“So You Think You Can Dance” holds auditions

If you want to get on a Fox reality show and couldn’t carry a tune if it came with a handle, you might wanna show up at McFarlin Auditorium on the SMU campus Friday. That’s where they’ll be holding auditions for the ninth season of So You Think You Can Dance. Registration begins at 8 a.m., and you must be prepared to be available for up to two days, in the event of call-backs.

To see all eligibility rules, visit Fox.com/Dance.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Gays join protest of Bush library groundbreaking

Rick Vanderslice

About 100 people gathered to protest the groundbreaking of the George Bush Library on the Southern Methodist University campus this morning.

Members of the LGBT community were among the organizers. Other protesters came to Dallas from around the country.

Among the protesters was Cindy Sheehan, who became the face of the anti-war movement after the death of her son Casey in Iraq in 2004.

A march began at about 9:30 a.m. at Mockingbird Station and ended on the SMU campus outside Ford Stadium near Mockingbird Lane and Airline Drive. Many were dressed in black with white masks representing soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan during the Bush administration.

Five different police forces kept protesters and counter-protesters apart. The march began in Dallas, crossed into Highland Park and ended on campus in University Park. SMU campus police also were on hand.

The groundbreaking was held several blocks away and protesters were not allowed anywhere near the dignitaries, who included  the Bushes and Cheneys. Sheriff’s department officers guarded that ceremony in riot gear with shields and batons. Only pre-approved guests and media were allowed near the library site.

However, pro-Bush counter-protesters were allowed to mingle on the outskirts of the anti-Bush crowd.

Local speakers were mostly from the LGBT community.

Aaron Rathbun dressed in a graduation cap and gown and held a sign on stage that read, “Bush failed us.”

Radio host and Queer LiberAction activist Rick Vanderslice led some of the chanting and was one of the speakers. He echoed the event’s “Arrest Bush” theme.

Vanderslice said the policy institute is being built to justify the policies of the Bush administration. He said this can’t be allowed to happen and called them war criminals who should be arrested and brought to justice.

“We can get them,” he said.

“Millions of lives have been ruined because of irresponsible foreign policy,” said Charles Grand, a speaker from the Socialist Workers Party.

Grand said he was happy with the number of people attending since the protest took place during a workday.

Sheehan explained why she had traveled to Dallas from her home in California for the event.

“You can’t put a bloom on that lily,” she said. “He wasn’t a good person. He wasn’t a good president. We can’t let him rewrite history.”

Other speakers included Time magazine 2002 person of the year Colleen Rowley, Code Pink founder Medea Benjamin and Col. Ann Wright, who spent 29 years in the military followed by 16 years as a diplomat and resigned her post to protest Bush administration policy.

State Rep. Lon Burnham from Tarrant County was scheduled to speak but was held up by an airline delay.

The museum and library will open in 2013. The policy center is already operating in offices in Preston Center.

Dressed as death, a number of protesters, including Time person of the year Colleen Rowley, marched to the groundbreaking but were turned back

—  David Taffet

Word association with Melissa Etheridge before her show tonight at McFarlin Auditorium

On the newsstands now, you’ll find Melissa Etheridge gracing DV’s front page. This was to get you in the mood for her show tonight at McFarlin Auditorium at SMU. She spoke about her newest album Fearless Love and her current tour with contributing writer Gregg Shapiro for the majority of our published interview, but she also gave me 10 minutes to chat about other stuff last week. We talked about the tour and how the media has handled her with her personal life being aired for all to see. But she was also game for some word association and I was able to get her thoughts on a random list of topics. With two minutes left to go, I was surprised and definitely grateful, how much she gave me in such short time. Read our session below.

Again, Etheridge performs tonight at McFarlin Auditorium, 6405 Boaz Lane, on the SMU campus at 8 p.m. $55–$100. Ticketmaster.com. The clip above is from her show on July 22 performing “Indiana” from Fearless Love. Consider it a preview of her show tonight.

Here are Etheridge’s word-association responses:

Twitter — “I find the whole Internet fascinating. It’s both good and bad. I think it’s great that we as a people are finding ways to communicate with each other and connect with each other without having to do it on our own. The Internet is a conduit. Now, I don’t want to sit around and find out if people have eaten their toast. I think it’s a cool way to reach out for young folks. But I don’t do it.”

Lady Gaga — “She’s a very talented gal. My impression is that she’s very smart really understands the music business. She’s been able to create this image and make a splash. I wish her the best of luck in this weird pop culture world out there.”

The comeback of vinyl — “I’ve been listening to some lately. If you’re real deep music listener, there is a sound you don’t get from digital. We’re researching this album to see if we should release it on vinyl.”

Mel Gibson — “I don’t judge people and I don’t like to gossip. I believe everyone has a journey and path and I believe what you put out comes back to you. I think we’re witnessing that right now with him.”

Dallas — “I love Dallas! I have such a connection with there. I find Texas to be very gay. Yummy gay! There is a a strong out community there. I really enjoy it there.”

—  Rich Lopez

Letting the music speak

Despite a very public and nasty break up, Oscar-winning rocker Melissa Etheridge finds solace and confidence in her career

GREGG SHAPIRO  | Contributing Writer greggshapiro@aol.com
RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

Melissa Etheridge
GUITAR HERO | Right now, Etheridge focuses on her music and new album, staying mum about her personal life.

