Back to school: Tax-free weekend is upon us

taxholidayhres1_11571106Every year, the state of Texas does at least one thing right: it gives Texas shoppers a break from local and state sales taxes in preparation for the upcoming school year. Granted this means malls are packed, your two-year-old gives new meaning the “terrible twos” and single, childless folks like me quiver at thought of even stepping out into the world. But hey, were I not that guy I sure would take advantage of it.

So here’s the skinny:

According to State Comptroller Susan Combs’ webpage, there are two categories of items exempt from sales and use taxes: most school supplies and then other items like clothing. For the ladder category, think, “Could my kid wear this to school?” If in doubt, check out the list provided by Combs’ office here. If an Internet business is engaged in business in Texas, purchases meeting the state’s standards apply.

For every $100 purchase, shoppers save between $8-$10. Keep in mind that there’s some fine print you can’t ignore though. Items need to be below $100, but there is no limit on overall purchases. Read the fine print here.

Happy shopping, y’all.

—  James Russell

Part(y)ing shot

A little needle work can turn a dull soiree into a face-saving event

 

Dermatologist John Proffitt, above, has begun offering Xeomin treatments in a more festive fashion. Injections are less stressful in a comfortable, fun atmosphere — and he even brings munchies.

Dermatologist John Proffitt, above, has begun offering Xeomin treatments in a more festive fashion. Injections are less stressful in a comfortable, fun atmosphere — and he even brings munchies.

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer

How’s this for a Saturday evening: You head to a friend’s soiree, pick through the nibblies, grab a cocktail and then have someone stab a needle into your face.

That may not sound like your typical fun weekend get-together, but if there can be parties that peddle jewelry or give away swag bags, why not one that leaves you looking a little refreshed — even if it is with a shot?

Dr. John Proffitt and his team at Oak Lawn Dermatology have begun offering this new service, mixing a little bit of pain with a lot of pleasure.

As a glorified house call, it’s a chance to both do shots and get shots. Proffitt will come to your home with units of Xeomin (similar to Botox) and gladly inject those interested with a little touch-up around the eyes. He’s found the domestic setting, while fun like any party, also has therapeutic advantages.

“The atmosphere is very relaxed and people can get to know me better,” Proffitt says. “They can get comfortable if they are hesitant, and can see their friends do it. The procedure is simple and my syringes are tiny. Usually people have had it done before at these parties.”

The idea for in-home transformations came to Proffitt when a patient was impressed with his results and thought his friends would be interested in getting the procedure. Instead of convincing them one at a time to make appointments, his client had a party with Xeomin on the menu.

“It was like any typical party. I brought food,” Proffitt says. “Usually I’ll give a talk before to explain everything and people get interested and watch others before them.”

So you want to have your own party? There’s nothing to it other than giving his office a call. Well that and shopping for liquor and hors d’oeuvres.

“All anyone has to do is just call our office. We’ll talk about it and make the arrangements,” he says. “We talk about prices for the injection units and even a reduction for groups.”

His parties are also smart P.R. He’s won new clients from home parties and the firm hosts get-togethers at the office. For a firm that has only been present in the community for just over eight months, Proffitt knows how to make an impression — even if it is putting a needle in your face.

For more information, call 214-526-8100 or visit OakLawnDermatology.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition February 17, 2012.

—  Michael Stephens

D.I.V.E. drive to benefit Genesis Women’s Shelter

Genesis Women’s Shelter on Lemmon Avenue has long been a staple to the LGBT community for some nifty shopping and easy drop-off of items that can be resold to help provide and maintain a safe haven for women who are victims of domestic abuse. A couple of colleagues  always tell me about the finds they get for cheap. Well, a coalition of businesses have come together to create Dallas Independent Venue Exchange, or D.I.V.E., to begin a coat drive as winter nears and temperatures start to drop. D.I.V.E. selected Genesis and the Austin Street Centre homeless shelter as recipients of the drive with which they hope you’ll drop off some of that outerwear that you don’t wear so much anymore.

Queer-friendly spots such as the Granada Theater, Good Records and The Kessler are among the drop-off sites for the drive that runs until Nov. 23. You can see the other locations in the poster above. Click here for more information or email this guy if you want to do just a little more.

—  Rich Lopez

Do you Peru?

Even as fans rallied to help Coco Peru get her next film off the ground, the drag goddess still likes her comedy live

lead

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer
lopez@dallasvoice.com

Expect a lovefest when Coco Peru comes back to Dallas for Pride weekend. With memories of a responsive audience, shopping and beef jerky during her last go-round here nearly two years ago, the drag goddess is hoping for a repeat performance. Sort of. She’s back on the road with a new show, but that’s not all the legendary queen has going on.

