Travel Diary • 01.13.12

IMG_3636Gay Days, which for years has organized circuit-party- like festivities during the week-long “Gay Day” in Orlando — covering DisneyWorld, the Universal Parks and more — is expanding west for what they are calling their first “bi-coastal” celebration.

Only the new city isn’t really on the coast, or anywhere near it. Their bad.

Still, Gay Days Las Vegas does bring the signature event style to the Pacific time zone.

From Sept. 4–10 this year, the Tropicana Casino in Vegas will be host to the Pride party, which will include a travel-retail expo (free and open to the public), daily pool parties and other events around town (pictured).

That follows the annual Orlando blow-out, which takes place as always the first weekend in June. You can book reservations and learn more about both at GayDays.com.

Asian markets are organizing to embrace their LGBT travelers more openly.

Following a symposium late last year in New Delhi, sponsored by San Francisco-based Community Marketing, countries across the region discussed reaching out to gay travelers. The New York office of the Thailand tourism bureau even announced a pilot campaign, scheduled to launch during the first quarter of 2012, called “Go Thai, Be Free,” targeting LGBT travelers on the East Coast of the U.S.

Olivia, the lesbian-focused travel company, will celebrate its upcoming 40th anniversary with two special cruises — the largest lesbian cruises yet to set sail.

The cruises — departing from Fort Lauderdale on Jan. 27 and again on Feb. 3 on Holland America’s Nieuw Amsterdam liner, for a tour of the Caribbean, including Aruba, the Bahamas and Curacao — will hold 2,100 guests. To book a room or for further information, visit Olivia.com.

— Arnold Wayne Jones

—  Kevin Thomas

Anable applying for top spot at HRC

Fairness Fort Worth president knows he is new to the activism game, but says there is no denying his passion for the work

Anable-vertical-1-col

Tom Anable

Tammye Nash  |  Senior Editor
nash@dallasvoice.com

FORT WORTH  — As 2010 came to an end a year ago, longtime CPA and newly minted gay rights activist Tom Anable came to a momentous decision: He decided to sell his accounting business and spend the next year focusing on activism full time.

Now that year is over, and Anable has made another decision that could change his life again: He is applying for the top position at the Human Rights Campaign.

When HRC President Joe Solmonese announced that he was resigning, effective March 2012, Anable said, “My first thought was, ‘I pity the fool who has to try and fill those shoes.’ Now, three months later, I have started the process to apply myself.”

Anable said Thursday afternoon, Jan. 5, that he had sent his resume to the executive recruiting firm hired by HRC to help in the hiring process. Within 30 minutes, he said, he had been called for an in-depth phone interview, after which he was told his resume is being forwarded to the HRC search committee for review.

“I passed step one. Next step will be early February,” Anable said.
For most of his adult life, Anable said, he had focused his attention on his work. He knew he was gay, but he avoided the political and activist side of the LGBT community completely. Then came June 29, 2009, the night that agents with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission and officers with Fort Worth Police Department raided the Rainbow Lounge on the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots.

As the accountant for Rainbow Lounge, Anable was in the bar the night of the raid, checking receipts. What he saw that night left him shaken and scared — and angry. Within days, Anable had stepped across the line into activism and was helping create a new organization, Fairness Fort Worth, that has since helped revitalize the LGBT community in Tarrant County. And Anable spent the last year as Fairness Fort Worth president.

“It’s been a wild 2 ½ years,” Anable said this week.

Anable said that he first began considering applying for the position of HRC president in mid-December after discussions with some HRC board members while he was in Washington, D.C. for meetings.

“They told me I should apply. At first, I thought, no way. But when I read the job description, I realized, hey, I actually am qualified for this job. I actually do meet the qualifications in this job description,” he said.

When he came back home to Fort Worth and discussed the possibility with friends here, Anable said, he got nothing but encouragement in return: “Carol West, Jon Nelson, [Fort Worth Police] Chief Halstead — they all said I should apply.”

