WATCH: Wub, the gayest dance ever

WubThis video begins with a very attractive young man talking about police harassment. Why can’t he just dance in public, without being hassled by The Man? And then he demonstrates the controversial dance that got him and his cohorts arrested in the first place.

True arts movement or put-on? Do you really care? I don’t (though I expect the latter). It’s just a video of hot young men in Spandex playing with giant phalluses.

Best part? Mom watching in the background.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Tripping on a budget

Recently, my boyfriend and I wanted to embark on a fun, easy and cheap getaway. Since I live in Rhode Island, we were sold on the idea of a short drive out to Provincetown, Mass. right on the tip of Cape Cod. We gave ourselves a budget of just $150 for the 24-hour adventure — and even with gas at four bucks a gallon, we made it happen. Here’s how we did it … and how you might on your next trip:

Call motels and inns directly. While booking online is super convenient, it’s always helpful to talk to a real person. They will know of any last-minute cancellations or special discounts.

Travel off-peak. Our motel room was just $87 on a Thursday night. The same room on Friday before Memorial Day goes for $150. We saved $63 by leaving a day early.

Travel locally. While the world is full of wonderful destinations, many great spots are in our own backyards. You don’t have to travel far to have a great time. And staying closer to home will help keep costs under control. By driving the two hours to P’town, we saved a potential boatload of transportation expenses (airfare, taxi, etc.).

Eat like a local. P’town’s downtown core, like many tourist spots, is full of great but pricey restaurants. By taking a short drive off the beaten path, we were able to find a local hangout with more reasonable prices — dinner cost $28 for the both of us.

Use your feet. While P’town has some convenient paid parking lots, we were able to find a free parking spot a short walk from downtown (a $10 savings). Some destinations also offer great public transit options, making for an affordable and fun way to experience a town and meet new people.

Take advantage of the free stuff. Some of the best things Provincetown has to offer — landscapes, beaches and nature trails, people-watching and architecture (like the Pilgrims Monument, pictured) — are free. Hanging out in the sand and getting a little sun charges the soul and doesn’t break the bank.

Pack your own beverages. For less than $10, we filled my trunk with bottled water and soft drinks so we didn’t waste money on motel vending machines. Even better, bring along a reusable water bottle to stay hydrated and help save the environment. Cheers!

Hit up the grocery store. Since we were only staying for one night, stocking up on groceries didn’t make a lot of sense, but for longer trips, I love packing the mini fridge full of fresh food. It’s a lot cheaper than restaurant dining — and a lot healthier. Fruits, veggies and sandwiches bought at a local grocery store make for great food alternatives.

Take advantage of free food. Our motel offered a free continental breakfast. It wasn’t super fancy, but a quick croissant and coffee tided us over until the bigger meal of the day. Ask about any included meals when booking your room.

Talk to the locals. I try to befriend locals wherever I go. Natives can be a tremendous resource of recommendations and often know of free events (concerts, festivals, etc.). Be friendly and wear your smile.

— David “Davey Wavey” Jacques

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition June 17, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

‘Dying’ onstage

Rhett Henckel plays twin brothers — one straight, one gay — in ‘Dying City’

It’s not unusual for an actor to play multiple roles in a single play, but that’s a position usually reserved for minor characters. But for Rhett Henckel, the two men he plays in Dying City — twin brothers —are the main characters. One, seen in flashbacks, is a straight man who may have killed himself in Iraq; the other is a gay actor who visits the dead man’s widow a year after his death.

Second Thought Theatre closes out its 10th season with Christopher Shinn’s Pulitzer Prize-nominated play that touches on the Iraq War and the prickliness of family relations with a clipped, realistic style. Lee Trull makes his directorial debut.

We asked Henckel about playing two roles — and which one he identifies with more.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

…………………

DYING CITY
Studio Theatre, Addison Theatre Centre, 15650 Addison Road. Through July 2. $15–$20.
SecondThoughtTheatre.com

…………………

Dallas Voice: One of your characters, Peter, is described as an “intimidatingly handsome actor.” Typecasting? Henckel: I’ve been self-described as that, but I don’t hear it all the time. I have to act a little for it — I have to earn it this time.

Peter has a promising career, but he seems to have slept his way there. Same question. [Laughs] That’s maybe some advice I should take! If I want to have as promising a career as him, I should be more promiscuous. I’ve never really had that opportunity to do that — maybe I should have initiated it more. Though in rehearsals, I have flirted with [director] Lee Trull much more than I expected to. I’m constantly trying to gauge my fuckability in Lee’s eyes.

