly. The show is solid, and it has succeeded (more or less) over the past few years with some tweaking here and there, but this may be the biggest overhaul yet: New Marley (Liz Mikel, looking like the scary spirit of Harriet Tubman), new Christmas Past (Cedric Neal, his skin seeming almost iridescent), new Christmas Present (J. Brent Alford in an unfortunate hippie-dippie robe that makes him look like Jesus and his amazing Technicolor dreamcoat, chillin’ on a commune circa 1968), and the most adorable kids — Little Ebenezer/Tiny Tim (on press night, played by a girl, Marlhy Murphy) and Edward Cratchit (Aidan Langford) — in memory.

But it’s Ferguson and Regan Adair (stepping in as Cratchit) whose performances really transforms the show. There’s great chemistry here: Ferguson, a lanky and sharp Mutt opposite Adair’s sad-sack, flustered Jeff. There’s more of a comic sensibility between them, with Adair spinning a modern twist on the familiar victim of Scrooge’s discourtesy. The Cratchits’ dinner scene is as tender as it’s ever been.

If the comedy is played up well, so is the schmaltz (it’s easy to tear up by the end), but Gray also imbues the ghost visits with a Twilight Zone quality. There really is a sense for the bizarre and the supernatural now.

And also a sense for the message. During a rough economy, Dickens’ social engineering — looking after the poor, the greed of the privileged, etc. — take on heightened meaning. It redirects the emphasis of A Christmas Carol from personal growth to a call for systemic compassion for those in need. It’s good to be reminded of that in an effective way that also entertains.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Note: As it has for the past two years, the Dallas Theater Center will be raising money for the North Texas Food Bank to help feed the underprivileged living in North Texas. Donations can be made at every performance.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 10, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

’Tis the season

Christmastime gears up stage traditions

PANTO-MOM | Ivan Jones, right, plays Governess Amplebottom in ‘Babes in the Wood,’ a fairy tale take on Robin Hood that’s suitable for kids but full of double entendres. (Photo by Mark Trew)

With Thanksgiving now behind us, theater companies are pullout out their Christmas fare — many with more-than-holiday appeal to the gay community. Check out these shows that might jingle your bells.

A Christmas Carol (Dallas Theater Center). The classic production returns to Oak Lawn, with a few tweaks. Back in the cast are local actors Chamblee Ferguson and Liz Mikel … only this time in new roles. Ferguson has matured from Cratchit to his boss, playing Scrooge, and Mikel returns, now in the role of the ghost of Jacob Marley. Kalita Humphreys Theater, 3636 Turtle Creek Blvd. Opens Dec. 3, runs daily (except Mondays) through Dec. 24. DallasTheaterCenter.org.

The Santaland Diaries (Contemporary Theatre of Dallas). Another tradition is back, as actor Nye Cooper and director Coy Covington add some holiday jeer with David Sedaris’ hilarious antidote to Christmas treacle, about a gay elf toiling away at Macy’s during the holiday. Ho-ho-homo! Greenville Center for the Arts, 5601 Sears St. Opens Dec. 3; runs weekends through Dec. 23. ContemporaryTheatreofDallas.com.

Babes in the Wood (Theatre Britain). Dallas’ resident Anglophile troupe has a new venue and a new show, its annual world premiere panto. A tradition in England for 200 years, this fairy tale always features a cross-dressing comic dame (played this year by Ivan Jones) who tells lots of lascivious jokes that go over the kids’ heads but keep the adults laughing. Cox Building Playhouse, 1517 Avenue H, Plano. Opens Dec. 3, runs weekends through Dec. 23. Theatre-Britain.com.

The Drowsy Chaperone (Theatre Three). It’s not a Christmas show, but this buoyant musical — about a forgotten but goofily charming Depression Era musical that comes to life in a gay man’s apartment — is loaded with good cheer and a smartness about the conventions of the form. Theatre Three, 2900 Routh St. in the Quadrangle. Currently in previews; opens Dec. 6, runs through Jan. 8 (no performances Christmas week). Theatre3Dallas.com.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 3, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens