Anniversary • MALLITON-COVELL

MALLITON-COVELL  |  Local artist-photographer Marty Malliton and noted attorney Rebecca Covell of Dallas celebrated their 15th anniversary on Jan. 25. When they are not traveling, both are devoted to the community and the fight for LGBT equality.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition February 3, 2012.

—  Michael Stephens

Best Bets • 01.27.12

Best-BetsFriday 01.27

See more Seymour
It’s not enough that Jane Seymour is a famous actress and is fabulously beautiful, but she paints, too. Talk about winning the talent and genetic lottery. The former Bond girl and Emmy-award winner comes to Dallas to display her works and show the town what A-list really means.

DEETS:
Wisby-Smith Fine Art
500 Crescent Court, Ste. 146.
Through Sat. 6 p.m.
Wisby-Smth.com.

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Friday 01.27

Del-iver us from evil
Del Shores returns to Dallas for one more go-round of his Sordid Confessions. He goes for the jugular with stories about his life that are crass and comical. He’ll also be taping the shows for his DVD release of Confessions so that his rants on Southern Baptists, Hollywood and maybe even a teeny bit about his recent break-up will be preserved for all time.

DEETS:
The Rose Room (inside S4)
3911 Cedar Springs Road.
5 p.m. and 8 p.m. $10–$30.
DelShores.tix.com.

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Saturday 01.28

Bigger is always better
Cattle ranchers, oil men and love triangles all make for an epic story of Texas. The DTC celebrates its current show with the gala event Giant: The Celebration. You’ll feel truly Texan with the wine stroll, Texas food and live local music.

DEETS:
Wyly Theater
2401 Flora St. 6 p.m.
DallasTheaterCenter.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 27, 2012.

—  Kevin Thomas

TASTING NOTES: Central 214 gets a makeover

GrahamDodds_100There’s more than coffee brewing over at Central 214, the schmancy restaurant inside Kimpton’s Hotel Palomar and a frequent hang for the gay crowd.

Last fall, longtime exec chef Blythe Beck left unexpected. She was replaced last month with Graham Dodds, pictured, formerly of Oak Cliff’s popular Bolsa. Word came this week both of Dodds’ new menu and that the restaurant will undergo some other major changes this spring — though we don’t know what those are, other than Dodds calling them a “face-lift … that will marry the food and dining atmosphere.”

We do know that Dodds will be incorporating some of his Bolsa ideas into the new concept: Local farm suppliers, seasonal updates and drawing his inspiration from the availability of fresh ingredients. And it also looks to be a total makeover: Starters, entrees, desserts … even the bar menu. Among the additions: “Popcorn” sweetbreads (as an app!), blue cheese terrine and pear with honeycomb, crisp (!) gnocchi with the oxtail ragout, paprika-honey glazed lamb breast (interesting) with cannellini beans and a chocolate-cranberry pavlova.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 20, 2012.

—  Kevin Thomas

Legacy offering walk-in clinic year-round

From Staff Reports
editor@dallasvoice.com

Legacy Counseling Center experienced such success with the walk-in mental health/substance abuse clinic the center offered during the holidays, Legacy has decided to make the walk-in clinic a permanent addition to the center’s services, Executive Director Melissa Grove announced this week.

The counseling center is located in the Uptown area, on McKinney at Elizabeth Street. Walk-in hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays, and 9 a.m. to noon on Fridays.

Any HIV-positive person who comes to the clinic during those hours will be seen by a therapist and can start services immediately, Grove said. She added that it would be helpful if someone planning to access the clinic could call in advance to let center personnel know they are coming and what time they expect to be there.

Legacy accepts Medicaid, Medicare, Ryan White, Northstar and private insurance, while utilizing various community grants to cover the cost of counseling. But, Grove added, “No one will be turned away who needs our care.”

Legacy has been offering counseling services to HIV-positive individuals for more than 22 years, and has “highly experienced licensed therapists who are experts in dealing with mental health and substance abuse issues, and the unique challenges faced by those who are HIV-positive,” Grove said. The center offers individual, couples, group and family therapy and a variety of outpatient programs for those dealing with substance abuse issues. The center also offers psychiatric services to all its clients and free HIV testing twice a month.

The Legacy Counseling Center Crisis Line, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, is 214-207-3953.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 13, 2012.

—  Kevin Thomas

Best bets • 01.06.12

Friday 01.06

Harnessing a bargain
With the economy being such a bitch, you gotta find a good deal anywhere. That goes for leather masters and mistresses as well. New and used items go on the block at the Leather Silent Auction benefiting local groups. And if you can snag a harness, some paddles or a pair of boots for cheaper than usual, jump on it fast.

DEETS: Dallas Eagle, 5740 Maple Ave.  7–11 p.m. DallasEagle.com.

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Tuesday 01.10

Pecha what?
Pecha Kucha Dallas starts 2012 with the appropriately titled theme: A Clean Slate. A panel of speakers cover topics on helping build a new you.

OK, it sounds self-helpy, but PK’s structure keeps it tight and speakers cover a lot of ground in short time. So it’s short, sweet and ultra-fascinating. But ask them how you pronounce it.

DEETS: Texas Theatre 231 W. Jefferson Blvd.  7 p.m. $5–$10. PKNDallas.org.

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Thursday 01.12

He’s a magic man
We’ve seen David Blaine be buried alive, frozen and more, but what’s behind the man of magic? Blaine talks about what inspires his death-defying feats and hopefully he’ll throw in some tricks, too.

DEETS: Winspear Opera House, 2403 Flora St. 8 p.m. $20. ATTPAC.org.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 6, 2012.

—  Michael Stephens

Our gay Texas

Readers Voice Awards’ ‘Gay Texas’ photo contest entries show great talent

RUNNERS-UP |  Among the contenders for Dallas Voice’s My Gay Texas photo contest that did not make the top nine are, clockwise from above: Eric Dickson (cowboy), Lauren Farris (‘Drag Queens’), Stephanie Kern (Rainbow Lounge rally flag), Don Klausmeyer (man in leaves), Farris again (drag queen) and Shannon Kern (Milk Day rainbow flag).

RUNNERS-UP | Among the contenders for Dallas Voice’s My Gay Texas photo contest that did not make the top nine are, clockwise from above: Eric Dickson (cowboy), Lauren Farris (‘Drag Queens’), Stephanie Kern (Rainbow Lounge rally flag), Stephen Masker (man in leaves), Farris again (drag queen) and Shannon Kern (Milk Day rainbow flag).

The Dallas Voice’s Readers Voice Awards are underway (you can vote online right now, at DFWReadersVoice.com), where you can vote on your favorite whatevers — criminal attorney, chef, boutique, dog walker or get-laid travel vacation. (Trust us, we’ve tried to think of everything.)

But what you also get to vote for — and stand a chance of winning — is the My Gay Texas photo contest. We had scores of submissions during the month of December, asking photographers professional and amateur to submit the pictures that defined, for them, what’s great or interesting or special or unique or beautiful or sexy or hilarious about queer Texas. The top nine are on the site, and you can vote for your favorite and be entered to win two round-trip tickets on American Airlines to the lower 48, Mexico, Caribbean and Canada. And by voting, you also get to benefit the photographer’s charity of choice to the tune of a thousand simoleons.

But the nine photos that made the cut only tell part of the story. Tons of photos were in serious contention but just didn’t hit the top tier. Here are some that really speak to the diversity and fascination of our gay community … and the talent of our readers. With these the runners-up, you know the competition was fierce.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 6, 2012.

—  Michael Stephens

The good, the bad & the ‘A-List’

These arts, cultural & sports stories defined gay Dallas in 2011

FASHIONS AND FORWARD  |  The Jean Paul Gaultier exhibit at the DMA, above, was a highlight of the arts scene in 2011, while Dirk Nowitzki’s performance in the NBA playoffs gave the Mavs their first-ever — and much deserved — world title. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

FASHIONS AND FORWARD | The Jean Paul Gaultier exhibit at the DMA, above, was a highlight of the arts scene in 2011, while Dirk Nowitzki’s performance in the NBA playoffs gave the Mavs their first-ever — and much deserved — world title. (Arnold Wayne Jones/Dallas Voice)

A lot of eyes were focused on Dallas nationally in 2011 — for good and bad — but much of what made the city a fun place last year has specific queer appeal. CULTURE The rise of the reality TV star. 2011 was the year Dallas made a big splash across everyone’s television sets — and it had nothing to do with who shot J.R. (although that’s pending). From the culinary to the conniving, queer Dallasites were big on the small screen. On the positive side were generally good portrayals of gay Texans. Leslie Ezelle almost made it all the way in The Next Design Star, while The Cake Guys’ Chad Fitzgerald is still in contention on TLC’s The Next Great Baker. Lewisville’s Ben Starr was a standout on MasterChef. On the web, Andy Stark, Debbie Forth and Brent Paxton made strides with Internet shows Bear It All, LezBeProud and The Dallas Life,respectively.

‘A’ to Z  |  ‘The A-LIst: Dallas,’ above, had its detractors, but some reality TV stars from Big D, like Chad Fitzgerald, Leslie Ezelle and Ben Starr, represented us well.

‘A’ to Z | ‘The A-LIst: Dallas,’ above, had its detractors, but some reality TV stars from Big D, like Chad Fitzgerald, Leslie Ezelle and Ben Starr, represented us well.

There were downsides, though. Drew Ginsburg served as the token gay on Bravo’s teeth-clenching Most Eligible: Dallas, and the women on Big Rich Texas seemed a bit clichéd. But none were more polarizing than the cast of Logo’s The A-List: Dallas. Whether people loved or hated it, the six 20somethings (five gays, one girl) reflected stereotypes that made people cringe. Gaultier makes Dallas his runway. The Dallas Museum of Art scored a coup, thanks to couture. The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk not only featured the work of the famed designer, but was presented the designs in an innovative manner. Nothing about it was stuffy. Seeing his iconic designs in person is almost a religious experience — especially when its Madonna’s cone bra. Gaultier reminded us that art is more than paintings on a wall. (A close runner-up: The Caravaggio exhibit in Fort Worth.) The Return of Razzle Dazzle. ­­There was speculation whether Razzle Dazzle could actually renew itself after a near-decade lull, but the five-day spectacular was a hallmark during National Pride Month in June, organized by the Cedar Springs Merchant Association. The event started slowly with the wine walk but ramped up to the main event street party headlined by rapper Cazwell. Folding in the MetroBall with Deborah Cox, the dazzle had returned with high-profile entertainment and more than 10,000 in attendance on the final night. A Gathering pulled it together. TITAS executive director Charles Santos took on the daunting task of producing A Gathering, a collective of area performance arts companies, commemorating 30 years of AIDS. Groups such as the Dallas Opera, Turtle Creek Chorale and Dallas Theater Center donated their time for this one-of-a-kind show with all proceeds benefiting Dallas’ leading AIDS services organizations. And it was worth it. A stirring night of song, dance and art culminated in an approximate 1,000 in attendance and $60,000 raised for local charities. Bravo, indeed. The Bronx closed after 35 years. Cedar Springs isn’t short on its institutions, but when it lost The Bronx, the gayborhood felt a real loss. For more than three decades, the restaurant was home to many Sunday brunches and date nights in the community. We were introduced to Stephan Pyles there, and ultimately, we just always figured on it being there as part of the fabric of the Strip. A sister company to the neighboring Warwick Melrose bought the property with rumors of expansion. But as yet, the restaurant stands steadfast in its place as a reminder of all those memories that happened within its walls and on its plates.  The Omni changed the Dallas skyline. In November, The Omni Dallas hotel opened the doors to its 23-story structure and waited to fill it’s 1,000 rooms to Dallas visitors and staycationers. Connected to the Dallas Convention Center, the ultra-modern hotel is expected to increase the city’s convention business which has the Dallas Visitors and Conventions Bureau salivating — as they should. The hotel brought modern flair to a booming Downtown and inside was no different. With quality eateries and a healthy collection of art, including some by gay artists Cathey Miller and Ted Kincaid, the Omni quickly became a go-to spot for those even from Dallas. SPORTS The Super Bowl came to town. Although seeing the Cowboys make Super Bowl XLV would have been nice for locals, the event itself caused a major stir, both good and bad. Ticketing issues caused a commotion with some disgruntled buyers and Jerry Jones got a bad rap for some disorganization surrounding the game. But the world’s eyes were on North Texas as not only the game was of a galactic measure, but the celebs were too. From Kardashians to Ke$ha to Kevin Costner, parties and concerts flooded the city and the streets. The gays even got in on the action. Despite crummy weather, the Super Street Party was billed as the “world’s first ever gay Super Bowl party.” The ice and snow had cleared out and the gays came out, (and went back in to the warmer clubs) to get their football on. The XLV Party at the Cotton Bowl included a misguided gay night with acts such as Village People, Lady Bunny and Cazwell that was ultimately canceled. The Mavericks won big. The Mavs are like the boyfriend you can’t let go of because you see how much potential there is despite his shortcomings. After making the playoffs with some just-misses, the team pulled through to win against championship rivals, Miami Heat, who beat them in 2006. In June, the team cooled the Heat in six games, taking home its first NBA Championship, with Dirk Nowitzki appropriately being named MVP. The Rangers gave us faith. Pro sports ruled big in these parts. The Mavericks got us in the mood for championships and the Texas Rangers almost pulled off a victory in the World Series. With a strong and consistent showing for the season, the Rangers went on to defend their AL West Division pennant. Hopes were high as they handily defeated the Detroit Tigers in game six, but lost the in the seventh game. Although it was a crushing loss, the Texas Rangers proved why we need to stand by our men.

