For Valentine’s Day, a resonant tale of ‘Loving’ and marriage

lovingstory03The very title of the Supreme Court decision in Loving v. Virginia is almost too perfect not to respect the irony of what it represented.

In 1958, Richard Loving married a half-black, half-Native American named Mildred in D.C., then returned to their home in rural Virginia. A month later, sheriff’s deputies entered their bedroom as they slept, arresting them for violating the state’s anti-miscegenation law, which forbid mixing of the races. They were jailed, convicted and eventually banished from the state in a manner more akin to ancient Rome than modern-day America.

Virginia was hardly unique — as Barack Obama’s parents could probably tell you, 21 states banned mixed-race marriages in 1958. It would take nine years, following protracted legal wrangling, before the Lovings could live openly and legally as Virginians.

It is impossible to watch The Loving Story — which debuts on HBO, again ironically, on Valentine’s Day — and not consider it (especially in light of the events this week) as it relates to Proposition 8 and the rights of gays to wed. Indeed, the statement by one of the lawyers representing the Lovings that “marriage is a fundamental right of man” — spoken more than 40 years ago — resonates sharply for any gay person who has felt a lesser person because of the bigotry and antiquated thinking of considering a fellow man as being “other” … whether by race or sexual orientation.

There’s surprisingly little directorial commentary in this documentary, which is made up substantially of real-time newsreel and other footage of the Lovings at home and on TV, and their lawyers strategizing. Little comment is needed, especially when the offensive language of the courts speaks volumes: The races were meant to stay on separate continents, the Virginia county judge opined, cuz that’s how God wanted it.

Two things especially stand out in The Loving Story. The first is the couple at the center of it: A man and a woman of modest means and humble background who simply and truly were in love and wanted to live as man and wife and couldn’t understand what they were doing wrong. The second is that the arguments made — back then and now, on both sides — apply equally to same-sex marriage issues. We’ve come a long way, but damn, we still have so far to go.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

Four stars. Airs Feb. 14 at 8 p.m. on HBO.

—  Kevin Thomas

Va. closes new enrollment for AIDS drug program

Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. — The Virginia Department of Health says that it’s been forced to close new enrollment into its AIDS Drug Assistance Program, which provides HIV-related medication for low-income people.

There are some exceptions, including allowing pregnant women and children 18 years old and younger to continue to enroll in the program. The department also reduced the number of drugs the program covers.

Virginia funds 14 percent of the $21.6 million program; the federal government covers the vast majority.

The Roanoke Times reports that Health Commissioner Karen Remley wrote in a December letter to health providers that ADAP won’t be able to keep pace with demand.

“ADAP is not categorized as an entitlement program, and therefore, funding is insufficient to provide medication coverage for all low-income or uninsured individuals. The current financial situation is now requiring even greater reliance upon the manufacturers’ patient assistance programs (PAPs),” she wrote.

State figures show that about 4,200 Virginians used ADAP last year.

Health officials say the number of Virginians living with HIV has increased 44 percent since 2000. About 64 percent lack health insurance, which would cover their treatments and medications.

—  John Wright