‘Traditional values’ take a hit in the polls

HIGH AND LOW | Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, right, had the highest favorability ratings of possible Republican presidential candidates in a recent CNN poll. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, left, had the highest ‘unfavorability’ rating.

Percentage of people saying government should ‘promote traditional values’ drops below 50 percent for the 1st time

LISA KEEN | Keen News Service
lisakeen@mac.com

“Traditional values” didn’t do too well in the latest CNN poll of American adults.

For the first time in the 18 years since the question was first asked, the percentage of adults thinking that the government should “promote traditional values” has dropped below 50 percent.

Of the 1,015 adults surveyed between June 3 and 7, 46 percent said the government should promote traditional values, but 50 percent said government should “not favor any set of values.” Four percent had no opinion.

The survey results, which were released Sunday, June 12, had a margin of error of plus or minus three points.

Just last year, 53 percent of respondents said government should promote “traditional values” and, according to CNN, past polls have shown support as high as 59 percent (in October 2001 and January 1996).

But since the question was first asked, in 1993, responses have fluctuated dramatically.

In 2001, for instance, the question was asked in September and again in October. In September 2001, 53 percent said government should promote “traditional values”; in October, 59 percent said so.

The previous low point for traditional values came in September 2005, when only 50 percent of adults said government should promote them.

CNN did not explain what it meant by “traditional values,” but in political discourse, the phrase has emerged as code for “anti-gay.”

The right-wing Traditional Values Coalition defines traditional values as including the view that homosexuality is an abomination, but also includes views that are anti-abortion, pro-death penalty and pro-religion.

Some polls have asked questions concerning “traditional marriages,” usually seeking respondents’ views on allowing same-sex couples to marry.

Two years ago, Fox News asked, “Do you think straight people in your community who have traditional religious values are tolerant of gays and lesbians and their beliefs?”

Sixty-seven percent said they think straight people in their communities are “very tolerant” or “somewhat tolerant.”

CNN’s question was asked this year along with questions concerning Republican candidates for president, in a preview of CNN’s debate Monday night with seven GOP contenders.

CNN asked survey participants to express their opinions on 10 potential candidates. Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani, who has suggested he might run, had the highest favorability ranking.

Fifty-five percent of adults surveyed said they had a favorable opinion of Giuliani. He was followed by former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney with 39 percent, and U.S. Rep. Ron Paul of Texas with 34 percent.

Former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin earned the highest “unfavorability” rating: 52 percent of respondents said they had an unfavorable opinion of the former Alaska governor.

Palin was followed by former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, of whom 44 percent of respondents said they had an unfavorable opinion.

Interestingly, the respondents also identified Palin as the Republican who represents values of Republicans.

The Democratic Party fared better than the Republican Party in the poll. While 55 percent of those surveyed said they had a favorable view of the Democratic Party; only 49 percent had a favorable view of the GOP.

© 2011 Keen News Service. All rights reserved.

—  John Wright

BREAKING: Rep. Christian plans amendments aimed at eliminating LGBT resource centers

State Rep. Wayne Christian, R-Center

State Rep. Wayne Christian, R-Center, has filed two amendments to a bill that’s on today’s Texas House schedule designed to eliminate LGBT resource centers from Texas’ state universities.

Christian intends to offer the amendments to Senate Bill 1811, a large fiscal bill that has been stalled in the House for the last week. The first of the amendments is identical to language Christian added to House Bill 1 in April. It would require universities that appropriate state funds for their LGBT resource centers to equally fund centers for “family and traditional values.” Resource centers at both UT-Austin and Texas A&M are funded by student fees, not state funds, so it’s unclear how much of an impact the amendment would have.

Chrisitan’s second amendment, which is new, would prohibit any state funds from being spent on campus LGBT resource centers. It would also prohibit universities from housing the centers in state-owned buildings, effectively banning them from college campuses.

Read the full text of Christian’s proposed amendments to SB 1811 by going here and here.

SB 1811 was originally scheduled for the House floor on Thursday, but was delayed until today. With fights over the state’s budget getting increasingly heated, the debate on the bill is likely to take hours, which may cause the House to delay it until other business is finished. The bill must pass the House by midnight next Tuesday, May 24.

Students for Inclusive Resources, a group formed in response to Christian’s amendment to HB 1, has issued an action alert asking Texans to call their state representatives and tell them to oppose Christan’s amendments. To look up contact info for your representative, go here.

Stay tuned to Instant Tea for updates …

—  admin

Trans history unearthed in Prague, but existence of LGBTs in early cultures should be no surprise

Copper Age grave near Prague appears to be that of a trans woman.

Reports have surfaced this week on several websites with news of a grave unearthed in the Czech Republic of what archeologists are saying appears to be a transgender woman.

The grave, found in a suburb of Prague, contained a skeleton that, while anatomically male, was buried in the traditional manner of a woman. The UK LGBT news site Pink News reports that the skeleton and grave are thought to be about 5,000 years old, dating from between 2900 and 2500 B.C., and is from the Corded Ware culture of the Copper Age.

Archaeologists say that males from that era are usually found buried facing west, with their weapons interred with them. But this skeleton was buried in the manner reserved for women: facing east and surrounded by domestic jugs.

Pink News quotes Kamila Remišová, the head of the research team, as saying: “From history and ethnology, we know that when a culture had strict burial rules they never made mistakes with these sort of things.”

—  admin

Texas House OKs measure requiring schools with LGBT resource centers to spend equal amount on centers for ‘family and traditional values’

Wayne Christian

Public colleges and universities in Texas with LGBT resource centers would have to spend an equal amount on centers promoting “family and traditional values,” under a budget amendment approved by the House late Friday.

The amendment from State Rep. Wayne Christian, R-Center, passed by a vote of 110-24. From The Dallas Morning News:

While many members in the chamber cracked jokes and guffawed, the amendment’s author, Rep. Wayne Christian, said the University of Texas, Texas A&M and “some other schools” have centers promoting “alternative sexual practices.”

“I’m not treading on their rights to that, to teach alternative sexual behavior,” said Christian, R-Center. But he said they must match it, dollar for dollar, with advocating heterosexual, “traditional values.”

Meanwhile, the House defeated a proposed budget amendment that would have required school districts to report incidents of harassment and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The amendment from Rep. Garnet Coleman, D-Houston, was defeated by a vote of 97-49.

—  John Wright

A platform of ideas — bad ideas

Even conservative LGBTs shouldn’t drink the Texas GOP Kool-Aid

Hardy Haberman Flagging Left

The Texas Republican Party just had their state convention here in Dallas, and it is worth noting that they passed a new platform as well. For LGBT citizens it is a very important document.

The GOP of Texas passed a platform that is more parody that politics. The vehement rhetoric contained in this document should send a clear message to the folks claiming to be LGBT Republicans that they are not listened to and not wanted in the GOP.

I am speaking of the Log Cabin crowd and the even stranger GOProud group. I ask point blank: How can you support a party who writes this into their platform?

“Homosexuality — Homosexual behavior is contrary to the fundamental, unchanging truths that have been ordained by God, recognized by our country’s founders, and shared by the majority of Texans. Homosexuality must not be presented as an acceptable ‘alternative’ lifestyle in our public education and policy, nor should ‘family’ be redefined to include homosexual ‘couples.’

“We are opposed to any granting of special legal entitlements, refuse to recognize, or grant special privileges including, but not limited to: marriage between persons of the same sex (regardless of state of origin), custody of children by homosexuals, homosexual partner insurance or retirement benefits. We oppose any criminal or civil penalties against those who oppose homosexuality out of faith, conviction, or belief in traditional values.

“Texas Sodomy Statutes — We oppose the legalization of sodomy. We demand that Congress exercise its authority granted by the U.S. Constitution to withhold jurisdiction from the federal courts from cases involving sodomy.”

For all the talk of changing the GOP from the inside that the Log Cabin Republicans use as their excuse for supporting that party, I fail to see how they have had any effect. This latest platform seems even worse than before. A giant step backwards — but I guess that is no surprise for the GOP.

As far as ENDA, well the Texas GOP made it pretty clear they don’t want any of them new-fangled equal rights laws: “ENDA — We oppose this act through which the federal government would coerce religious business owners and employees to violate their own beliefs and principles by affirming what they consider to be sinful and sexually immoral behavior.”

How about hate crimes? Well, the Texas Republicans have something to say about that as well and they wrap it in a paragraph cynically entitled “Equality of All Citizens”: “We urge immediate repeal of the Hate Crimes Law. Until the Hate Crimes Law is totally repealed, we urge the Legislature to immediately remove the education curriculum mandate and the sexual orientation category in said Law.”

Now lest you think this platform is damaging only to LGBT Texans, take heart. Anyone who works for a living is fair game as well. These two single-sentence planks made me shiver: “Workers’ Compensation — We urge the Legislature to resist making Workers’ Compensation mandatory for all Texas employers.”

And: “Minimum Wage — We believe the Minimum Wage Law should be repealed.”

Needless to say there are extensive planks about immigration and border security, and they include this little nugget, “The repeal of the birthright citizenship”: “Birthright Citizenship — We call on the Legislative, Executive and Judicial branches of these United States to clarify Section 1 of the 14th amendment to limit citizenship by birth to those born to a citizen of the United States: with no exceptions.”

This platform has something for everyone, or should I say against everyone. The politically astute will note that most of these changes seem to be a bow to the “tea baggers” and are simply appeasements that were never intended to be written into law. I suppose those professing to be LGBT Republicans would take this approach to reading this hate-filled document, but I think it is far more serious than that.

Writing off the party platform as inconsequential might work if you live with the cognitive dissonance that some people do. But the platform is the basis of decisions that will be made by legislators who are elected and it will be held up as a litmus test for any GOP candidate during an election.

So what is this all about? Well it’s about waking up and looking at the reality of the GOP in Texas.

The party has swung so far right it looks more like a fringe group than the mainstream. It’s time LGBT voters stopped deceiving themselves and realize the Republican Party has anything but your best interests at heart.

You can be fiscally conservative and still not drink this Kool Aid.

In fairness, I am a Democrat, and though the Democratic leadership has been disappointing in its movement forward on all LGBT issues, at least there has been some movement. Yes it’s not as fast as I would like, and yes, I criticize both my party and my president. But at least they do not believe I am somehow tearing at the moral fabric of the country by my mere existence.

So to my LGBT Republican brothers and sisters, I have to paraphrase a question from everyone’s favorite moose hunter, Sarah Palin: “How’s that whole change from the inside thing going for you?”

Hardy Haberman is a longtime local LGBT activist and a member of Stonewall Democrats of Dallas. His blog is at http://dungeondiary.blogspot.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition June 25, 2010.

—  Dallasvoice

Florida wants to entice filmmakers to come to the Sunshine State – but not if your film is gay

On the day after Hollywood’s biggest party, On Top Magazine is reporting today that Florida lawmakers are considering a $75 million package of tax credits and incentives designed to lure filmakers to the Sunshine State to make their movies. But apparently, any films with LGBT storylines need not apply.

The bill’s package of tax credits and incentives would not be available to films that exhibit “nontraditional family values.” When asked if movies with gay characters should get the tax credits, state Rep. Stephen Precourt, an Orlando Republican, said, “That would not be the kind of thing I’d say we want to invest public dollars in.”

Current Florida law makes “family-friendly” film projects — those that smoking, sex, nudity or vulgar language — eligible for a 2 percent tax credit. Precourt’s bill would up that to 5 percent. An identical bill has been introduced in the Florida Senate.

—  admin