Texas Republican candidates give odd answers to prove they oppose the gays

Abbott.Greg

Attorney General Greg Abbott

A poll of top Republican candidates for statewide office in Texas found that all oppose LGBT rights. But their answers — and lack of answers in some areas — shows they might not really believe what they’re saying.

Gubernatorial candidate Greg Abbott was the only one to answer all of the questions, according to the Associated Press. All made it clear they oppose marriage equality, but many didn’t answer questions about employment nondiscrimination. Those that did said nondiscrimination infringes on religious freedom.

Abbott provided some of the more bizarre answers. Although he opposes employment nondiscrimination because of religious concerns, his answer reflected that religious groups are protected.

“Both the U.S. and Texas Constitutions protect faith-based organizations from being coerced into employing persons in a way that would require them to violate their faith,” he wrote.

So an employer like Cathedral of Hope is not required to hire someone who believes in discrimination against gay or transgender people, because that would conflict with their faith.

Another question showed that Abbott either has wrong information or actually doesn’t believe any of the crap that’s been coming out of his mouth.

“Do you believe that homosexuality is a disorder that requires treatment?” AP asked.

“I am not a doctor, a scientist or God,” Abbott wrote. “I cannot render judgment on a person’s sexuality. I can, however, refer you to the American Psychological Association on the matter.”

The APA hasn’t considered homosexuality a disorder since 1975 and more recently has issued a statement in favor of marriage equality. So either Abbott’s answer is that homosexuality is not a disorder or he thinks it is and thinks the APA supports his position. Or more likely, he knows what the APA says and knows most religious bigots don’t.

In some cases, candidates answered the question they wanted to answer without answering the question they were asked.

“Do you support equal civil rights for lesbian, gay and bisexual citizens?” AP asked.

“Current statutes adequately address the issue of equality before the law and I would oppose laws that provide preferential treatments based on lifestyle choices,” Tom Pauken, candidate for governor wrote.

But he was asked about “equal civil rights.” He was not asked about “preferential treatments.” He’s right, of course, that those who choose a heterosexual lifestyle should not be given preferential treatments.

—  David Taffet

Wisconsin’s got bigger nuts than Texas

Rebecca Kleefisch

Wisconsin is generally considered a liberal state. Milwaukee is the only city in the country that ever elected a socialist city government. Their senior senator, Russ Feingold, is one of the most liberal members of the Senate.

But like in New York, this election year has brought out Wisconsin’s right-wing crazies.

Here’s some current news on Wisconsin Republican candidates, proving — yet again — that Texas Republicans are downright mainstream and boring.

Rebecca Kleefisch didn’t mean to sound insensitive when she compared same-sex marriage to marrying a table.

The former local TV news anchor (surprisingly for ABC, not Fox) is running on the Republican ticket for lieutenant governor of Wisconsin.

She said was talking about the state’s domestic partnership law that offers same-sex couples hospital visitation rights and estate planning rights.

She said the state can’t afford to just hand out money to anyone.

She didn’t explain how visiting someone in the hospital and helping to care for that person costs the state money. Or how probating a will that is not contested in court costs more than a legal fight between a partner and a family that won’t recognize the relationship. Seems like it’s her way that costs the state big bucks.

Well, she’s sorry. She’s still against marriage equality, not that Wisconsin offers marriage equality. Please vote for her.

Jennifer London is running for Wisconsin’s 4th Congressional District. Her solution to the Social Security problem is to back all of the trust fund’s savings with gold.

The Great Lakes are her environmental concern. To save them, she would close the St. Lawrence Seaway. No word on how she’d do that beyond her proposed legislation since the St. Lawrence is in Canada. War?

Then there’s Apostle David King, founder of the Milwaukee God Squad and Republican candidate for Wisconsin Secretary of State.

Charlette Harris filed a civil lawsuit today against King.

Harris, a lesbian, is accusing King of getting her drunk and getting her pregnant. She says they had lunch on Aug. 26. After he got her drunk, he took her to his home where she was too drunk to consent to sex, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

The paper reports King first suggested Harris get an abortion and then suggested his wife go with her for her ultrasound. I may not know much about heterosexual relationships, but even if this wasn’t rape, isn’t it odd for the adulterer to get his wife involved?

For the record, no apostles are on the ballot in Texas. No proposals to shut down the Rio Grande to deal with immigration or the environment. No real nutjobs to really make us proud. With all the crazies out there, I’m a little jealous that we don’t have our share.

—  David Taffet

Right-wing group blasts Texas Sen. John Cornyn for appearing at Log Cabin Republicans dinner

Sen. John Cornyn

A while back we said we hoped Sen. John Cornyn and Congressman Pete Sessions, two anti-gay Texas Republicans, would face backlash from the religious right for pandering at a Log Cabin Republicans dinner later this month. Well, it looks like our wish is already starting to come true!

The right-wing Cambridge Theological Seminary, which claims to have hundreds of member churches in Texas, has posted an open letter to Cornyn saying it plans to oppose him in his next re-election bid and instead support a Tea Party candidate.

“John Cornyn, the junior Senator from Texas has announced that he will attend a fundraiser held by the homosexual same-sex-marriage Log Cabin Republicans, whose mission is to support ‘favored status and special rights for gay and lesbian Americans,’” the group writes. “We urge all Texans to seek his replacement immediately. If he is this bold in public, what is he behind closed doors?”

The group goes on to slam Cornyn for not even having a drop-down menu on his website devoted to “Pro-family and/or anti-same-sex causes.” The group accuses Cornyn of betraying his nation and God by supporting “sodomizing, AIDS-causing homosexuals who molest and rape little boys …”

Politics makes strange bedfellows, folks, and Instant Tea hereby announces an informal alliance with the Cambridge Theological Seminary to defeat Cornyn in 2014, albeit for opposite reasons. (Who knows, maybe they’ll even send us one of the free degrees they offer online.) Below is the e-mail the group says it sent to Cornyn.

—  John Wright

Gov. Rick Perry links job creation, gay marriage

We’ve commented here repeatedly about how Texas Republicans — and most notably Gov. Rick Perry — have been largely avoiding LGBT issues so far this election cycle. But obviously Perry hasn’t completely forgotten about same-sex marriage, the issue he rode to re-election in 2006.

The Texas Tribune’s Ross Ramsey, who followed Perry during a day of campaigning last week, reports that the incumbent is still willing to gay-bait, only now he’s picking his spots — like barbecue restaurants in Temple. Or who knows, maybe Perry has just been saving it all for the stretch run.

In any case, Perry is also keeping his anti-gay rhetoric current, as he’s now linking same-sex marriage to job creation. We’ve bolded Perry’s quotation in this passage from the Tribune:

Social issues might be in the back seat, but they’re still in the car: “There is still a land of opportunity, friends — it’s called Texas,” Perry said. “We’re creating more jobs than any other state in the nation. … Would you rather live in a state like this, or in a state where a man can marry a man?”

So there you have it, folks. If you want to live in a state where a man can marry a man, you’ll have to sacrifice job creation. Never mind those studies showing the economic benefits of legalizing same-sex marriage. If you ask Perry, gays are probably to blame for the recession!

—  John Wright