Jurni Rayne Karaoke tonight at the Brick

This is a Jurni…into sound

For us non-singers, it’s daunting to partake in karaoke. A few drinks are necessary to take on Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline.” That’s where the host comes in, because they usually have the better voice. And in this case, Jurni Rayne has a phenomenal one. She hosts The Brick’s Tuesday night karaoke, but really, you just may want to hear her belt out a few ones.

DEETS: The Brick, 2525 Wycliff Ave. 9 p.m. BrickDallas.com.

—  Rich Lopez

Drawing Dallas • 11.25.11

As ‘Twilight’ returns, Skylar Brooks shows blood sucking can be a service

MARK STOKES  | Illustrator
mark@markdrawsfunny.com

Name and age: Skylar Brooks, 24

Occupation: Testing coordinator, Resource Center Dallas, and shift manager, Starbucks

Spotted at: Exxon on the Run at Maple and Oak Lawn

A twinkle in her unbelievably pale blue eyes and an effervescent smile are the first things you notice about this fine Virgo. Born in Monroe, La., and raised in Euless and Bedford, the perpetually positive Skylar considers herself a clown and a jokester — smiles and laughter come to her quite freely. She came out at 16.

She loves the nightlife. Skylar loves to dance, and her freestyle moves on the floor have garnered her three “dance off” wins at Station 4. She also loves to sing, especially R&B (Brian McKnight is a favorite). She auditioned for American Idol last year, and while she didn’t get through, says she’s determined to try again. Her love of music and dance is hereditary: Her mother was on the drill team and danced ballet, and her father plays drums and the trumpet and loves to belt out a song.

In addition to indoor activities, she plays midfield and forward in a local soccer league, and basketball for fun. Skylar loves to travel, she has a special affinity for the Caribbean (Dominican Republic, Bahamas).

Enter love  “Three months in, I knew she was the one,” says Skylar of her fiancé, Shereen, whom she met through mutual friends 18 months ago; they have a wedding set in Vermont next June. Both of their families are excited for them.

Skylar’s goal is to become a surgical technician. Her motto: “I help people one blood draw at a time.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 25, 2011.

—  Michael Stephens

Cultural Environment in Bible Belt promotes Gay Hate Crimes

Another obvious hate crime occurs in Tulsa, Oklahoma. These kinds of attacks are starting to get the attention and recognition from the local media that they deserve, but we have a long way to go before we are treated the same way as other suspect classes when they are attacked simply for being who they are.

Actually, a straight friend of mine was the one who notified me of this particular attack. He wanted to relay his experience at his day labor job site where he was working. He was disturbed that his coworkers, who consisted of four blue collar types, were not the least bit ashamed to laugh and make fun of the victim, during the segment on the local television news, while proclaiming, “Hahaha! That is what those f*ggots get for being there!” My friend felt compelled to tell me their reaction because he knows I’m active in civil rights for the LGBT community. If our government is serious about sending any message to our LGBT youth that “It gets better,” then they need to follow through on the promises made to our community that we will no longer be treated as second class citizens, and subject to state sanctioned discrimination and even violent assaults simply for being gay.

There is a pervasive cultural attitude by certain segments of society, especially in the southern United States, that LGBT people deserve to be attacked. There was a time when African Americans experienced this treatment and was completely ignored by the state. Imagine what would happen on a job site had an African American been assaulted and the workers taunted the victim by saying, “The (n-word) deserved what he got for being there!” Yes, less than sixty years ago those words would have been tolerated, embraced and even celebrated as part of the Southern culture. It was wrong then, and it is wrong now, even though they’ve simply chosen the LGBT community as their acceptable state sanctioned scapegoat.

Maybe next Thanksgiving we will be able to celebrate being more full and equal citizens of our own country? This Thanksgiving I’m thankful for the resolve to never give up and keep fighting until we have every single right all other Americans enjoy.




AMERICAblog Gay

—  admin