WATCH: Wub, the gayest dance ever

WubThis video begins with a very attractive young man talking about police harassment. Why can’t he just dance in public, without being hassled by The Man? And then he demonstrates the controversial dance that got him and his cohorts arrested in the first place.

True arts movement or put-on? Do you really care? I don’t (though I expect the latter). It’s just a video of hot young men in Spandex playing with giant phalluses.

Best part? Mom watching in the background.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

‘The Variants’ launches third season

The Variants, the online web series shot here in Dallas and set in a gay-owned comic bookstore, launched its third season today. The entire series was funded via the producers’ Kickstarter.com campaign. It’ll run for 10 weeks. The premiere ep, “Zeus Comics Worldwide,” deals with Kelli’s hesitance to turn the store into an expanded brand, losing its homey quality. You can watch it here, or just click below.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

WATCH: Dallas Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson records LGBT Pride Month message

U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Dallas, pledged her continued support for equality in an LGBT Pride Month video.

The video was posted on the congresswoman’s YouTube page Friday.

A longtime supporter of LGBT rights, Johnson voted in favor of the anti-gay Defense of Marriage Act in 1996 but now is now a sponsor of the bill to repeal DOMA.

In the video, she mentions that this year is the 43rd  anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion, reflecting on the “enormous advancements in gay rights” since then that include the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell” and the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act.

“These laws strengthen our commitment to value every American’s life equally, both publicly and privately,” she said. “The law of the land must protest every American’s civil rights.”

Johnson pledges in the video to continue to support gay rights as a member of LGBT Equality Caucus and to help pass legislation that “ensures a more united fight against discrimination and intolerance.”

“While great progress has been made, more work needs to be done,” she said.

Watch the video below.

—  Anna Waugh

EXCLUSIVE: Amarillo rapper Adair Lion reflects on the 3 days since his ‘Gay is Okay’ went viral

It's easy to see why some might suspect — or hope — that Lion is gay himself. He's not, but he said some of the hateful comments he's received in response to the video have helped him to understand what life might be like if he were.

“It’s been phenomenal.”

That’s how Amarillo-based rapper and straight ally Adair Lion described the last three days, since his new video “Gay is Okay” exploded on YouTube and beyond.

“I did figure on a large reaction,” Lion told Instant Tea on Friday. “It’s cool to see the YouTube bar on the video be green [indicating likes].”

But while everyone from the Huffington Post to Perez Hilton has posted the video, underground sites that have shown his previous work aren’t touching this one. These are the sites that he felt had his back. Now, he said, they’ve shied away.

—  Rich Lopez

“The Variants” ends season with a little skin

This season of The Variants ends with this quasi-cliffhanger as an investor looks into the viability of the store “going national” with its current staff. Plus, Richard takes his clothes off. And Vlad speaks! Take a gander after the jump.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

WATCH: Gallavin’s “My Baby Just Cares for Me”

Out jazz singer Gallavin has released his second single and video, a cover of Nina Simone’s classic “My Baby Just Cares for Me.” He’s keeping his buzz afloat as this single comes off Gallavin’s recent RightOut TV nomination for his first video, “Mad About the Boy” in the folk/roots/jazz category (the award went to Brett Every’s “Prince Charming.”). He posted “My Baby” Sunday on YouTube.

Gallavin turns up the pop sensibilities on the track but I’m still figuring out the video. Overall, it’s a romp through the streets celebrating romance, but the domestic abuse drag queen bit kind of stretches. Perhaps you can only do so much in just under three minutes. Otherwise, Gallavin has a commanding voice with personality to spare and pulls the song off ably and ultimately, the video resolves with relatively sweet charm.

Check it after the jump.

—  Rich Lopez

Ray Hill kicks off campaign for Texas House with YouTube videos

Ray Hill

Ray Hill

As previously reported by Houstini Ray Hill, the iconic and iconoclastic Houston LGBT activist, announced this year that he would challenge ten-term incumbent state representative Garnet Coleman in next spring’s Democratic Primary. Hill is running what he calls an “unfunded campaign,” relying on social media and support from community members to get his message out.

We haven’t heard much about the campaign since Hill filed at the beginning of the month (perhaps he’s been distracted by his recent arrest during an attempt to prevent the HPD vice squad from harassing strippers), but Hill seems to have gotten back into the campaign saddle, releasing two YouTube videos about his campaign and why he thinks he’s the best choice to represent district 147 (they can be viewed after the jump). The audio’s not the best (tip: taping next to a roaring waterfall does not produce the best sound), but in both videos Hill expresses his belief that the common people of the district will vote him into office. Judge for yourself:

—  admin

Top 10: Perry presidential bid galvanized gays

clip-Strong-Perry

BROKEBACK PERRY | Rick Perry’s ‘Strong’ ad, in which he’s wearing a jacket similar to the one worn by Heath Ledger in ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ has the second-most dislikes of any video on YouTube.