The play jumps quickly between years, and requires you to go between Peter, who’s gay, and his twin brother Craig, who’s straight. How do you subtly convey which character you are? I hope that I am doing it subtly. I think Christopher Shinn is very intentional on that — he wants the audience to be confused for a bit, even though they are two distinct characters. I’m not working off myself because I don’t see that character; it’s been through the eyes of Kelly [Craig’s widow] that I find the characters. Peter and Craig have very distinct opinions of Kelly, so that has opened up a lot.

But I think they are really alike. There’s a reason you are supposed to be confused. They have a lot of the same psychology and grew up in the same household. I have a therapist I talk to who I shared this play with, and when I said they had been described as polar opposites, he looked at me strangely. He thought they weren’t at all opposite, but really two extremes of one person. We’re all sort of that complex.

Which character do you relate to more? When I first started I identified as Peter — his passive-aggressive way of dealing with people; being an actor; his rampant egoism. But once we got into rehearsal, it was Craig I found quicker. There’s a quiet fury in this man that I feel like I ended up relating to. A lot more things are going on in Peter; Craig is a little bit simpler.

Peter is kind of complicated, for one, pretending to be antiwar to his gay friends even though he could not escape his conservative upbringing: Midwest values, guns, hawkishness about spreading freedom. Did you get that contradiction in him? I’m not even sure that’s entirely true — that’s what Craig says Peter told him. It’s hard to get to the core of what Peter really believes. Getting to the core is what’s so devastating. Being really honest about how we feel, confronting ourselves.

If I had to label the main theme of the play I would say it’s about how difficult true honesty can be: to others, to one’s self. What’s your take on it? No, that’s absolutely correct. Lies in this play are a very core theme. As any great play, it confronts this idea of what is the absolute truth. I hadn’t thought of it before, but Brick [in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof] is a very similar character to Craig. And even Peter. What is a lie and what is full disclosure and what is truly at the core of ourselves? It’s really fucking messy when we get right down to it.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition June 17, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Dynamic duo

Dallas’ fittest gay couples share their secrets for staying healthy and happy

ATHLETIC PAIR | World-class swimmer Dave Swenson, right, and his biking-running mate of 21 years James Maddox, left, will be headed to Hawaii next month for Swenson to compete in a major gay swimming meet. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

It’s been said that couples who bench-press together, stay together. OK, maybe that’s never been said, but it should have been — especially about gay couples. There’s something special about a relationship built on shared values, especially if those values include the inspiration and motivation to stay in shape. And, in an era when childhood obesity is alarmingly on the rise, recognizing those who stay fit as they age together seems like an especially responsible activity.

Which is why we kick off a new series in Dallas Voice dedicated to fit couples — those who bond over a decadent lunch of Bibb lettuce and Tic-Tacs instead of burgers and beer. You’re unlikely to see a muffin in their hands — or a muffin top around their Spandex.

We begin the series with a couple who have made exercise a part of their lives and their relationship for more than 20 years.

— Jef Tingley

………………………….

Names and ages: Dave Swenson, 48, and James Maddox, 43.

Occupations: Swenson: Manager for a Frisco software company;

Maddox: Customs broker

Years together: 21 in October.

Sports: Swenson: Swimming; Maddox: Running and biking.

Exercise regime: Swenson: I swim with the Dallas Aquatic Masters (DAM) three to four times a week. I also lift weights at the gym, but not nearly as often as I’d like. I used to run and do triathlons, but running injuries have pushed me more towards swimming.

Maddox: I lift weights five times per week, as well as run and row three times a week.

Do you play any sports or are you on any leagues: Swenson: I’m a registered U.S. Masters swimmer, and swim with the Dallas Aquatic Masters. I used to swim fairly regularly in masters swim meets, but I’m starting to enjoy open water swimming more than pool swimming. Last summer I swam in the Waikiki Roughwater swim in Hawaii, finishing second in my age group and 24th overall out of about 1,000 swimmers. In July, I’m swimming in the International Gay and Lesbian Aquatic Championships in Oahu, which includes another open water swim.

Most memorable athletic goal accomplished: Swenson: There have been a few, for different reasons. Qualifying for the 1984 Olympic Trials; being named to a U.S. National Swim Team; setting the SWC swimming record in the mile; breaking a world record in masters swimming; completing my first marathon; and watching James finish his first half-marathon.

