Taylor Dayne announced to perform at Black Tie

If you missed the full page ad in this week’s issue, then you might not know that singer Taylor Dayne has been added to the star-studded Black Tie Dinner that includes Modern Family‘s Jesse Tyler Ferguson and Academy Award-winner Marlee Matlin. Dayne has been added as the special musical performance of the night.

According to the press release, Dayne loves her gays. From Black Tie Dinner.

For years, Dayne has been a supporter of gay and lesbian rights, often performing at annual LGBT pride festivals, helping to make her a figure with great relevance and social significance within the LGBT community. According to Dayne, “My gay audience and followers are the most loyal and the most fun to perform for.”

Dayne is an American pop icon who has sold more than 75 million albums and singles worldwide. She has had 12 Billboard® top twenty songs, two Grammy® nominations and an American Music Award nomination. Her first single, “Tell it to My Heart,” appeared on the Hot 100 chart for 26 weeks and earned Dayne a Grammy® Award nomination for Best Pop Vocal Performance. Dayne’s top singles include “Love Will Lead You [Back],” “Prove Your Love,” and “[I'll] Always Love You.”

OK, “pop icon” might be a bit of an oversell, but seriously, those early ’90s hits like “With Every Beat of My Heart” and “Can’t Get Enough of Your Love” are pretty irresistible. Hopefully, she can squeeze them all in somehow.

—  Rich Lopez

Drawing Dallas • 05.13.11

YendorrFNL_3Yendor Reese stands against transphobia and homophobia —in heels

MARK STOKES  | Illustrator
mark@markdrawsfunny.com
Name and age: Yendor Reese, 27

Spotted at: Kroger’s on Cedar Springs

 

Occupation: Mortgage case worker
Yendor received his unusual name from his father Rodney, who had a unique sense of humor (it’s “Rodney” backwards). With his strong religious upbringing, it was a natural that this handsome Taurus would pursue a career in music. Originally planning to become a music minister, he first pursued a vocal performance (opera) major at TCU before switching to communications/human relations with a minor in religion and music. The change gave him a deeper understanding of other religions and lifestyles, providing him a gateway to his own coming out. He was the first African-American to win “Mr. TCU” in the history of that university.

Yendor was the lead singer for the soul/rock group Soulever Lift, but the group’s plans were set back when their lead guitarist was picked up by Erykah Badu. Yendor writes music and poetry, and plays tennis whenever he can find time in his busy schedule.

His thoughts on International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia: An occasional cross-dresser, Yendor takes a live-and-let-live approach to human understanding. “Why should anyone tell another person who they should love or how to dress or what sex they relate to more? Humans need every color to be a complete rainbow. This day is
a reminder that life is a little bit better with every color — even if it is pink.”

TracieFNL2_1Tracie Hardin combines a green thumb with an artist’s eye

MARK STOKES  | Illustrator
mark@markdrawsfunny.com

Name and age: Tracie Hardin, 26

Spotted at: FedExKinko’s on Greenville Avenue

Occupation: Botanist/creative director

Indigenous interests: This slim Sagittarian has spent his entire life in Texas, graduating with a biology degree from Tarleton State University. He originally pursued a career in fashion but got disillusioned with the “fickle, cutthroat” retail industry. His lifelong interest in plants led him to his current job, working in a greenhouse. Unlike the fashion business, “plants only yield, and they don’t talk,” he quips.

Art and music: Tracie’s varied interests include creating portraits using recycled materials. “My work is mainly people’s faces and the stories behind them.” His music tastes veer toward rock/hip hop/soul (a fave is Nina Simone). Tracie also practices religious fasting twice a month.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition May 13, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Drawing Dallas: Mikael Andrews

Mikael Andrews considers a Pekingese his best friend, but is himself a great friend to the gay community

MARK STOKES | Illustrator
mark@markdrawsfunny.com

Name and age: Mikael Andrews, 49

Occupation: HIV/STD behavioral change counselor

Spotted: Walking his dog in East Dallas

Zodiac sign: Aries

Blue, but not blue: Mikael is a stand-out in any crowd with his trademark bright blue hair. This native North Texan (he grew up in Waxahachie) is a retired singer, dancer and baton twirler. He holds a bachelor’s degree in vocal performance and has taught dance on the university level. Performance opportunities allowed him to travel to 21 states, Canada, Mexico and Guatemala in his younger years.

Active and activism: Mikael has been involved in LGBT activism for more than 20 years on the local, state and national levels, and headed up his own fundraising foundation, Don’t Just Sit There Productions, from 1999 to 2001. He has held three titles in the gay male contest circuit, most notably as the first person to represent Oak Lawn at the 2000 Mr. Gay Texas All-American contest. The resulting involvement in various LGBT charities and benefits allowed him more travel opportunities and helped pave the way for his present occupation, work that he has been humbled and proud to be a part of for the past 10 years.

On the move: During his various travels, Mikael loved Toronto, Ontario, Quiche and Antigua, Guatemala, and San Francisco, where he dreams of settling someday. But when he isn’t working or traveling, Mikael enjoys cruising thrift shops. He also loves to eat, and enjoys dining at the many mom-and-pop restaurants in East Dallas. Mikael feels blessed to have wonderful friends and a very full and active life, but his greatest joy is hanging with his best buddy, Toby Dog, a 4-year-old Pekingese.

A dog’s life: Toby Dog belonged to one of Mikael’s dear friends, so when life circumstances changed for Toby Dog’s daddy, he asked Mikael to let the pooch come live with him. He truly is this man’s best friend.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Feb. 18, 2011.

—  John Wright