“Well, we’ve filmed Girls Will Be Girls 2 already,” Peru (aka Clinton Leupp) says. “Right now the writer/director is busily editing. It’s just one of those things: You film it and hope for the best.”

Peru has garnered a significant amount of film work over the years, usually with notable cameos in films like as Trick, but occasionally as the star, as with Girls Will Be Girls. But she admits live performance is where she’s at her best.

“I like to think my show is like watching a theater piece,” she says. “I love film acting, but it’s exciting on a whole other level. There’s not that energy of a live audience and no feedback. So often, comic timing is how the audience is reacting to you. With acting, you mentally feel it out, try it and mostly trust the director. I find sometimes I rehearsed a line so much in my head, it takes me a few times to take direction on it.”

For Girls 2, Peru discovered just how much her fans appreciated her work. As a micro-mini indie, the film went on the website Kickstarter to raise funds. As word got out that the film was in production and that Peru was in it, the money rolled in.

“The movie was completely funded by fans,” she exclaims. “It was just incredible that they would want to pay money! And I must say, most of it came from my fans. I’m just putting that out there.”

Along with funds from Kickstarter, the crew itself was almost all-volunteer. People would just show up, willing to help out. It turned into an actual labor of love.

Along with donated help, the production even received a donated green screen. All the generosity reminded Peru that people are that genuinely kind and that it’s all right to ask for things, which usually embarrasses her. She saw this particular filmmaking experience as a good lesson on many levels.

“Let’s just hope the movie’s funny,” she laughs.

Dating back to the “early ‘90s” — that’s as specific as her website will get — Peru gives much credit to her fans along the way for the success of her career. Even if they come up to once again mention her role in the film Trick, Peru takes none of it for granted. Perhaps it’s cliché for any type of celebrity to appreciate their fans, but she  talks at length about how her fans have kept her driven.

“It’s so overwhelming, whether it’s a movie or my own shows, that they will take time to contact me to tell me whatever it is they are feeling,” she says. “I feel lucky and blessed when they reach out to me and I strive to answer every email. I remember those days that felt so lonely and sad. Growing up gay and feeling rejected doesn’t make a happy life. But when you get over 800 birthday messages on Facebook, it’s amazing!”

She’ll meet a new slew of fans on her current End of Summer Tour, as she’ll visit Tampa and Las Vegas for the first time as a performer. Even with her experience onstage, Peru is still daunted by a new audience, the same way she was before playing Dallas the first time early last year.

“The first time, I was nervous and I didn’t know what to expect,” she recalls. “I felt that audiences came wanting to have a great time. You go to certain cities and they have a bit of an edge, but in Texas, it was an immediate love fest on both ends.”

In her new show, There Comes a Time, Peru talks about getting older and reminiscing about her life. Fortunately, Dallas isn’t a punch line in her monologue. The city left a good impression on her and she only hopes to make another one of her own.

“Well, I’m happy to be coming back and they took such good care of me last time,” she says, “but I don’t wanna jinx myself. You never know.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 2, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Drawing Dallas • Rick Phillips

With the holiday upon us, floral designing is a labor of love for Dallas’ Rick Phillips

MARK STOKES  | Illustrator
mark@markdrawsfunny.com

Name: Rick Phillips

Occupation: Floral designer

Spotted at: Dog park on Swiss Avenue

Tanned, fit Aquarian Rick Phillips was born in Dallas but raised in neighboring Grand Prairie. He sprouts from a small but creative family: His mother sings opera, his brother is a drummer in a rock band, and his grandmother was also a gifted artist.

Labor of Love: Rick has been creating beautiful floral arrangements for more than 17 years. His first job interview in the business was to create a funeral arrangement. “I almost cut my thumb off,” says Rick, “I think they felt sorry for me. I got the job!”

Studying photography in college led to a natural progression into painting and finally into floral design. The instant gratification he gets from the process satisfies his art muse. Rick says he makes up his arrangements as he goes along. “I have a concept about color and shape when I start, but after that I free-wheel it.” He has been the exclusive florist for a high-profile jewelry store for eight years.

When he’s not handcrafting floral masterpieces, Rick enjoys cooking and shopping vintage and junk shops for awesome shirts and cool coats (and he can’t wait to for the weather to get cooler so he can wear them!) He loves all kinds of music from classical to techno/dance.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 2, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Cazwell headlines a full day of Razzle Dazzle today

Bedazzled

Once you recover from last night’s MetroBall, then you have a full day of Razzle Dazzle with today’s street festival. The day starts with the Sidewalk Sale and Fair where merchants once again offer discounts on your shopping excursions. The cool part will be the vintage auto show.About 50 autos from Classic Chassis Car Club will be parked along Cedar Springs Road until 4 p.m.