Maddox: I have completed two half-marathons. It is a great feeling to cross that finish line after months of continual exercise and pushing yourself.

Upcoming fitness goals: Swenson: Just to remain active and healthy. If my legs hold out, I’d like to finish an Ironman distance triathlon one day.

Maddox: Lose 10 pounds for our July beach vacation.

Least favorite piece of gym equipment: Swenson: A treadmill — running in place is a slow form of torture.

Least favorite exercise: Maddox: Sit-ups!

Workouts preference: mornings or evenings? Maddox: I prefer to run in the evenings. However, as the temperature increases, I will run in the morning before work, when it is cooler. I primarily lift weights on my lunch hour and row in the evenings at the gym.

Favorite spot in North Texas to exercise outdoors: Maddox: White Rock Lake is beautiful. The Katy Trail has beautiful people. However, the Addison Trail, near my home, is nice and convenient, so I utilize it most often.

If you could become an Olympian in any sport, what would it be and why: Maddox: Gymnastics. The talent and skill of good gymnasts is so evident in their performance. The best ones make it look so easy. And, they have incredible physiques.

How do you reward yourself for a great workout: Maddox: Cheesecake and peanut butter!

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition June 17, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

LSR Journal: Because I learned what’s important

Eddie Munoz  Team Dallas Voice

Eddie Munoz
Eddie Munoz

This year marks the first year I’m officially involved with the Lone Star Ride.

I’ll be honest: Initially, I wanted a reason to be obliged to stay fit during the dog days of summer, not to mention getting to wear the shiny, sexy 88 percent polyester/12 percent spandex cycling gear. I mean seriously, who doesn’t look good in that?

Although my reason for participating began as a selfish ploy to achieve somewhat of an Adonis status, the reality of the event’s purpose has undoubtedly taken over — and I’m glad it has.

I first heard of Lone Star Ride while working for the Dallas Voice in Web development during my college days. As part of my duty, I would upload the weekly newspaper to the website, reading the stories as it pertained to our community’s struggle in the area, state, country and world. One of the things I remember was preparing for the Lone Star Ride articles and thought, “Oh here’s just another fundraiser.”

Back then I was a different person than I am today. As a younger person, I didn’t see the need to get involved, nor did I feel that I, as an individual, could make a difference.

It wasn’t until I graduated from college and met someone whose whole life pertained to getting involved in our community and I was inspired. He was making a difference, “saving the gays” as he sometimes would say. He definitely made a difference in me whether he knows it or not.

I’m happy to say that now I wake up next to him everyday.

In March, Robert Moore and I talked about the Lone Star Ride, and for some reason, I had a strong urge to know more about the ride and to get involved.

So a couple of months ago I picked up a bike from the Lone Star locker and began to train. Let me tell you though, it has not been easy to train for the 75 miles I hope to accomplish in September.

My very first training ride consisted of 23 miles and I said to myself, “Oh Lord! What did you get yourself into?” No amount of Gatorade could’ve quenched my thirst that day.

For someone who grew up with asthma and who, shamefully but admittedly, barely learned how to ride a bike five years ago, it has been a challenge. I’ve had a couple falls here and there, bruises, injuries, blood, sweat and tears. But with every fall I have, I commit myself to riding even more.

Cycling has become my therapy, a healthy escape from the weekly workload, the bars and the drama that it sometimes entails.

It’s also a game of mind versus body — “just one more mile … one more … one more,” I tell myself.

When I ride I focus on the people that the event benefits, and I can also focus on myself and my life. Whether I’m riding with my team, my partner or by myself, it is always an enjoyable experience for me.

I may not know the people that the event benefits, but I know that it will make a difference, that I will finally make a difference. I’ve learned to participate in life and help those in need, those who want another day in this world, who want to know they’re still appreciated and not forgotten.

AIDS may be incurable, but our apathy and inability to help has a cure. It only takes a minute, the click of a mouse, to donate online and change someone’s life.

So as I prepare to hit the pavement in September in my 88 percent polyester/12 percent spandex cycling shorts, I look forward to hearing from the organizations and the people that your contributions go towards.

And I hope to return next year and do it all over again with a bigger fundraising goal and more support.

To donate to Eddie Munoz or any other Lone Star Ride rider, go online to LoneStarRide.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 3, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens