Master of HIS domain

Ben Starr, the recently out Dallas cheftestant on Fox’s ‘MasterChef,’ camps it up on Gordon Ramsay’s cooking competition series

ARNOLD WAYNE JONES  | Life+Style Editor
jones@dallasvoice.com

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MASTERCHEF
Airs Tuesdays on Fox (Ch. 4) at 8 p.m.

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When Lewisville-based travel writer Ben Starr auditioned for Fox’s MasterChef, he doubted they’d be interested in his style of home cooking. But not only did he make the cut, he’s been one of the more memorable cheftestants — just this week, he had the judge’s favorite dish.

The series is only halfway through, but for Starr, it’s already made a huge difference in his life: It forced him to come out to his parents just last month. We talked to him about the experience and his favorite meals.

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You’ve been struggling since you wowed the judges at your audition. The audition kinda set me up to expect that I would do well in the competition, but we spun pretty quickly into an emphasis on gourmet cuisine, which is not my thing at all. My street tacos were a little bit spiffy, and I am extremely well traveled, but I tend to eat peasant food even when I travel. I was seeing all these people around me making restaurant quality cuisine and trying to compete on their level. Nice to make a good ol’ catfish in a skillet.

What was the hardest challenge for you? The biggest challenge has definitely been psychological. I’m competitive by nature and I want to feel like I’m competition, but I was surrounded by chefs that were a little more connected to the Food Network that I am. They’d use words like umami [a Japanese word for a savory flavor] and I had to go look it up. There was a common lexicon among the contestants about what these famous chefs I’ve never heard of are doing in their restaurants. I felt like an idiot stumbling around in the dark. That started to leak into my cooking and I began to question, “Is this sophisticated enough? Is this even sophisticated?” The episode this week was a turning point. I felt like for the first time I’m back in my own element.

You certainly have made an impression with your outfits. I don’t wear those hats at home, though I do wear an apron, just for practicality. But [the show] has started this storytelling legacy — people expect me to wear them when they come over. My mom made me the pumpkin hat and apron. Actually, she made me five or six pairs to wear. That’s why you always see a different one on me each episode. I was going through them.

Was wearing them part of a conscious effort to stand during the auditions? I am fairly myself, though I had to set myself apart that wasn’t just about food. I needed to be someone [the judges] remember when they go home at night. That’s why I talked about my rural upbringing, because I thought it would generate a memory.

Had you watched the show before? Did you know what to expect? I don’t watch much TV, but this is not my first time being on TV, which is ironic because I abhor reality television —it brings out the worst in our culture. But I did Rachael Ray’s So You Think You Can Cook in 2007. The audience there was much more caring and nurturing than the machine on MasterChef, but I was a little bit prepared for the frank judgment.

I did not watch the first season of MasterChef, but my friend Karen Rutherford said, “I’ll never speak to you again if you don’t audition [for season 2].” So I watched them all on Hulu. I just sweated my way through them. I knew how intense and stressful it is to cook on TV, and saw how brutal Joe Bastianich and Gordon Ramsay were with the contestants. I thought: Screw this. Then a few weeks passed and the terror faded [and I went through the lengthy audition process]. It was a lot of work — the most difficult full-time job I’ve ever had that doesn’t pay.

What’s your favorite kind of cuisine? While my DNA wants to say Mexican food — I had it in the womb six times a week — I am most intrigued by Thai food. It is so complex, yet so much of it is cooked on the street in a tiny little cart. From the richest to the poorest, everybody eats on the street.

How about a favorite meal? One of the most memorable meals I’ve ever had was in Egypt on New Year’s Eve in 2001. I spent it on Mount Sinai and hiked eight miles back down to the car for the drive back to our resort. [The driver] fell asleep at the wheel and we plummeted into a canyon. Eventually a camel train of Bedouins came by the bottom of this canyon. They took us onto the camels and rode four or five miles to their camp. All the women came out, killed a goat and started cooking while the men tried to pull our car out of the canyon.

It was a humble meal — just a goat stew and some flat bread — but the flavors were really intense and felt they came right out of the desert. I could not even communicate with these people who live in abject poverty, but still they were willing to kill one of their last goats and throw a big feast for us because it’s in their nature to be hospitable. I realized it was important to me to use food to nurture people in my life — I could never be a chef and be in the back. I need to be with the people. My partner is one of the main reasons I cook — we’ve been together eight years and I want to marry him one day.

Did you plan to be “the gay guy” on the show? When I was on [Rachael Ray] it was not addressed and I didn’t talk about it openly. At that point my family didn’t know I was gay — in fact, I didn’t come out to my parents until about five weeks ago. They were totally shell-shocked — they didn’t have a clue.