— Rich Lopez

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 6, 2012.

—  Michael Stephens

Feedback • 12.23.11

Senior housing in Houston

I am very interested in this article as I have been dealing with some of these issues here in Houston.  As a 75-year-old gay male who lost a partner to AIDS back in 1995, and then lost my business in 2004, I have had great difficulty in surviving.  Only recently, through the help of some fellow gay seniors, I was able to move into the Allen Parkway Village, run by the Houston Housing Authority.  I have a quite comfortable small apartment, with my faithful basset hound, for a very low rent with all bills included. I contacted thutpublisher of a local gay magazine, OutSmart, suggesting they do an article on this resource for seniors, but never received a response.  And a few years ago I attended a weekly support group called SPRY at the Montrose Counseling Center  and curiously this resource for living was never mentioned.

Larry Lingle, Houston

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Gay marriage: Healthy and easy

My husband and I recently discovered how relatively easy it is to get married in New York. After doing our online application, once we got to the City Clerk office, we were married within three hours, including time to go across the street to get a judicial waiver for the 24-hour waiting period. EVERYONE was very helpful and they obviously think it’s really cool that people come from all over the country to get married there. The Officiant in the City Clerk Office was very professional.

Stan Guy, , via Instant tea

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TO SEND A LETTER  |  We welcome letters from readers. Shorter letters and those addressing a single issue are more likely to be printed. Letters are subject to editing for length and clarity, but we attempt to maintain the writer’s substance and tone. Include  your home address and a daytime telephone number for verification. Send letters to the senior editor, preferably by e-mail (nash@dallasvoice.com). Letters also may be faxed (214-969-7271) or sent via the U.S. Postal Service (Dallas Voice, 4145 Travis St., Third Floor, Dallas TX 75204). All letters become the property of Dallas Voice.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 23, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Best bets • 12.16.11

Friday 12.16

This is a journey into solstice
The annual Winter SolstiCelebration has gotten so big, it’s now spread across two days. In its 19th year, the event uses music, dance, ceremony and more to observe the Winter Solstice. And don’t forget the Yule Fest. Canned food and winterwear donations are encouraged.

DEETS: Cathedral of Hope, 5910 Cedar Springs Road. 7 p.m. Through Saturday. $15. EarthRhythms.org.

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Saturday 12.17

Techie buzz art
Out Dallas-based artist R. Mateo Diago puts his vision on display in the new exhibit every then … and now in which he intergrates the iPhone’s capabilities into helping create his art. We might be able to take rad photos with apps like Instagram, but Diago uses it as a statement of people’s compulsion. Cool, right?

DEETS: Ro2 Art Downtown, 110 N. Akard St. Opening reception at 7 p.m. Through Jan. 28. Ro2Art.com

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Wednesday 12.21

On writing ‘Well’
Author Gregory G. Allen returns to Dallas from New York to sign his new book Well With My Soul about two brothers, one gay, coming to terms with each other. It even garnered a Lambda Literary nomination. Welcome home, sir.

DEETS: Krimson & Klover, 3111 Cole Ave., Ste 101. 5–7 p.m. GGAllen.net.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 16, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Pride proceeds


CHECK DISTRIBUTION  | 
Representatives of the five organizations named as beneficiaries of the 2011 Alan Ross Texas Freedom Parade gather at the Round-Up Saloon to pick up checks representing their share of proceeds from the Pride parade. Dallas Tavern Guild, which puts on the parade each year, distributed checks totaling $18,700 during the guild’s monthly meeting on Thursday, Dec. 1, with each beneficiary’s share determined by the number of shifts each group’s volunteers worked during the parade and Festival in Lee Park in September. AIDS Interfaith Network received $4,300; AIDS Arms received $3,400; AIDS Services Dallas received $2,400; Legacy Counseling Center received $1,100 and Youth First Texas received $7,500. Beneficiaries are in the front row. Tavern Guild members are behind them. (David Taffet/Dallas Voice)

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 9, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens