As U.S. Supreme Court prepares for marriage hearing, Mexico’s strikes down marriage bans

Posted on 20 Apr 2015 at 11:20am

Mexican Supreme Court chamber

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to hear the case for marriage equality, La Supreme Corte de Justicia de la Nation — the Mexican Supreme Court — struck down laws in that country banning same-sex marriage on April 15.

Here’s a translation of a portion of the decision from the Mexican Supreme Court’s website:

“Thus the reason why same-sex couples have not enjoyed the same protections as heterosexual couples is not careless of the legislature, but by the legacy of severe prejudices that have traditionally existed against him. The absence of the benefits that the law attaches to the institution of marriage is a direct consequence of prolonged discrimination that has existed for homosexual couples because of their sexual preference.”

Meanwhile, final briefs are due at the U.S. Supreme Court for the case that will be heard on April 28. The latest brief filed is by the former U.S. military officials, who wrote discrimination hurts military preparedness and is unfair to same-sex military couples that can’t choose where to live.

“Those willing to risk their lives for the security of their country should never be forced to risk losing the protections of marriage and the attendant rights of parenthood simply because their service obligations require them to move to states that refuse to recognize their marriages,” the brief says.

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