Jeffrey Payne reveals campaign logo

Jeffrey Payne, the former International Mr. Leather champ and local leather legend, is serious as a heart attack about seeking the Democratic nomination for Texas governor, as we reported earlier this week. And if actions speak louder than words, then look at the action Payne has taken: He’s launched a new logo, brand and hashtag to get his campaign off the ground. He’s also set up a Facebook page. Every journey begins with a first step.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Jeffrey Payne announces run for Texas governor

Jeffrey Payne

Dallas businessman Jeffery Payne on Friday, July 14, announced that he is running for governor of Texas, challenging Republican incumbent Greg Abbott, who he characterizes as a “disaster for Texans” and a governor who “offers nothing in the way of new ideas.”

“Texas needs a governor who believes in real Texas values, like integrity, honesty, freedom and independence,” Payne said in a statement announcing his candidacy. “It’s time we stopped wasting our time and money on silly legislation and start investing our time finding ways to help Texans, their families and businesses prosper.”

Payne pointed to his history of success as a businessman — from his respected court reporting firm, to his real estate dealings and his thriving nightclub, The Dallas Eagle. The candidate said he makes no secret of his active involvement in the Dallas LGBT community or his history as a former International Mr. Leather, a title that gave him a platform to promote many charity events.

He also said that his philanthropic work reflects his commitment to helping others not just in the LGBT community, but the greater Texas community, as well. He founded the Sharon St. Cyr Fund, an organization that assists people in obtaining hearing aids and provides grants for sign language interpreters at public events.

Payne, born in Maine, lost his mother when he was 3, and he spent much of his childhood in an orphanage before entering foster care at age 15. From that point on, he said, he was driven to succeed no matter what the circumstances. By age 23 he owned Payne’s Fine Jewelry, which marked the beginning of a series of successful ventures — ventures that were interrupted suddenly when Hurricane Katrina whipped out everything he had built up in New Orleans, where he lived.

Undeterred, Payne relocated to Dallas and started over again.

Payne said Texas has been good to him, and he believes it’s time he returned that good fortune. He has chosen to run for the governor’s office because he holds a strong commitment to real Texas values and truly believes he can make a positive difference in Texas politics as usual.

“It’s time we stopped letting the Republican Party run unopposed in this state,” Payne declared. “We need a governor who is not a career bureaucrat, but one with real world experience and dedication to making Texas a better, safer and healthier place for all Texans.”

 

—  Tammye Nash

BREAKING: Judge declines to toss Perry indictment case

Rick-Perry

Former Gov. Rick Perry

A state judge declined today (Tuesday, Jan. 27) to toss an indictment against former Gov. Rick Perry for abuse of power, the San Antonio New-Express reports.

Perry was indicted last summer after he threatened to veto funding for the public corruption unit in the Travis County District Attorney’s office. He stated the Democratic incumbent Rosemary Lehmberg had lost the public’s trust after being arrested for drunk driving. After Lehmberg refused to resign, Perry cut the funding.

Lehmberg, a Democrat, decided to not seek re-election.

A complaint filed by Texans for Public Justice alleged Perry abused his official capacity and accused him of “coercion of a public servant.”

Perry, who is mulling a second presidential run, has reportedly paid his legal team  $1 million out of his campaign war chest.

 

—  James Russell

Davis: Fort Worth is ground zero for my campaign

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Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis

A little over two months into her run for the Texas governor’s office, state Sen. Wendy Davis said on Saturday that Fort Worth is “ground zero” for her campaign.

Davis spoke to a packed-in crowd of supporters at 219 South Main St., enforcing the message that people from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds can achieve educational and professional success. Davis has often told the story of her impoverished background and how she worked to overcome it. A single mother at 19, she earned a law degree from Harvard after attending community college and graduating from Texas Christian University.

Political watchers have said a gubernatorial race can’t succeed without an Austin-based campaign headquarters, but Davis said she has proven them wrong before.

“When I ran for the state Senate in 2008, pundits all across the state said there was no way we could win, and obviously we did,” Davis said.

Education reform and equality issues occupy much of Davis’ speeches. When asked, however, how far into her term as governor, if elected, would she address marriage equality in Texas and how, Davis replied, “I would rely on the Legislature to do that.”

—  Steve Ramos

Wendy Davis may announce her intention to run for governor this week

State Sen. Wendy Davis addresses the crowd at the Tarrant County Stonewall Democrats Spring Fundraising Kick-off Party in Fort Worth Wednesday, May 23. (Anna Waugh/Dallas Voice)

State Sen. Wendy Davis

State Sen. Wendy Davis may announce her poltical intentions to run for governor later this week.

She had planned an announcement on whether she would run for re-election to her Senate seat or for governor after Labor Day until her father became ill. He died earlier this month.

Davis’ father was Stage West founder Jerry Russell.

To run a competitive campaign against Attorney General Greg Abbott, who is seeking the Republican nomination, Davis would need to raise at least $40 million. Advisers are confident she would be able to do that.

Davis sent the following announcement to supporters and followers today:

—  David Taffet

WATCH: Perry’s ‘Brokeback Mountain’ encore

Below is Rick Perry’s latest ad from South Carolina, entitled “President of Honor,” which is apparently designed to pander appeal to the state’s large military population. We noticed that Perry appears several times during the ad in the same jacket he wore in his infamous anti-gay ad “Strong” — which, as we all know, is quite similar to the jacket Heath Ledger wore in Brokeback Mountain. It’s interesting that despite all the parodies featuring the jacket, Perry hasn’t abandoned the tan Carharrt. Maybe the governor and his campaign are just completely oblivious, as would be suggested by this tidbit out of South Carolina from Politico:

As if Rick Perry didn’t have enough problems.

The Texas governor was greeted at a restaurant in Anderson, S.C., by a young woman who posed for a photo with the Texas governor while saying it is “good to see someone as homophobic and racist as you.”

He smiled, took the photo and moved on.

—  John Wright

Did Rick Perry come out in support of gays? (No, of course not, don’t be an idiot)

This is what frustrates me the most about dealing with hypocrites: They can’t keep their bigotry and their demagoguery straight.

Last month, the Texas Governor and GOP hopeless (let’s face it — he can’t be hopeful) ran an ad in Iowa in which he expressed a degree of disgust that “gays can serve openly in the military” but children can’t celebrate Christmas (huh?). He was taken to task by an Iowa teen, and again reiterated his hate-mongering.

But now that the Iowa caucuses are down to the wire, Perry is desperate to show his conservative roots. So all weekend, he’s been touting his serious commitment to supporting veterans who deserve our help — for instance, through care at VA hospitals and with job assistance and family services — after they return from overseas.

Well, since he obviously knows gays actually do serve — one of the few facts he’s gotten right in a while — then it logically follows Perry would condemn any employers who discriminate again a gay serviceman applying for a job, or would endorse an extension to same-sex spouses of veterans of  health another benefits for their injured spouses.

Only I’m sure he doesn’t.

So basically, it means you can believe a word Perry says, because his rules have a litmus test: You must first share his perverse religious faith that teaches hatred toward our fellow man in order to understand who, exactly, is entitled to our support. It seems to me a little like Orwell’s “All animals are created equal, but some are more equal than others.”

So give us a straight answer, Rick: Do you unconditionally support returning veterans, or did you lie yet again? Because logic demands it be one or the other… though logic never seemed to matter to folks like him before.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Perry can’t recall sodomy ruling

Perry.Rick

Gov. Rick Perry

In his latest gaffe, Texas Gov. Rick Perry drew a blank today when asked about Lawrence v. Texas — the landmark case overturning the state’s sodomy law — during a campaign stop in Iowa. ABC News reports:

A voter at a meet and greet asked him to defend his criticism of limited government in the case.

“I wish I could tell you I knew every Supreme Court case. I don’t, I’m not even going to try to go through every Supreme Court case, that would be — I’m not a lawyer,” Perry said at the Blue Strawberry Coffee Shop here. “We can sit here and you know play I gotcha questions on what about this Supreme Court case or whatever, but let me tell you, you know and I know that the problem in this country is spending in Washington, D.C., it’s not some Supreme Court case.” ….

Asked by Ken Herman, a columnist with the Austin American Statesman, for clarification on whether he knew what the case concerned, Perry responded, “I’m not taking the bar exam…I don’t know what a lot of legal cases involve.”

When told that the Supreme Court case struck down the Texas sodomy law, Perry said, “My position on traditional marriage is clear and I don’t know need a law. I don’t need a federal law case to explain it to me.”

The Texas governor referenced Lawrence v. Texas in his 2010 book Fed Up!, calling it one of the court cases in which “Texans have a different view of the world than do the nine oligarchs in robes.”

In 2002, after the U.S. Supreme Court said it would hear Lawrence v. Texas, Perry told the Associated Press that he felt the sodomy law was “appropriate.”

“I think our law is appropriate that we have on the books,” Perry said.

UPDATE: Here’s the video:

—  John Wright

Another misstep for Perry’s campaign

 

Hateful bigotry of Texas governor’s presidential campaign ad is surpassed only by its asininity

David Webb
The Rare Reporter

Just when I thought the 2012 Rick Perry for President campaign couldn’t get any nuttier, guess what? Yep, it managed to get sillier with the release of Gov. Perry’s campaign video attacking openly gay and lesbian members of the U.S. Armed Services.

Never mind that in the video dubbed “Strong” Perry is wearing the same type of tan Carhartt ranch coat actor Heath Ledger wore in the gay romance movie Brokeback Mountain, and that the video’s musical score was inspired by gay American composer Aaron Copland. The message is ridiculous, and the video’s distinction of registering more than half a million “dislikes” (646,000 dislikes to 20,000 likes) is probably attributable as much to its asininity as its hateful bigotry.