Maybe mom should have guessed since she made you all those hats. Ha! Maybe.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition July 8, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

On Martin Luther King Day, words on equality from his widow

In honor of Martin Luther King day, I thought I’d share some quotes regarding equality and how it relates to our community from his late wife, Coretta Scott King. As the torch bearer who continued the march for equality in the beloved community, she remains a brilliant hero for us.

“I still hear people say that I should not be talking about the rights of lesbian and gay people and I should stick to the issue of racial justice… But I hasten to remind them that Martin Luther King, Jr., said, ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere’ … I appeal to everyone who believes in Martin Luther King, Jr.’s dream to make room at the table of brotherhood and sisterhood for lesbian and gay people.”1

“Gay and lesbian people have families, and their families should have legal protection, whether by marriage or civil union. A constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriages is a form of gay bashing, and it would do nothing at all to protect traditional marriages.”2

and I love this one:

“Gays and lesbians stood up for civil rights in Montgomery, Selma, in Albany, Georgia, and St. Augustine, Florida, and many other campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement. Many of these courageous men and women were fighting for my freedom at a time when they could find few voices for their own, and I salute their contributions.”4

God bless the memory and work towards “the beloved community” by Martin Luther King, and his wonderful wife, Coretta Scott King.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  admin

Peter LaBarbera’s most revelatory four words

Private gay relationships are fine — “at least right now”:

( click to play audio clip)

And what would Peter’s tomorrow look like? We’d certainly love to hear the desired endgame, not just from Peter, but from every “pro-family” person who’s working day and night for something.

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*SEE ALSO:



Anti-Gay Chicago Groups Make ‘Hate List’: MyFoxCHICAGO.com




Good As You

—  admin

In other words: Future conservative primary challengers will have to answer why they’re in bed with an SPLC-designated hate group

FRC Action PAC Pledges to Support Conservative Primary Challengers to Any U.S. Senator Voting to Overturn ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ During Lame-Duck Session

December 17, 2010

WASHINGTON, D.C. – FRC Action PAC, the political action committee connected with FRC Action, the lobbying arm of the Family Research Council, announced today that it will endorse and fund conservative primary challengers to any U.S. Senator who votes to overturn “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” during the lame-duck session.

FRC Action PAC President Connie Mackey made the following comments:

“We are pledging today to endorse, and help fund, conservative primary challengers to any U.S. Senator who votes during the lame-duck session to overturn ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.’ FRC Action PAC will work to remove any U.S. Senator who would place liberal special interests ahead of the priorities of the American people.

“The U.S. Senate has twice rejected the overturn of ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell.’ Despite this, Majority Leader Harry Reid continues with his obsession while failing to address the essential responsibilities of the federal government. As three of the four service chiefs have made clear, the men and women of the Armed Forces who are engaged in fighting two wars should not be distracted by Congress using them to advance a liberal social agenda. Using the Senate’s time in the lame-duck session to pay back his liberal political base is simply absurd and demonstrates once again Senator Reid’s misplaced priorities. Members of the Senate should refuse to become accomplices in helping Harry Reid advance his agenda over the American people’s agenda,” concluded Mackey. [Press Release Source]

2 out of 3 Americans support DADT repeal.

Game = on.




Good As You

—  admin

New Lesbian Project for L Word’s Chaiken

Ilene Chaiken X390 (GETTY) | ADVOCATE.COMThere’s life after The L Word — Ilene Chaiken, the creator of the
fictional series and its reality spin-off, is developing a scripted
show for CBS about a lesbian doctor.
Advocate.com: Daily News

—  admin

Kleefisch Apologizes for Antigay Words

REBECCA KLEEFISCH X390Rebecca Kleefisch, a candidate for lieutenant governor in Wisconsin,
apologized Thursday after she said expanding partnership rights to gay
couples would lead to people wanting to marry animals and objects.
Advocate.com: Daily News

—  admin

‘Our intent is to swamp them out’: The first words of one extremely biased baby

Because of the weak (and much-criticized) defense that they helped shape in the Prop 8 federal trial, the Alliance Defense Fund and its allied litigators are heavily in the news these days. But how did this conservative Christian legal organization even get its start? What helped the flawed talking points achieve liftoff? Who filled the kitty that’d go on to claw at equality’s eyes?

Well like so many conservative right side-thorns, talk radio is at root of this equality-hostile petunia:

12/12/1993, The Associated Press

201008231613

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**NOTE: This is the same “Point of View” radio show that we post about from time to time. The one where co-host Penna Dexter recently blamed a slain 15-year-old gay boy for assisting in his own shooting death




Good As You

—  John Wright