MELISSA ETHERIDGE
McFarlin Auditorium, 6405 Boaz Lane on the SMU
campus. Aug. 3 at 8 p.m. $55–$100. Ticketmaster.com.

Longtime Melissa Etheridge fans who miss the harder sound of her early years will find much to like on her new album, Fearless Love. Etheridge hasn’t rocked with this much   passion in years and it’s clear that she hasn’t forgotten how to do it.

Such rock-n-roll fury could be a way for her to be working out some personal issues, including the recent public ending of her relationship with longtime partner Tammy Lynn Michaels. Whatever it is, Etheridge is back in ass-kicking mode.

……………………………

Dallas Voice: Your new disc, Fearless Love, is co-produced by John Shanks who also produced your Breakdown album. What do you like about working with John? Etheridge: We played in my first band and we played together on the road for years and years and years before he became mister mega-producer. I know him like a brother. He can tell me anything and I can tell him anything. He knows, musically, what I’m about. I think he’s incredibly talented. It’s a perfect fit.

Is it hard to believe that it’s been more than 20 years since your self-titled major-label disc was released? Yeah! The passage of time has been kind of freaky. And feeling like I do in the entertainment industry now, looking back [I’m] going “Wow, it’s been over 20 years!” There’s a certain amount of, “Oh, I think I can relax. I’m still selling tickets. People are coming to see me.” It’s a good feeling and it’s also a “time flies” feeling.

You do some serious rocking out on songs such as “Miss California,” “Nervous,” “The Wanting of You,” “Drag Me Away,” “Indiana” and the title track. How did it feel to rock like that again? Oh, it feels so good, and it’s really reflected in the live show. I plug those songs in and then I do all the other songs around them. It’s like, “Whoa!” That’s a couple of hours of rock and roll right there. It feels really good; I like it.

You’ve been on tour in support of Fearless Love for a few months — are the new songs being received by your fans the way you want them to be? Even more so. I have to tell you, when I start “Indiana,” [it gets] a huge response. It’s really nice. And everybody’s singing along. That means so much, especially for the new material to reach people like that. That’s what you want.

“Miss California,” like “Tuesday Morning” from Lucky, “Scarecrow” from Breakdown and your Oscar-winning tune “I Need To Wake Up,” is an example of your political voice in your work. What does it mean to you to be able to combine your music with causes and issues about which you feel strongly? That’s been quite a journey for me. That started on my second record [Brave And Crazy] with the song “Testify,” which was an awakening of that part of me. Realizing that I have a voice and that I’ve been gifted with the ability to maybe make people think or do something socially through my music. I’m always very conscious when I do it. I never want to preach from my personal perspective.

Rock musicals have been dominating Broadway stages in recent years. Is there any chance that there is a Melissa Etheridge Broadway musical in the pipeline? I have been thinking about doing a Broadway show even before the rock musicals were in. When I saw that U2 was doing something and Green Day, I was like, “Aw, come on! I’m putting mine together!” But, no, it’s good. I’m glad that they’re doing it and they’ve been successful. Yes, I am actually in the process now. It’s very near to being written.

Did you do theater in high school, too? I did! Love theater. Of course, I’m gay! Theater!

Lilith Fair is going on and Lollapalooza is right around the bend. Have you considered organizing a music festival either of LGBT musicians or one in support of a cause that is near to you? Those thoughts pass by me. I tried to get something together Dinah Shore Weekend [but] it’s hard: It’s hard to find people who want to do it with you. It’s just hard, especially with the economy right now. I’m doing well and I’m very grateful. When people are feeling a little better, it’s might be something I’d be in to, but not right now.

You helped pave the way for artists such as Chely Wright (a fellow Kansan), Ricky Martin and Christian singer Jennifer Knapp to come out publicly this year. How do you feel about that? I love it, because coming out publicly when you are a public figure is such a personal choice. It’s a big thing and it’s [a] huge responsibility. To help and inspire and be a part of anybody’s experience in that, I’m honored. Because I know it’s the best thing to do for yourself because you can never feel your success all the way in to your bones if you don’t. You feel like you’re living a lie and it’s unhealthy.

Your break up with Michaels has been publicized across magazines and blogs. Do you think that the media has been fair in its coverage of you? There is no way that the press can be fair because they can never know everything. You basically are listening to one person and that’s the one person’s perspective. Because of that, I’ve chosen not to go into too much detail.

With all that’s been going on personally, how has the tour been for you? Is it a difficult endeavor or is it possibly therapeutic?  It’s a bunch of different things. For me, it is this great safe place. People come to a show and look for a good time and that gives me a wonderful feeling. And it is cathartic and therapeutic. Music has always been that for me. This  is what I have to do.  I do miss my kids when I don’t see them but I get back enough.

Would the album have been any different had it come out last week as opposed to before everything came out in the open? I wrote this album last year and so I can’t say it would have. Of course, it would have sounded different if I was writing after everything happened, but I wouldn’t have changed anything here and I wouldn’t have rescheduled its release because of it all. Music is the one thing I feel really confident in. It feeds me and it’s my work. Music I can do — everything else, maybe not so much.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition July 30, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas