Intercepted Bomb Was Addressed To Chicago Gay Synagogue

One of the bombs found in two cargo planes last week was addressed to a small synagogue in Chicago that caters to the LGBT community.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports:

Or c We are somewhat alarmed and somewhat disturbed," said Lilli Kornblum, co-president of Or Chadash, a North Side congregation of about 100 members. Or Chadash shares space with Emanuel Congregation at a synagogue on North Sheridan Road. Emanuel's rabbi said Saturday that he had been informed that more than two synagogues were targeted.

Rabbi Michael Zedek said he was told by a person of "considerable importance and reliability in the larger and Jewish community that there were four synagogues targeted, not two."

"He wanted to be assured that our security plan was in place," Zedek said of his source. "He told me, 'I've got good news and I've got bad news. The good news is Emanuel Congregation was not part of the four. The bad news is Or Chadash is.'"

Most peculiarly, the synagogue's website had recently been visited a number of times by someone from Egypt. Said Zede: "What I was told this morning by the person who keeps our website current is that when she was checking to see how many hits we'd been getting recently, and this is before what occurred on Friday, to her surprise we had 83 hits from an address in Cairo, Egypt. It does assume a greater interest in light of what happened.''

Meanwhile, US officials announced today that a woman in Yemen has been arrested in connection with the bombs.


Towleroad News #gay

—  admin

Yemen Bomb Was Headed For Gay Chicago Synagogue

One of the bombs sent from Yemen aboard passenger and cargo planes was destined for Chicago's Or Chadash, a gay synagogue that's an affiliate (and shares space with) the larger Emanuel Congregation. Despite the increased threat, Or Chadash' shabbat services went ahead as planned.


Permalink | Post a comment | Add to del.icio.us


Tagged: , , , ,

Queerty

—  admin

Congregation Or Chadash, LGBT synagogue in Chicago, was among targets of Yemeni terror plot

Congregation Or ChadashOr Chadash, Chicago’s predominantly LGBT synagogue, was among those targeted by the Yemeni bombing plot that was uncovered this weekend.

Bombs were wrapped in packages addressed to two Chicago synagogues but were discovered before they were placed on planes headed for the U.S. Explosive material was packed inside toner cartridges.

Or Chadash is one of seven predominantly LGBT synagogues in the U.S. that are members of the Union of Reform Judaism. Dallas’ Congregation Beth El Binah is one of the others. Whenever temples are targeted, LGBT synagogues are warned that they could be “two for the price of one” targets.

Locally, Beth El Binah officials contacted staff at the Gay and Lesbian Community Center where the synagogue meets. They told them they don’t receive unexpected packages at the Center and that if a package arrives for the temple, to call police immediately.

Congregation Beth El Binah President Diane Litke joked that Beth El Binah gets its printer supplies from Office Depot, not Yemen. But she said more seriously that she can’t imagine anyone who works at any synagogue opening an unexpected package from overseas, adding that all synagogues are aware of security concerns.

—  David Taffet

Hawaii boycott?

Gov. Linda Lingle

After Hawaii Gov. Linda Lingle vetoed a civil unions bill, the San Francisco Chronicle asked the question “Should civil union veto mean Hawaii boycott?”

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser has prepared the state’s largest industry for the reaction with its warning, “Civil unions backlash begins.”

Most of the blame for the veto has been heaped on Hawaii’s Mormon population. Though just 5 percent of the population, Oahu is home to a branch of Brigham Young University and the church as always been active in Hawaii politics.

The blame, however, should be placed directly on the state’s Jewish Republican governor. Though same-sex marriage is performed in most branches of Judaism, Lingle belongs to the small, right-wing Chabad movement.

The Honolulu newspaper said a boycott wouldn’t hurt people and businesses in the state that support civil unions. More of them should have lobbied the governor to sign. An airline that’s a member of an LGBT Chamber of Commerce could have warned that a boycott might mean fewer flights a week to her state. Large hotel chains that market to the LGBT community could have lobbied the governor to support the bill. Restaurants, stores and other businesses that have relied, in part, on business from the LGBT community might have made more of an effort to let the governor know that discrimination doesn’t create a good environment for travel.

Rabbi Peter Schaktman from the state’s largest synagogue made his opinions clear. Schaktman was a Houston rabbi before moving to Honolulu in 2005.

“People who oppose civil unions from a religious perspective are asking the state to enforce their version of morality on their behalf,” he told the governor.

His synagogue’s website continues to invite same-sex and opposite-sex couples to celebrate their weddings at Temple Emanu-El.

—  David Taffet