Video: Eh, after a day of crowded malls, a lake of fire sounds like a respite




Good As You

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HRC President Joe Solmonese Sounds Off on DADT Vote

After Republican senators stalled the repeal of DADT yesterday by blocking lawmakers from moving forward with the National Defense Authorization Act, HRC President Joe Solmonese sounded off on the failure of some senators to honor our brave men and women in uniform, and what HRC and our allies will do to ensure that our nation’s service members are treated with dignity and respect.

In an opinion piece in The Hill newspaper, Joe laid out our community’s disappointment in yesterday’s vote, and outlined HRC’s direction for moving forward.

“I can’t help but think of the 14,000 veterans discharged under ‘Don’t Ask Don’t Tell’ since 1993 and the nearly 70,000 gay, lesbian, and bisexual service members who continue to selflessly serve in silence,” he wrote. “They have been waiting for the Senate – for their country – to come through for them, to allow them to finally serve openly, honestly, and with the full integrity their uniform demands.”

Several paths lay ahead as we move forward from yesterday’s vote. Senator Reid has pledge to return to the bill when the Senate returns after the elections. Additionally, HRC has called upon the Attorney General not to appeal a recent District Court decision that declared “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” unconstitutional.

“While we continue to fight to get the Defense bill over the finish line, now it’s the Attorney General’s turn to stand on the right side of history. “ added Solmonese.

We urge you to sign our petition to let Attorney General Eric Holder know that we want to see an end to this law. While the Senate’s decision has disappointed us all, we must continue to do everything that we can to end this terrible law.


Human Rights Campaign | HRC Back Story

—  John Wright

1963 sounds a lot like 2010

From David Broder at the Washington Post:

No one was more nervous than the Kennedy administration, as the memoirs later published by veterans of the White House and the Justice Department make clear. What sometimes is forgotten in the glow of King’s uplifting words is that this was a protest rally — and protests do at times get out of hand.

The frustration was great because hopes for civil rights had been raised so high by John F. Kennedy’s campaign rhetoric and by his decision to name his brother Robert as attorney general. The top ranks of the Justice Department were filled with civil rights advocates, but on Capitol Hill, the traditional opponents were slow-walking every bill, with scarcely an audible objection from the White House.

What became apparent, as the masses moved slowly along the Reflecting Pool and gathered before the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, was that if this was a mob, it was the most benign mob in history.

Even before a word was spoken — let alone the eloquent words that have echoed down through history — it had become absolutely evident from the people themselves that achieving civil rights would be the way to heal, not damage, the country.

I went back to the Star wondering what it was we had been afraid of. And I’ve remembered this many times since, when people have tried to teach us to fear certain things, such as someone else’s marriage or place of worship.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

1963 sounds a lot like 2010

From David Broder at the Washington Post:

No one was more nervous than the Kennedy administration, as the memoirs later published by veterans of the White House and the Justice Department make clear. What sometimes is forgotten in the glow of King’s uplifting words is that this was a protest rally — and protests do at times get out of hand.

The frustration was great because hopes for civil rights had been raised so high by John F. Kennedy’s campaign rhetoric and by his decision to name his brother Robert as attorney general. The top ranks of the Justice Department were filled with civil rights advocates, but on Capitol Hill, the traditional opponents were slow-walking every bill, with scarcely an audible objection from the White House.

What became apparent, as the masses moved slowly along the Reflecting Pool and gathered before the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, was that if this was a mob, it was the most benign mob in history.

Even before a word was spoken — let alone the eloquent words that have echoed down through history — it had become absolutely evident from the people themselves that achieving civil rights would be the way to heal, not damage, the country.

I went back to the Star wondering what it was we had been afraid of. And I’ve remembered this many times since, when people have tried to teach us to fear certain things, such as someone else’s marriage or place of worship.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  John Wright

Show vs. Show • 03.26.10

By RICH LOPEZ | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

Dallas doesn’t find itself too often in the middle of a gay live music dilemma. This weekend, two musicians might get to bring their sounds to the masses. That is, if LGBT Dallas heads out to support their own.

Tommy Hernandez was mostly on the local music scene as a solo artist but his latest venture takes him away from pop music into a trancey realm. As one half of Museum Creatures, he and Stephen Holmes go the electronica route.

Museum Creatures is part of the Mercy for Animals Benefit at the Cavern on Lower Greenville. They share a heavy bill with Soft Environmental Collapse, Division of Power and more for the Rockout for Animals show.

Patrick Boothe approaches music with a raw attitude. In his latest release, Jump In, a five song EP, he explores his darker side.

Boothe relocated from Dallas to Austin partly to be near the music industry there. A lonely spell set in and provided inspiration for his newest set of songs. But he’s confident his gay audience will relate.

“I do have a mostly gay audience and they don’t listen to just the poppy music at gay clubs and bars you always hear.”

He’s alt-rock with a piano but more in the vein of Tori Amos. Yet, maybe a bit louder.

“It’s just me and a piano but it’s gonna be loud. I sing pretty loud and I’m not a classically trained pianist so it can get intense at times.”

He’s alt-rock with a piano but more in the vein of Tori Amos. Yet, maybe a bit louder.

“It’s just me and a piano but it’s gonna be loud. I sing pretty loud and I’m not a classically trained pianist so it can get intense at times.


— Rich Lopez

 


This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition March 26, 2010.


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