Tori Amos: The gay interview

Tori1“Lighting, sweetie, lighting!” is Tori Amos’ theatrical retort to my compliment about how she’s still looking as radiant as she did at the launch of her career more than three decades ago. Now 50, and with her acclaimed 14th album, Unrepentant Geraldines, she’s facing age head-on. Candor isn’t unusual for the composer; from rape to religion and even her MILF status, she’s approached a bevy of topics too controversial for most artists.

That same directness extended to our recent conversation, prior to her appearance in Dallas on July 29 at the Winspear Opera House in support of the album, during which Amos chatted with our Chris Azzopardi about the LGBT influence on “Promise,” a duet with her daughter; being the muse for the big Frozen ballad; and the gay fans who share their “traumatic experiences” with her.

Dallas Voice:  How did your last several projects — Midwinter Graces, Night of Hunters and Gold Dust — reenergize the contemporary songwriting heard on Unrepentant GeraldinesAmos: All of them fit into giving me fresh perspective. Starting with Midwinter Graces, I was thrown into the deep end, studying carols from the last few hundred years and just immersing myself in a different genre. It’s almost as if it became a baton hand-off, from Midwinter Graces to Night of Hunters and Gold Dust, back and forth with The Light Princess [a musical written by Amos], which was floating between all these projects, because she’s been in development for five years. All of them were giving inspiration to the other. Each one was giving some kind of spark.

The spark linking all of those works is very evident.  They’re very interconnected, and The Light Princess cast recording — I’m producing that for Mercury Universal — will be out globally in early 2015, and we’re making the record on the tour, so [Unrepentant Geraldines] will be affecting that. They all gift each other something. I don’t always know what it is when it’s happening; you just get energy from one that propels another.

There is a freshness, a new perspective [on the new CD] that I was able to bring to contemporary writing because of all these other projects that had shown me different possibilities in structure and different possibilities in line. In that way, I feel like I’ve been rejuvenated by these other projects. When these songs were coming, they were coming not for me to make a record; they were just coming so that I could process what I was going through. And I didn’t share them with anybody. They were for my own private notebook.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Gloria Estefan: The gay interview

Screen shot 2014-01-15 at 9.53.48 AMEditor’s note: As part of our upcoming Music Issue on Friday, we offer this interview by our Chris Azzopardi with queen of Latin pop Gloria Estefan, who discusses her planned Broadway show, her gay fans and how drag queens saved her.

You’d be lucky to see Gloria Estefan busting out the conga these days, but that doesn’t mean she’s not keeping on her toes. A spot on Glee last season, a new album, an upcoming Broadway musical, restaurants, hotels — the singer is busier than ever, she says. We caught up with Estefan to chat about plans for her upcoming autobiographical stage show, being “saved” by gay fans and punking people with Gloria drag queens.

Gloria2Dallas Voice: What’s life like now for you compared to what it was in the ’80s?  Estefan: Supposedly I’m leading a quieter life, but I’m busier than I’ve ever been! In the ’80s, I was on the same cycle: write, go into the studio, record, then go on tour. All I could do was sleep, exercise and sing in the shows. I could do absolutely nothing else. Now, we just do so many other things. Back then we didn’t have two hotels and seven restaurants — all that came later — so in essence, we’re probably busier now than we’ve ever been. Plus: We’re working on that Broadway show. It’s very exciting.

The Broadway musical is inspired by your own life. How did the idea first come to you?  We’ve had many offers through the years to do something like this, so we’ve been working on an idea for a Broadway-type show for over 10 years. You can’t do it on your entire life. We’ve been able to synthesize what part of our story would make a great Broadway show. It’s really on the fast track, and we hope to be done with the book by January. It’s being written by Alex Dinelaris, who just did The Bodyguard in London. He wrote that and he really gets it. I really loved his approach. We’re incorporating the songs with a meaning into the storyline, and of course I’ll do some rewrites, some interesting little turns and some new music as well. I love that, because the creative process for me is my favorite part of everything. Also, we’re very excited about finding a young Gloria and Emilio [Estefan, her husband]. Whoever plays me already has their work cut out for her!