The night picks up when the Street Festival gets underway featuring live performances by Cheer Dallas, The Bright, Uptown Players, Chaz Marie, the Gary Floyd Trio and more. DJs Mickey Briggs and Tim Pfleuger provide dance music all night. All that will be highlighted by the return of Cazwell on the mainstage. And there is still all the goings-on in the bars and Midway of carnival games, a mechanical bull and an obstacle course. This could be like gay Wipeout.

DEETS: Cedar Springs Road and Throckmorton Streets. Sidewalk sale 10 a.m.–4 p.m., Street Festival 7 p.m.–1 a.m. Free. RazzleDazzleDallas.com.

—  Rich Lopez

Christmas Shopping At Wal-Mart Means Browsing ‘Faggoty Vampire Books’ With Your Daughter

Shawn, the mostly anonymous father behind the website GodGunsGutsGlory.com (which has a whole section devoted to "expos[ing] the LIES of the Filthy Homosexual Agenda), went Christmas shopping with his daughter at Wal-Mart. They visited the books section. And while we already knew the store stocked anti-gay parenting guides, little did we know it also has a whole shelf devoted to gay vampires. Somebody call the quality assurance department.


Permalink | 4 comments | Add to del.icio.us


Tagged: , , ,

Queerty

—  admin

What Other Companies Can Learn From The Aftermath Of Caitlin Breedlove’s Shopping Center Ouster

Here's what I love most about (what happened after) Caitlin Breedlove got kicked out of a North Carolina shopping center for holding hands with and kissing her girlfriend: York Properties, the management company of Raleigh's Cameron Village, not only publicly apologized but met with Breedlove and asked what they could do to make the situation right. "York Properties gave us everything we wanted," she tells Joy Behar, adding "it's important to tell that part of the story." She's right.

CONTINUED »


Permalink | Post a comment | Add to del.icio.us


Tagged: , , , , , , ,

Queerty

—  John Wright

NC: Lesbian couple say they were forced to leave Raleigh shopping center for kissing in public

I’ve never heard of this happening in Durham. Perhaps there are some overzealous homophobic mall cops earning their keep over there at Cameron Village. (Q-Notes):

A Triangle-area social justice group is planning to demonstrate at the Cameron Village shopping center this weekend after its co-director and partner were booted from the premises after showing signs of “gentle affection.”

SONG leader Caitlin Breedlove says she and her partner had just finished eating at The Flying Biscuit on Thursday afternoon when they went to sit outside. There, they shared a brief kiss after which a security guard approached them and said they had to leave.

According to a release, the security guard said that “being affectionate” was “inappropriate.” The couple asked the guard if he would have said the same thing if they had been an opposite sex couple. The guard said, “No.” The couple asked to see the security guard’s supervisor, who also said they needed to leave, reminded them Cameron Village was private property and said, “You want this to be public, you want people to see what you are.”

Cameron Village, owned by York Properties, needs to speak up about its practices that this guard is enforcing, or they are going to be in a heap of PR trouble…trust me.

Do the vendors and shops of Cameron Village want to see their sales drop as the pink dollars walk away?

BTW, The Flying Biscuit Cafe, where the couple had eaten earlier, support Breedlove and Ammons. Breedlove:

“Bullying is just another word for violence, and it is not just one or two bad apples that say this is OK but mainstream culture in general. Regardless of whether Cameron Village is private property or not, no one deserves to be bullied in public, and if we don’t stand up and say that all discrimination is wrong we contribute to a society where only some people get to feel safe in living their daily lives.”

Southerners on New Ground (SONG) will hold their demonstration at 1 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 17 at Cameron Village. For more information, visit southernersonnewground.org.

York Properties

Cameron Village

Office Phone – 919-821-1350

Fax – 919-828-9240

lynneworth@yorkproperties.com

Related:

* No kissing at Cameron Village (Indy Weekly)
Pam’s House Blend – Front Page

—  John Wright

Drawing Dallas

Eccentric classical music lover John Cobb never leaves home without his trusty radio

MARK STOKES  | Illustrator mark@markdrawsfunny.com

John Cobb

Easy listener

Name: John Cobb

Occupation: Telemarketer

Spotted at: Half Price Books on Northwest Highway

Have radio, will travel: While shopping, Cobb was listening to WRR on  his portable radio. Originally from New York City, John sings classical music (loves Verdi operas) and is also a landscape photographer. He’s a voracious reader of biographies and history books.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 3, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas