Anti-gay El Paso candidate says earthquake and tsunami in Japan were a curse from God

On Monday we told you how several anti-gay candidates are running for El Paso City Council in the wake of the ongoing battle over domestic partner benefits for municipal workers.

Well, one of those anti-gay candidates, Malcolm McGregor III, told ABC 7 he believes the tsunami and earthquake in Japan were a curse from God.

“Japan had built tsunami walls along their coasts but this tsunami was bigger than that. No matter what you say, they either weren’t blessed with protection or they were cursed with an earthquake,” McGregor said. “God did say, Christ did say that earthquakes would increase in the last days and that’s what we’re seeing.”

McGregor is part of the group El Pasoans for Traditional Family Values, which sponsored a successful ballot initiative to rescind DP benefits in November, after the benefits were approved by the City Council. McGregor is also a defendant in the pending federal lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the ballot initiative.

—  John Wright

The Nooner: El Paso benefits battle, Houston GLBT Political Caucus, Ricky Gervais

Your lunchtime quickie from Instant Tea:

• Federal judge blocks enforcement of anti-gay El Paso ballot initiative, questions definition of “traditional family values.” Gay rights group protests outside Barnes & Noble during book-signing by pastor who was behind initiative.

• New president of Houston GLBT Political Caucus discusses group’s agenda.

• Texas ENDA introduced again but unlikely to pass.

• Slain gay Portugese journalist’s family dumps ashes down Times Square subway grate.

• Did host Ricky Gervais go too far at the Golden Globes? (video above)

—  John Wright

El Paso voters rescind domestic partner benefits for city workers — and possibly for retirees too

El Paso was home to one of the few, if not the only, anti-gay initiative on the ballot anywhere in the U.S. on Tuesday. And The El Paso Times reports that the measure to roll back domestic partner benefits for city employees passed easily:

The ballot initiative was supported by conservative religious groups that took aim at the city’s domestic partners ordinance from the time that it was passed by the City Council last year. But the way the initiative was worded caused confusion among some voters — and questions about how city officials will implement it.

“I’m sure there will be some legal action,” Mayor John Cook said.

Fewer than two dozen city employees receive the benefit. Opponents say it sends the message that the city approves of homosexuality and of heterosexual couples living out of wedlock.

And the initiative struck a chord with a majority of the El Paso electorate.

The story goes on to say there are problems with the wording of the initiative, which says, “The city of El Paso endorses traditional family values by making health benefits available only to city employees and their legal spouse and dependent children.”

The meaning of “endorse” is unclear, according to the mayor, and city legal staff says the measure could be interpreted to exclude retirees from DP benefits.

Good. Let’s hope it gets tied up in court for a long time.

—  John Wright