Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

Round-Up

Two panels for original Round-Up Saloon owner, Tom Davis

Alan Ross used to stage the parade almost singlehandedly. Now the parade is named for him.

David Barton opened Hunky’s with his brother Rick.

ASD

Three panels remember residents of AIDS Services Dallas. The panels only list them by first name.

Band

Oak Lawn Band

OLBA

Oak Lawn Bowling Association. Every group in the LGBT community lost friends.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

chorale

This Turtle Creek Chorale panel (lower left) was one of the earliest panels in the Quilt, made in 1987. It remembered the 12 members of the Chorale who had died of AIDS. Within a few years, the Chorale was remembering more than 100 members who had died.

Each year at their Christmas performances, they place one poinsettia on stage for each member they have lost to AIDS.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

NelsonTebedo

Bill Nelson and Terry Tebedo founded Crossroads Market. When they saw some of their customers were suddenly in need, they put up a shelf in the back of the store with a sign that read, “Leave a can, take a can.” That was the beginning of the AIDS Food Pantry.
Bill was the first openly gay person to run for Dallas city council. The campaign ran out of Crossroads Market. If you saw “Milk,” you understand the campaign playbook down to details like going to the bathhouses to find people to drive to the polls on Election Day. Bill and Terry were founders of DGLA and the Resource Center. In 1983, Bill was the first host of “Lambda Weekly” on KNON.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

Jon Benov

Jon Benov was my first partner.

He is remembered on a panel made by his bowling league in Atlanta.

Jon died 20 years ago next month in January, 1990.

—  David Taffet

Remembering friends on World AIDS Day

John Thomas

John Thomas was the first executive director of Resource Center Dallas — AIDS Resource Center, Gay and Lesbian Community Center, AIDS Food Pantry, Nelson-Tebedo Clinic. John sang with the Chorale and helped found the Women’s Chorus. John was an officer of DGLA. In the 80s and 90s, there was little John Thomas wasn’t involved in with our community.

John died in 1999.

The gay and lesbian community center and the bell wall at Cathedral of Hope are both named for him.

—  David Taffet

A Dallas panel from the Quilt on World AIDS Day

Quilt Panel

Duane Puryear made a panel for himself, which hung at the Resource Center for a couple of years. He took this panel to Washington for the first quilt display on the Mall.

On the way home from Washington, he left it in the overhead bin and it was never seen again.

However, there were a number of pictures of the panel. After he died, his mom recreated the original panel from pictures.

The panel displayed in the quilt is the recreation his mom made. The new panel hung at the Resource Center until it was inducted into the quilt in a ceremony at Fair Park.

Because of its powerful, yet simple message, this remains the most requested panel in the quilt.

Also in this block are other Dallas panels.

Don Weiner was president of Congregation Beth El Binah. He applied for the group to become a member of the Union for Reform Judaism but died before the predominantly gay and lesbian synagogue was accepted into the mainstream movement in 1993. The half star was the synagogue’s logo at the time.

The AIDS Mastery Workshop was a group that met at the Resource Center and helped people deal with their diagnosis at a time when there were no drugs to treat HIV.

—  David Taffet