Still, Anable said, “It took me at least a week to wrap my head around the idea, to decide whether this is something I really want to do,” he said. “I did a lot of soul-searching about this. It was a very sobering moment for me, an unbelievable moment for me personally, to realize that in just 2 ½ years I have gone from being just a CPA to being an activist and president of Fairness Fort Worth, to the point where I actually feel qualified enough to even think about applying to HRC.”

Anable readily acknowledges that he is very new to the world of activism and nonprofit management, and he acknowledges that he “may not be what they are looking for” when it comes to the HRC presidency.

“But I do believe that I can apply and be seriously considered. I may be new to this, but no one can deny my passion, and this is a passion I have never had for anything in my life before,” Anable said. “Accounting is not something you get passionate about. Doing tax returns is not a passionate calling. But this, activism, this is about passion.”

Anable said that he knows the HRC board has recently completed a strategic assessment to
decide “what kind of leader they want” to bring in to replace Solmonese. “I don’t know what they’ve decided, and I know I may not be it. What are my odds of getting the job? Probably not that good because I haven’t been doing this very long. But I am going to try.

“All I know is that I am going to apply. If I make the first cut, I’ll say, ‘Thank God.’ If I make the second cut, I’ll say, ‘Thank God.’ And if I get the job, I’ll say, ‘Oh, God!’” he laughed. “But if I do get it, I know I will love every minute of it.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition January 6, 2012.

—  Kevin Thomas

GIVEAWAY: Cafe Brazil and Dickey’s swag bags

In this week’s Tasting Notes, we mentioned a giveaway of foodie swag from both Cafe Brazil and Dickey’s Barbecue. Both were generous donate some fun gift bags for Dallas Voice readers.

For the coffee lover, the Cafe Brazil bag includes a pound of coffee and a $25 gift card. To sweeten the pot, we threw in an extra $5 gift certificate to Capriotti’s and a CD single of Meital’s “Yummy Boyz.”

Fly your beef-lovin’ flag with a Dickey’s t-shirt, their signature yellow cup and a bottle of their barbecue sauce. They even included a brander with their logo celebrating their 70th anniversary. Yes, a brander. A meal coupon and Liz Primo’s EP Exposed is also part of the swag.

Want one? We’ll give it to ya. Mail us here with “I want swag in a bag” in the subject line with your name and contact info in the body and swag bag preference. Winners will be selected on Monday and must be able to pick up the bag from our offices. One bag per winner.

—  Rich Lopez

Singer Wynter Gordon to appear at Union Jack

Up and coming dance diva Wynter Gordon announced an appearance this Saturday at Union Jack for a couple of reasons. This is the final weekend of the store’s 40th Anniversary month, and she’ll be appearing later that night at the House of Blues’ Cambridge Room with Patrick Stump and John West. Clearly a win-win sitch.

The singer, who currently has the single “‘Til Death,” will be signing autographs and CDs of her newest release With the Music I Die. She has a thing for death apparently. You could also win tickets to the show!

She’ll appear at Union Jack, 3920 Cedar Springs Road, from 2–4 p.m.

 

 

—  Rich Lopez

Union Jack celebrates 40th anniversary

JUST JACK  |  Union Jack owner Richard Longstaff stands behind the counter of his Cedar Springs Road store, which celebrates its 40th anniversary in August. (David Taffet/Dallas Voice)

Cedar Springs store may be oldest gay-owned business still operating under original owner — who still retains British citizenship

DAVID TAFFET | Staff Writer
taffet@dallasvoice.com

In August, Union Jack, the clothing store on Cedar Springs Road, celebrates 40 years in business. To celebrate its 40th anniversary, the store will run weekly specials through August.

Owner Richard Longstaff said his business is the oldest gay business with continuous ownership under the same name. He said Club Dallas may have been in business longer, but the name has changed as well as the ownership.

Longstaff opened Union Jack in 1971 on Hillcrest Avenue across from Southern Methodist University. About a year later, he began looking for a new location and moved to Cedar Springs Road because gays started moving to the area and, he said, because it was just a nice place to be.

Union Jack’s history

When Longstaff moved Union Jack to Oak Lawn, he said his was the only gay business on the street. Lobo bookstore was already there, but wasn’t a gay business at the time, he said, adding that he isn’t even sure if its owner was out yet.

But back then, Lobo, which in its later years was mostly known for selling gay porn videos and magazines, was originally a bookstore specializing in Texas history.

Other stores on the street didn’t particularly welcome Union Jack, a store that always marketed to the gay community, Longstaff said.

At the time, surrounding businesses included a pool hall where TapeLenders now stands and the Old Warsaw restaurant, located approximately where the Round-Up Saloon is today.

Across the street were a laundry where JR.’s is, an office supply store, a grocery and Adairs.

“Adair’s was a redneck bar,” Longstaff said. “They had a hard time adjusting to the street turning gay.”

As a gay Pride promotion, Longstaff once put two go-go boys and a drag queen in his store window. The folks at Adairs called the police.

The officers who answered the call thought the drag queen was a woman and realized the go-go boys were appropriately dressed, so Longstaff was allowed to continue his promotion.

Adairs finally gave up and moved, he said.

Back when Union Jack moved to the strip, a grocery stood where TMC: The Mining Company is now.

“There was never much on the shelves,” Longstaff said. “The grocery was a front for drug dealers.”

The grocery closed and reopened but was actually a Dallas Police Department drug sting operation.

Slowly other gay businesses moved onto the street. The Bronx opened in 1975. Under Arrest, which later became Nuvo, shared the space. Frank Caven opened his first Cedar Springs bar, called The Candy Store, in the mid-70s. TapeLenders opened in 1980, renting Beta tapes.

In 1989, a fire that began in the Gay Community Center next door to Union Jack destroyed much of that side of the street.

Union Jack moved to a temporary space next to Crossroads Market. Longstaff said that although the store was a total loss, regular deliveries continued arriving. Within two weeks, he had enough merchandise to reopen.

Rebuilding took about 18 months. He said the insurance company dragged its feet in paying claims, and that the Round-Up Saloon experienced the same delay.

Longstaff said both he and the building’s owner were underinsured. His insurance barely covered his loss, he said.

“We scurried around to buy used racks,” he said. “The store looked like crap but we knew it was a temporary location. Business fell off 50 percent.”

Longstaff would have preferred that the space beExa rebuilt with higher ceilings, he said, but insurance wouldn’t cover that. He said that when the new store opened, for the first time it looked like a professional retail establishment.

During his 40 years in business, Longstaff has relied on his own marketing sense. The store sold bellbottoms in 1971. He became Levi’s biggest vendor for 501s.

The farm and ranch line became popular in the gay community.

“We were selling 1,000 pair a month,” he said. “We were washing them before Levi washed them themselves.”
He had a commercial washing machine in the back to preshrink the denims to fit.

By the time of the fire, Levi was pre-washing 501s so the new store wasn’t outfitted with washers.

As 501s became common in mall stores, sales dropped at Union Jack and a few years ago, Longstaff said, he discontinued carrying the line.

Today, Longstaff likes to distinguish his store with products that are American-made by gay-owned companies. His store manager, Kim Johnson, said probably 18 of the brands they carry fall into that category including Andrew Christian, Pistol Pete, Guillermo and YMLA.

Longstaff’s history

Longstaff was born in Great Britain and came to this country in 1965. He first lived in Norman, Okla., where a former boyfriend from England was teaching.

That boyfriend sponsored him for a green card, something impossible since immigration laws were changed in 1968.

“At the time, immigration was open to northern Europeans,” he said.

Longstaff went to work for Braniff in the cargo department and moved to Dallas when he decided to open a retail store. For the first couple of years after opening Union Jack, he continued working for the airline.

Although getting his green card was easy, his attempt to become a U.S. citizen took more than eight years and went all the way to the Supreme Court.

Longstaff said he filled out the forms and went to immigration with two witnesses. The witnesses were interviewed and then Longstaff was questioned.

He said he was asked three times if he was a homosexual, each time louder and louder, the third time with a slam of the fist on the desk.

“Rather than perjure myself or show lack of candor, I answered,” he said. “Then they tried to pin me down.”

He admitted to having sex in Colorado — where it was legal — but had a sudden lapse of memory about where any other encounters may have taken place.

“Judge Joe Estes screamed and shouted at me,” Longstaff said, and the judge told immigration officers to find some reason to deny him citizenship.

The case was appealed to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which upheld the denial of citizenship based on Longstaff having a psychopathic personality. Immigration law used the term and meant it to include gays and lesbians.

The American Psychological association, however, had recently changed its definition, so Rep. Barney Frank co-sponsored a law with Wyoming Republican Alan Simpson to remove homosexuality from the legal definition of psychotic personality in immigration law.

Based on that new law, the case was appealed to the Supreme Court, which denied hearing the case on the grounds that it would affect too few people.

Rep. Mickey Leland, who represented the Montrose area of Houston where Longstaff’s second store was located, challenged immigration officials. He asked if they were going to deport this business owner. He also had legislation prepared to keep Longstaff in the country if immigration officials did begin deportation procedures.

Immigration backed down and made a deal that they would return Longstaff’s green card if he agreed not to apply for citizenship again.

The story made international news, which is how he came out to his family when the story appeared in British newspapers.

Although achieving the status of owning the oldest gay business still owned by its original owner, Longstaff maintains his British citizenship to this day.

—  John Wright

ANNIVERSARIES: Louise Young and Vivienne Armstrong, George Amerson and Mike Grossman

ARMSTRONG-YOUNG  | Louise Young and Vivienne Armstrong celebrated their 40th anniversary Monday, April 18. The couple met on the campus of the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1971 through the Gay Liberation Front organization there. They had a civil union in Vermont in 2000 and were legally married in California in August 2008.

 

GROSSMAN-AMERSON  | George Amerson and Mike Grossman marked their 40th anniversary Wednesday, April 20, after celebrating the event with a gathering of family and friends the previous weekend. Grossman is a Minneapolis native who had lived in Dallas a year when he met Amerson, a native of west Texas who had already lived in Dallas several years when they met. The couple say they are most proud of their children, Laura and Devon Cloud and Barney and Stephanie Grossman, and their grandchildren, Miles and Rachel. The two work in residential real estate, Grossman for 50 years and Amerson for more than 35 years.

—  John Wright

TABC, Fort Worth consider settlement with patrons injured in Rainbow Lounge raid

Tom Anable

Fort Worth city administrators are recommending that the City Council approve a settlement with Chad Gibson, one of the patrons who was injured in the Rainbow Lounge raid. The pending settlement is a result of mediation among the city, the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission and Gibson’s attorneys.

The amount of the settlement from the city is $400,000. The amount from TABC has not been released.

The raid by Fort Worth police officers and TABC agents occurred on June 28, 2008, the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion.

Gibson suffered a head injury. George Armstrong was also injured and is included in the settlement. Pending felony charges against Gibson and Armstrong were dropped toward the end of last year before the mediation began.

Three Fort Worth police officers received short suspensions, and two TABC agents were fired, as a result of the incident.

Tom Anable, a founder of Fairness Fort Worth, a group formed in the wake of the raid, said he’s pleased that the city had come to an agreement.

“I think that the willingness of the city to enter into mediation without a federal lawsuit being filed is an indication of their willingness to move forward with our community,” Anable said.

Anable said this is the first time the city has entered into mediation without the threat of a federal lawsuit and the first time a city and TABC entered into joint negotiations.

“That speaks volumes of the city and of TABC,” Anable said. “No one wants to go backward, and that’s the story.”

While Anable said he has no inside information about the negotiations, he added, “As with any mediation, it’s successful if neither side is really happy but both are satisfied.”

Carolyn Beck, a spokeswoman for TABC, said, “TABC has engaged in settlement discussions with [Gibson] attorney Don Tittle. At this time the parties have agreed not to comment on those discussions until any resolution is finalized.”

Adam Seidel, an attorney for Gibson and Armstrong, was not available for comment this morning.

The item is on the agenda for Tuesday’s Fort Worth City Council meeting.

Gibson, who was hospitalized after the raid, is still receiving treatment for the injuries he sustained.

—  David Taffet

Top 10: FW changes continued in wake of Rainbow Lounge

Rainbow.Lounge
FROM PROTEST TO PARTY | The Rev. Carole West, left, and David Mack Henderson, right, both of Fairness Fort Worth, are shown with Chief Jeffrey Halstead during a barbecue at the Rainbow Lounge on June 28 to mark the one-year anniversary of the raid. (Tammye Nash/Dallas Voice)

No. 8:

View all of the Top 10

When the Fort Worth Police Department  and the Texas Alcoholic Beverage raided the Rainbow Lounge on June 28, 2009 — the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion — it sparked outrage around the world and enough headlines to fill newspapers for the rest of the year.

But the story didn’t end with 2009, as repercussions from the raid continued this year.

Publicity from the raid undoubtedly helped punch up business for the Rainbow Lounge, enough so that by January, the bar’s owner, J.R. Schrock, announced that he had a second bar — Percussions — in the works, as well as a third club and possibly a fourth.

In February — despite acknowledgments from both TABC and FWPD that the raid should never have happened — officials with the Fort Worth city attorney’s office said they were going ahead with efforts to prosecute those arrested in the raid, including Chad Gibson, the young man who suffered a lasting brain injury while in TABC custody.

One of Fort Worth police Chief Jeff Halstead’s first acts after the raid was to appoint openly gay officer Sara Straten as his department’s first full-time liaison to the LGBT community.

On June 28, as a way of highlighting the progress the city had made in the year since the raid and improved relations between the police department and the LGBT community, Rainbow Lounge held a party attended by Halstead, Straten and many of the officers who patrol the area in which the bar is located.

Despite the progress though, in July anti-gay forces packed the City Council chambers to once again protest the council’s vote the previous November to amend Fort Worth’s nondiscrimination ordinance to offer protections to transgenders and other initiatives proposed by the City Manager’s Diversity Task Force.

At the end of the public comments section of the meeting, Mayor Mike Moncrief told the crowd that while “there is room for all of us” in Fort Worth, “What’s in the Bible or what isn’t in the Bible, that’s not our job. Our job is to maintain the quality of life in our city, and that’s what this [diversity] training is all about.”

As the year continued, more examples of the changes in the city emerged: The police department reached out to the LGBT community in looking for new recruits. Halstead announced plans to start a hate crimes unit. The annual Tarrant County gay Pride celebration expanded, adding a block party and holding a parade and picnic far larger than in years past.

In September, the council quietly approved adding domestic partner benefits for lesbian and gay city employees, and in mid-November, the city attorney’s office announced that all charges against those arrested in the raid were being dropped.

Perhaps one of the most welcome results of the Rainbow Lounge raid, however, was the emergence and continued growth of Fairness Fort Worth.

Formed quickly in the wake of the raid to offer assistance to witnesses who wanted to testify during investigations into the raid, the group has morphed into an active LGBT advocacy organization complete with officers and a strategy for the future — filling a void that has long existed in Tarrant County’s LGBT community.

— Tammye Nash

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition December 31, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas

Hey, Judy

For the 40th anniversary of the Cathedral of Hope, wacky comedienne
Judy Tenuta will perform a human sacrifice. Hey! It could happen

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

COH 40TH ANNIVERSARY
Infomart, 1950 Stemmons
Freeway.  July 24 at 7 p.m.
$40.  CathedralofHope.com.

Earlier this month, Judy Tenuta judged a celebrity chef challenge at the Giant Orange Festival in California. The comedian likely had some A-list nibbles that day, but that won’t compare to what she expects to put her mouth on when she comes to Dallas. Tenuta, in fact, has some big expectations:

“I’m coming out there to punish you pigs and I want to strap a saddle around a beefy burrito of manhood!”

A clearer picture couldn’t be painted. The accordion-playing comedian/actress isn’t heading this way for a night at the Improv. No, she and her love slaves will partake in the Cathedral of Hope’s 40th anniversary celebration — which clearly notes this isn’t your mother’s church event. And despite her sexually charged act, Tenuta might be right at home playing for the church crowd.

“I’m the Love Goddess,” she proclaims. “I bless my gay men and women. Oh, and this isn’t gonna be boring like church, it’s gonna be a sassy, fun sermon.”

Tenuta may seem a product of the ’80s, where you expect her to pop on any VH1 special about the decade or as an answer in Trivial Pursuit’s Totally ’80s edition. But the funny lady famous for her bevy of musclestuds and her signature slogan “It could happen!” hasn’t disappeared. Instead, she’s figuring out her place in today’s entertainment world dominated by the likes of her comic successors like Sarah Silverman and Kathy Griffin.

“Celebrity is about scandal,” she says. “You have to be on TV shows. I need to get on America’s Most Wanted, but I’m not like Charlie Sheen — I’m a law-abiding citizen. Who are these housewives of so-and-so getting these shows? If you throw tables at each other and start fights, you get a show. I was supposed to be on Dancing with the Stars but it seems like a beating. But if Clitoris Leachman can do it…”

Judy Tenuta
THE MANY FACES OF THE LOVE GODDESS | Whether she’s dissing on Sarah Palin or looking like a housewife of Orange County, Tenuta is still a goddess with ‘beefy burritos of manhood’ never far off.

Tenuta is still in the game even without a reality show. She’s been on the road with her Full Frontal Tenudity tour and played a nun in the indie film Sister Mary last year with gay pal Bruce Villanch. (She calls the movie “campy fun for the gays.”) If the comic career path doesn’t work out for her though, she does have a fall-back perfect for her Dallas gig: Tenuta is an ordained minister.

“In my religion, Judyism, gays have the right to be married,” she says. “I’m an ordained minister and the Goddess performs same-sex marriages. I wanna know why the gays are only allowed to be married in the most rustic places like Vermont. What’s there other than syrup and moose? Or Iowa? That’s nice if you need sheep.”

She was shocked that California, the most liberal state — and her home — passed Prop 8. With that, “don’t ask, don’t tell,” and other headlines, she wanted to return the favor to her gay fans that stood by her through even the lean years.

“I want to stand up for them for their rights and give them joy and fun,” she says. “They do the same for me. There is this great sense of fun and love in the community. It’s so much larger than life — like me!”

She hasn’t made plans to preside over nuptials in Dallas, but she is on the hunt. She’ll be recruiting her beefy burritos from the audience at the Saturday celebration. After collecting her hunky entourage, she’ll take on the likes of BP, Lindsay Lohan and border patrol.

“We’ve been talking for years about keeping out illegals — they should send those bitches back to England! That oil is so nasty,” she says. “What’s the point of that ankle SCRAM on Lohan? She just uses it to hold her liquor. Do not let her out in the open.”

Tenuta will be happy to know that Lohan is behind bars. But two celebrities she’s curious about are Dallas residents. When she found out the Bushes lived in Big D, she was fascinated.

You could almost hear the jokes working themselves out. Tenuta took particular interest in the Facebook page campaigning for Laura Bush to be part of this year’s Pride parade after she came out in support of same-sex marriage.

“No kidding! I have to give her a lot of credit,” she says. “Laura Bush, the ex-First Lady. I’d hope she’d stop by, but she strikes me more as going to a Julie Andrews concert. She should do the parade but she’d certainly do it without George Bush. We hate that pig.”

Hmm — that can’t be Judyo orthodoxy.

“Well, the religion is mostly there to forget about your problems by thinking about mine for a change.”

Sounds like religion we could get behind.

………………………….

COH Celebration continues with Sam Harris

Sam Harris
Sam Harris

Don’t underestimate the church’s ability to throw a party. While Judy Tenuta headlines Cathedral of Hope’s Saturday celebration, the festivities don’t end there. The night will also include dancing, live music, cocktails and food.

Sunday worship service won’t be anything to balk at, either. Accompanying the Rev. Jo Hudson’s sermon will be members of the Turtle Creek Chorale, Resounding Harmony, the Women’s Chorus of Dallas and special guest Sam Harris, pictured.

Yes, that Sam Harris. Winning the first Star Search in 1983 during the show’s first season, Harris has grown from reality show celeb to a major player in music, television and stage.  (Think of him as the Adam Lambert of the ’80s.) His signature song, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow,” is a favorite, but Harris has continued recording — his last album came was released in 2008. He’s also developing both a television show and a play about Al Jolson that’s not The Jazz Singer.

“This is so near and dear to my heart, but this is a psychological investigation of this incredibly powerful entertainer,” Harris says. “He was this megalomaniac, but also incredibly giving.”

Harris relates to that last virtue, mostly because he’s now a family man. He married his partner Danny Jacobsen in November 2008, months after adopting their son Cooper Atticus Harris-Jacobson, now 2. The family life hasn’t necessarily slowed Harris down, but it is a juggling act.

“When you have a kid, the day starts out at 100 miles per hour,” he says. “It is a bit of juggling but it’s such a huge blessing and my family is the core of my reason.”

Harris will be performing two songs at both worship services at the Meyerson, but he’ll also sit in during each as a guest. The church’s philosophies coincide with his own and he hopes he’s a good fit for the congregation.

“It’s a place of action and calls us to be our best selves,” he says. “Those are elements I try to make of my life. I recognize when I’m most fulfilled is that when I’m of service. The whole point is human connection; that’s why were here — to connect to find similarities and leave it better than when we found it.”

He should feel reassured he’s the perfect fit for the celebration.
— R.L.
Cathedral of Hope 40th Anniversary Worship at the Meyerson Symphony Center, 2301 Flora St. 9 and 11 a.m. Free. CathedralofHope.com.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition July 23, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas

Rainbow Lounge to mark anniversary of raid with party Monday


Rally protesting Rainbow Lounge raid
Within hours of Fort Worth police and TABC agents raiding the Rainbow Lounge on July 28, 2009 — the 40th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots — angry LGBT people and allies staged a protest outside the nightclub.

Monday, June 28 will be the one-year anniversary of the raid on the Rainbow Lounge, and the club will mark the date with a barbecue party, plus a meet-and-greet with Fort Worth Police Chief Jeff Halstead and about 20 of his officers, including the deputy chief and beat officers for the area.

The party is set for 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the Rainbow Lounge patio, 651 S. Jennings, and the first 125 people to get there will get barbecue and soft drinks.

A whole lot has changed in Fort Worth in the 12 months since two agents with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission and several FWPD officers raided the then-newly-opened gay bar on the 40th anniversary — almost to the minute — of the Stonewall Rebellion in New York. Watch the July 2 issue of Dallas Voice for a story on those changes.

We have had TONS and TONS of coverage of the raid and its aftermath. Here is one of our earliest stories.

—  admin