There’s been talk of Jennifer Lopez playing you. How likely is that?  I don’t know where people get all these rumors, quite honestly. I don’t think J. Lo would wanna do eight shows a week on Broadway. I don’t think that’s high on her list of priorities! But yeah, it’s an iconic role and I would love to find somebody new — a breakout. I honestly think there’s a reality show in the search for them, so we may even do that. It’d be a fun thing to share. After seeing Smash – I used to love that show and I don’t know why it got canceled – it’d be cool to do something like that.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

‘Carrie’ star Chloe Grace Moretz: The (spooky) gay interview

Chloe Moretz;Julianne Moore

Julianne Moore and Chloe Moretz

With Halloween just days away, our Chris Azzopardi decided to chat with Carrie star Chloe Grace Moretz — about gay brothers, a queer take on a classic and not being a lesbian.

We might not have telekinetic powers, but the gay community knows what it’s like to be Carrie. We know the torment from kids at school. We know the pressure from parents to change who we are.

It only makes sense, then, that a lesbian filmmaker — Boys Don’t Cry writer/director Kimberly Peirce — give her spin on Stephen King’s creepy classic, first adapted to screen in 1976 with Sissy Spacek in the titular role.

The reboot (which we reviewed here) stars 16-year-old Chloë Grace Moretz as Carrie White, the teen with the power to move people — literally. (Julianne Moore plays her intensely religious mother.) We caught up with Moretz to chat about her gay brothers inspiring this take on the iconic character, the queerness of Peirce’s reimagining and why people think the actress is a lesbian (but shouldn’t).

Dallas Voice: As if you weren’t cool enough, you recently told the press that you stuck up for your brothers when they were being teased for being gay.  Moretz: Aww, thank you. People say that, but I don’t even do it to have that effect. I do it because I know what’s right, and I know what’s wrong, and I grew up with my two gay brothers who were completely ostracized and manipulated into thinking what they were feeling, from the time they were born, was wrong and sinful and potentially life-threatening. That’s so aggravating to think about that when someone can, you know, smoke their entire life and people would never judge them. But just because you choose to be with the same sex, people can be a little cagey.

How much of your brothers’ personal experiences became a part of your experience on Carrie? Did you have them in mind while you were playing her?  Yeah, of course. Whenever you play a character that is going through certain things and you can, in some way, understand them even more — when you have a personal aspect that can actually relate to the — then it takes [the role] to a whole other level, because you’ve seen it and you’ve experienced it.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Janelle Monae: The gay interview

Janelle2The ambiguity of Janelle Monáe can be summed up in her own two words: “top secret.” That (plus “I’m sorry, I can’t tell you”) is all she says about her pompadour when asked how it stays in a perfect pouf. It’s the kind of James Bond elusiveness that’s left a lot to the imagination since the Kansas City native spawned her fembot alter ego. The Electric Lady, the third in the saga, is designed to be a prequel to the narrative of 2010’s The ArchAndroid. It’s very gay — but it doesn’t mean she is.

Our Chris Azzopardi talked to the pop singer — about gender-bending fashions, her new album and more. 

Dallas Voice: People have speculated that the album’s first single, “Q.U.E.E.N.,” alludes to your attraction to women. And on “Givin Em What They Love,” you refer to a woman who follows you back to the lobby for some “undercover love.” Are people reading too much into the lesbian themes of this album and applying them to you?  Monae: I actually have never heard that. This is the first time I’m hearing it. But I will say that a lot of my work always comes from an authoritative stance, so it may not be about me; it may just be about a story, or something that I’ve witnessed, or my imagination. You just never know.

A lot of people are relating this music directly to you.  And that’s fine. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with being gay or lesbian or straight or black or green or purple, so I’m OK with that.

“Q.U.E.E.N.” uses phrases like “throwing shade” and “serving face,” which are often heard in drag culture. Has the drag world influenced your style and how you present yourself and your music?  Yes. I think it is an art form that’s so funny and so inspiring, so I use it in my lyrics. I have gay friends who speak in this language, and it’s just hilarious and entertaining and I thought it would be cool to, you know, give them something to kiki about.

Because of your fondness for suits, people have described you in some ways as being a drag king.  Right.

How do you feel about the term “gender bender” as it’s applied to you?  I think it’s awesome. I think it’s uniting; I’m a uniter. I won’t allow myself to be a slave to my own interpretation of myself nor the interpretations that people may have of me. I just live my life, and people can feel free to discuss whatever it is that they think and use whatever adjectives they feel. It’s a free country.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Joseph Gordon-Levitt: The gay interview

DON JON ADDICTION

Who doesn’t see Joseph Gordon-Levitt as the “perfect man?” Well, the one man who knows him best: Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

After playing a gay hustler in Mysterious Skin, a Mormon homophobe in Latter Days and Batman’s cool sidekick in The Dark Knight Rises, the actor takes on a porn-obsessed womanizer in his latest film Don Jon, a sex comedy he wrote, directed and stars in that contends there’s more to a person than meets the eye. 

