“Confessions of a Mormon Boy” at Theater LaB

Steven Fales

Steven Fales

Steven Fales (ironically pronounced “fails”) was born Mormon, sixth generation in fact, what he calls “Mormon DNA.” As a good Mormon boy he grew up, became a missionary, went to Brigham Young University, got married and had kids. The only problem being that Fales is gay. After a failed attempt at “reparative therapy” he was kicked out of the Mormon church, got divorced, moved to New York, became a prostitute and developed a crystal meth problem. If the story ended there Fales would be like any number of queer people injured by their intolerant upbringing and lost to a world only too willing to offer alternatives to healing, but the story didn’t end there. Fales, a trained actor, got his life together and started doing a stand-up comedy routine that eventually became his hit one-man play Confessions of a Mormon Boy.

More than just another tear-jerking coming out story, Confessions of a Mormon Boy connects the behaviors learned by growing up in an environment that tells people they will never be worthy of God’s love with the allure of chemical abuse. The play mixes pathos and tragedy with a very healthy dose of comedy (and it doesn’t hurt that former call-boy Fales is quite easy on the eyes).  Fales has written a story not just for the LGBT community, but also for the Mormon community of his youth (it’s played four times in Salt Lake City). For a play about prostitution and drug addiction Confessions of a Mormon Boy is neigh-on family friendly, containing no nudity or cursing.

Fales performs Confessions of a Mormon Boy at Theater LaB (1706 Alamo) Feb. 8-12. Tickets start at $25 and may be purchased by calling 713-868-7516.

After the jump watch Fales perform the opening monologue:

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Video: Steele wants to keep job, hopes gays’ wedding rings make worthy deposit

We’ve already shown you clips of National Organization for Marriage chair Maggie Gallagher talking to five RNC chairperson hopefuls about marriage, specifically the subject of shutting gays out of the system. And all five of those hopefuls, running to the right of current RNC chair Michael Steele, told Maggie exactly what she wanted to hear: Ban the gays, smile so you don’t seem cruel doing it, sleep well knowing you’ve “protected families” (and small tents) for another few years.

Well now it’s current chairman Michael Steele’s turn in the hot seat, except this time Maggie passes the duty on to her NOM colleague Frank Cannon. And as for Steele? Well, he proudly puts on his his staunch conservative mask and draws a clear line in the sand between the GOP’s changing tide and the GOP’s old wave, showing once again why no equality advocate can in good conscience place sincere hope for fair, civil rights gains in this current (or, seemingly, future) incarnation of the GOP:

Hey Michael Steele: Saying something is not exclusionary doesn’t make it so.

*EARLIER: Maggie talks to hopeful Ann Wagner

Maggie talks to hopefuls Saul Anuzis, Gentry Collins, and Reince Priebus




Good As You

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