Facing the camera, against a wooded backdrop that conjures images of the big gay movie’s outdoor scenes, Perry declares that he is not “ashamed to admit” he is a Christian.

“You don’t need to be in the pew every Sunday to know that something is wrong when gays can serve openly in the military, but our kids can’t openly celebrate Christmas and pray in schools,” he declares.

Perry adds that as president he would “end Obama’s war on religion” and “fight against liberal attacks on our religious heritage.”

Aside from the imagery and the music of the video making Perry and his campaign staff again look like fools, the idea that openly gay and lesbian members of the military somehow undermine Christianity is ludicrous. Or are children supposed to resent gay and lesbian soldiers because they get to go off and fight wars while they are stuck at school, unable to pray out loud?

I doubt that it will come as a shock to Perry, his staff, the voting public or even school children that there are openly gay and lesbian people working in every level of local, state and federal government and private business — even churches — without harm to Christianity. Yet for some reason they expect everyone to swallow the notion that openly gay and lesbian members of the military will put the nation under the control of pagans.

What about openly gay and lesbian soldiers who observe Christianity by going to church, reading their Bibles and praying? Are they to be the demise of their own religion?

And do U.S. citizens who are Jewish or members of other faiths matter at all to Perry and his campaign staff? Under the Perry plan, are the children of those citizens to be indoctrinated into Christianity?

As to Perry’s promise in the video’s closing, it would be news to everybody if it were learned President Obama had declared a war on religion. Those laws regulating Christmas displays and school prayer were put in motion decades ago, a long time before Obama ever thought about running for political office.

Open prayer in school was banned by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1962 when Perry was in grade school. Surely he remembers.

Ultimately, I can’t imagine many people viewing the overturn of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” which was supported by a majority of the American public, enacted by Congress and signed into law by Obama, as an assault on Christianity.

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said last week that Obama was probably not aware of the Perry campaign video claiming he had declared war on Christianity, but regardless the president is proud of his support of LGBT issues.

The video looks like evidence of the Perry campaign’s desperation following the governor’s disintegration in national polls since his announcement in August he would run for president. Perry dropped from a double-digit front leader status to 5 percent following a series of debate missteps and disastrous public appearances that showed him to be outmatched on the debate stage by every other Republican in the campaign.

A new American Research Poll shows Perry now has 13 percentage points in Iowa, the first primary state. But he still is in back of the pack, far behind Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney.

Regardless of where Perry goes in the polls, I’m confident he will again sabotage himself in some manner, unless he has an undercover gay or lesbian person on his campaign staff doing it for him.

Speaking of which, after Perry’s anti-gay ad was released, leaders from the gay Republican group GOProud outed one of the campaign’s consultants as gay. It was later learned that the consultant, Tony Fabrizio, had written an email prior to the ad’s release calling it “nuts.”

But aside from that effort and the obvious aspect of Fabrizio being a traitor who apparently has sacrificed the LGBT community to make a few bucks for himself, he doesn’t appear to have been doing a good job of using his expertise as a gay man to help Perry navigate difficult waters. Who will ever forget the image of Perry deep-throating a corn dog at an Iowa state fair while Romney graciously nibbled on his?

What were they thinking when they handed a corn dog to Perry, who has been fighting rumors that he is secretly gay for years?

In fact, a common question today is, “How did he ever go so far in Texas politics?”

There is only one group of people — other than personal friends, relatives and other beneficiaries of the governor’s influence as an elected official — to whom Perry still appeals: That is conservative Christians who put their religious beliefs ahead of every other consideration, regardless of whose rights get trampled upon in the process.

No wonder Perry released such a video and continues to offer it on his campaign website, but I don’t think there are enough of them to vote him into office.

Many people who started off supporting Perry have now fled from his camp, saying that his performance as a presidential candidate has brought about a national embarrassment. The worst part of it is that there is no telling what Perry and his campaign will do next. But it’s bound to be a dilly.

David Webb is a veteran journalist who has covered LGBT issues for the mainstream and alternative media for three decades. Contact him at davidwaynewebb@yahoo.com or http://therarereporter.blogspot.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 16, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Book investigates Rick Perry gay rumors

Glen Maxey

Glen Maxey

Glen Maxey, the only out LGBT person to serve in the Texas Legislature, has just released a new book “Head Figure Head: The Search for the Hidden Life of Rick Perry” investigating rumors that Texas governor and Republican presidential hopeful Rick Perry has a history of sexual tryst with men. Maxey used relationships built during his decades of experience in Austin as a legislative aide, state representative and lobbyist to track down the first hand accounts of men who have claimed sexual relationships with Perry contained in the book.

“Head Figure Head” is only available in e-book form via Amazon at this time. A quick e-flip through the pages promises an exciting read.

—  admin