Surely, plenty of Gordon-Levitt meets the eye in Don Jon: that chest, those arms and all the near nakedness of the New Jersey lothario he plays. Yeah, it’s easy to see why people might think he’s pretty perfect.

In our interview with Chris Azzopardi, Gordon-Levitt discusses the dangers of believing he’s the ideal mate, contributing to the gay rights movement and what he’s really doing during those masturbation scenes in Don Jon.

Note: Don Jon opens today, and Saturday at the AMC North Park theater will be “gay night,” with cocktails at 6:30 p.m. and show at 7:45 p.m.

Dallas Voice: Let’s talk about this intense, seductive look on your face during those masturbation scenes. What were you actually thinking about? And were you really watching porn?  JGL: Nah, I wasn’t really looking at porn. But I was pretending I was looking at porn.

I’ve never pretended to watch porn.  I have now!

There’s a bit of sex in the movie — and you’re always the one having it. How do you direct yourself in a sex scene?  See, the sex scenes — with one exception — are very, very highly stylized and are not so much scenes that play out in real time; they’re more like narrated storybook versions of a look inside the mind of this guy, and so shooting them is like putting together a puzzle. They’re made of lots of little pieces. When you put the puzzle together it seems like a sex scene, but when you’re shooting it, it’s not like that at all.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Margaret Cho on coming out as bi, serving as ‘prime minister of the gays’

Drop Dead Diva, EP 504

Every season, the Lifetime series Drop Dead Diva goes out of its way to include a specific gay storyline for its lawyer character. This season’s episode, which aired last night, featured a pro baseball player who is hiding his homosexuality — even though it may get him convicted of murder.

Co-star Margaret Cho and executive producer Josh Berman sat down with the media to discuss the episode, gays in sports … and whether Cho is really the prime minister of the gays.

If you missed the first several episodes, you can catch up either on-demand or on iTunes. You can watch a clip of last night’s episode here. Below is a transcript of the chat with Berman and Cho.

Question: Josh, you tackled gay proms, gay sperm … was gay sports just the next arena that you needed to dive into for this episode?  Josh Berman: Well I think gays in sports is certainly a hot topic right now. We started working on this episode before it became such a prominent issue and getting such coverage in the news. So I’m thrilled that we are hitting this zeitgeist shed again with gay and lesbian issues. I do think that, you know, sports is one of the last frontiers where men and women feel they unfortunately need to be closeted. So it was important for me to address that issue.

Margaret, you’re all over this episode whether you’re helping Stacy with sperm donors or helping Jane with her case .…  Margaret Cho: Terri is always doing anything and everything. She’s kind of like a cross between like Alfred and Batman — she’s kind of like the enabler for everything. But what I really love about this episode is that it really talks about an issue that’s very timely, which is, athletes being able to come out of the closet. And I must note that there is a lot of sexism when it comes to this kind of stuff because Martina Navratilova came out as a lesbian over 25 years ago. Martina Navratilova came out when Reagan was in office. I really want to make sure that her contribution to sports, to the LGBT presence in sports, is really noted. And I’m really, really proud of this episode because it goes into the story about how we look at men in sports and we have to sort of have an idea of who they are and what they’re supposed to be. And I think sports in general is quite a homoerotic art form unto itself. So it’s surprising that there’s not more [athletes who are] out actually, but I love this episode because it really talks about some of these very current issues.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Matthew Morrison: The gay interview

LMatthew1ast week, we reviewed Matthew Morrison’s solo CD, and frankly, we weren’t kind. But that has little to do with Morrison’s talent onstage and on the TV show Glee, as well as his bona fides as an ally of the LGBT community.

Morrison, who originated the studly Link Larkin during the Broadway run of Hairspray prior to a Tony nomination for his stint in The Light in the Piazza, sat down with our Chris Azzopardi to talk about his inspirations. The full interview is below.

Dallas Voice: Where did it all begin for you? When did you first start singing? Matthew Morrison: I first started singing in fifth grade. I grew up in Southern California and my parents took me to Arizona for the summer and my grandma put my cousin and I in a children’s theater production of this show called The Herdmans Go to Camp. I’m sure you’ve heard of it.

Yeah, it was big on Broadway, right? Exactly. It had a great run. [Laughs] So, it was this little made-up show and I was so lucky to have found my passion at such a young age in doing that show. I came back to Southern California after the summer and told my parents that I wanted to be in children’s theater and that started the whole thing.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Cyndi Lauper, who’ll be at HOB on Wed., talks ‘Kinky Boots,’ gay rights

Cyndi2Even before this year’s Tonys, the legendary Cyndi Lauper was already considered a champion: A champion of the Grammys. A champion of the pop charts. A champion of gay rights.

But as a teary-eyed Lauper accepted her Tony statuette for composing the music for the smash Kinky Boots (it also was named best musical of the year, and four other Tonys), the coming-of-age sensation about a drag queen and a shoemaker as unlikely business partners, she was recognized for something she had never been before: The girl who just wanted to have fun, with her apple-red hair and heavy Queens accent, is now a champion of Broadway.

Between gigs on her She’s So Unusual Tour, which opens at the House of Blues in Dallas on Wednesday, Lauper gave our Chris Azzopardi a ring recently to chat about her emotional night at the awards ceremony, freaking out rock stars with her “wildly nutty” persona and the reason she’s always stood up for her gay fans. Read the full interview below.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

The gay interview: Ezra Miller

In the print edition this week, we have Larry Ferber’s interview with The Perks of Being a Wallflower writer-director Stephen Chbosky; here, our celebrity hunter Chris Azzopardi sat down with one of that film’s stars, Ezra Miller. Miller talks about the cathartic experience of being a confident teen, his happy upbringing and why he’s never met a straight man.

The perks of Being Ezra Miller

Twenty is a young age to have already played two unique characters — from the dark to the fearless. But Ezra Miller —  who was Tilda Swinton’s evil son in We Need to Talk About Kevin and plays Patrick, the lovable outsider with swagger in the film adaptation of the coming-of-age novel The Perks of Being a Wallflower, opening Friday in Dallas — the boy every gay person wishes he could be. Even Miller.

The young actor talked about not being that kid in high school, breaking label barriers and coming from a “whole queer-ass family” — who dressed him in drag.

Dallas Voice: What was your high school experience? Were you out then?  Ezra Miller: Yeah, definitely. But I wasn’t shouting it out. I was unabashedly me. I was always having to leave high school, though, because I started working, so that was pulling me out of school. When I’d come back, there was a certain resentment: “You are no longer one of us. You have betrayed our pack.” And I dropped out of high school when I was 16 years old because, first of all, the form and function of the schooling system never made any sense to me in the context of education, but also there was some ostracizing at play. At that point in my youth experience, I knew that feeling all too well. I immediately realized that I had just turned 16 and that it was best, and technically legal, for me to flee.

How was it playing a character that you wished you could’ve been in school?  I came out of the movie feeling like I had a bunch to learn from the character I just played, and then I came to the unfortunate conclusion that he was a fictional character and he didn’t exist. I mean, to be able to hold your dignity and your pride, and to be able to empower yourself and love yourself in high school, is a feat.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

The Gay Interview: Katy Perry

Our correspondent Chris Azzopardi got a sit-down (well, via transatlantic phone) with pop star Katy Perry, just in time for the release of her concert documentary, Katy Perry: Part of Me 3D, which comes out today.  The patriotic pop princess talks the film, kissing gay boys and fighting hate with love bullets.

 KATY PERRY IN 3D

It was not really last Friday night, but it still happened: Katy Perry called from London, where it was nearly 1 a.m. If life really does imitate art, she smelled like a mini-bar on a night that’s soon to be a blacked-out blur, right?

“Not tonight,” she insists. “I have to play and be professional tomorrow, but maybe after the show I’ll be having a couple of Shirley Temples with some adult juice in them.”

We spoke with Perry just after she made a surprise appearance in London for a screening of her new film, Katy Perry: Part of Me 3D, a docu-concert chronicling the California girl’s evolution from gospel-singing daughter of two pastors to international pop phenom … with the most lethal boobs in the world.

During our interview, Perry told us what else they shoot besides whipped cream, how the gay community can relate to her movie and why Madonna doesn’t scare her. 

—  Arnold Wayne Jones