No: 3

Rick Perry began 2011 being sworn in to a third four-year term as Texas’ governor. He ends it on a bus tour of Iowa, where he’s trying frantically to climb back into contention for the GOP presidential nomination as the Hawkeye State’s Jan. 3 caucuses near.

Perry is perhaps the most anti-gay governor in Texas history — and that’s saying something. So, when rumors began to swirl this spring that “Governor Goodhair” was planning to run for president, the LGBT community seemed to collectively grimace. For most, the downside of Perry holding national office would far outweigh one small consolation: At least he would finally have to depart the Lone Star State.

Longstanding rumors that Perry is a closeted homosexual quickly resurfaced. And, as if to try to put an end to them once and for all, Perry organized a “day of prayer” at Reliant Stadium in Houston, called The Response and funded by the American Family Association. The AFA is considered an anti-gay hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, and those who signed on as endorsers of Perry’s prayer rally certainly had the views to back up the designation.

The Response drew a huge response from, among others, the LGBT community, with activists staging counterdemonstrations in H-Town during a sweltering first weekend of August. Perry insisted The Response wasn’t political, but a week later he announced his campaign for president.

Republicans were smitten, and Perry skyrocketed to the top of GOP presidential polls — positioning himself as a highly-sought-after, more conservative alternative to presumptive frontrunner Mitt Romney.

Just before he formally launched his presidential bid, Perry stated at an event in Colorado that he believed marriage is a state’s rights issue and New York’s decision to legalize same-sex marriage was “fine with me.”

Under intense pressure from social conservatives, he quickly retracted the statement and came out firmly in support of a federal marriage amendment.

But that didn’t stop Rob Schlein, then president of Log Cabin Republicans of Dallas, from writing a controversial column in which he said he would vote for Perry over President Barack Obama, despite the governor’s anti-gay record. The column was one of several factors that led National Log Cabin to de-charter the Dallas chapter, which is now known as Metroplex Republicans.

Perry would go on to sign a pledge from the anti-gay National Organization for Marriage and come out against the repeal of “don’t ask don’t tell.” But in the end, it appears his right-wing credentials weren’t enough to overcome major, repeated gaffes during nationally televised debates this fall.

In the most memorable one, Perry forgot the third federal department he would eliminate as president in what has become known as his “oops” moment.

Desperate to recover from the gaffes, Perry’s campaign lurched even further to the right — releasing a campaign ad called “Strong” in which he declared: “I’m not ashamed to admit that I’m a Christian, but you don’t need to be in the pew every Sunday to know there’s something wrong in this country when gays can serve openly in the military but our kids can’t openly celebrate Christmas or pray in school.”

“Strong” spawned many parodies, with some harping on the fact that Perry’s jacket in the ad resembled the one worn by Heath Ledger in Brokeback Mountain. “Strong” also garnered the second-most dislikes of any video on YouTube. Above all, though, where it really counts among Republican voters, the ad didn’t work.

As of this week, Perry was polling fifth in Iowa — and second among candidates from Texas behind Congressman Ron Paul.

— John Wright

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 30, 2011.

—  Kevin Thomas

Almost everyone dislikes Perry’s anti-gay ad

Thanks to efforts on social media and elsewhere, Gov. Rick Perry’s anti-gay Iowa TV ad now has 42 times as many Dislikes (67,329) as Likes (1,607) on YouTube. Ninety-eight percent of those who’ve rated the video have disliked it, compared to 2 percent who’ve liked it. Dislike the ad if you haven’t already by going here. You can also report it as offensive by clicking on the Flag button. Under “Select a Reason,” go to “Hateful or Abusive Content” and then “Promotes Hatred or Violence.” YouTube will ask you to indicate what the hate speech is about, and you can select “Sexual Orientation.” You can even add your own comments!

—  John Wright

YouTube celebrates National Coming Out Day

Kinda digging YouTube’s efforts at recognizing today as National Coming Out Day. They’ve created a playlist of videos by LGBT bands and artists that is rather impressive. Instead of going with the obvious, they featured an eclectic selection of groups like Xiu XiuHidden Cameras and San Antonio band Girl in a Coma. From YouTube:

In honor of National Coming Out Day, we celebrate bands who make great music…and who also happen to have gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender members. Vive la difference!

Right on! Now finish your day out with the playlist starting with this.

—  Rich Lopez