Movies That Changed the World: For the Bible Tells Me So

Dan Karslake’s award-winning For the Bible Tells Me So, released in 2007, received widespread acclaim for its examination of the chasm often found between gays and lesbians and Christianity, and its look at Scriptural misinterpretations that have allowed the Bible to be used as a tool of discrimination. Now, Entertainment Weekly is hailing the documentary as one of “5 Movies That Changed The World.”

Karslake’s film gave new hope for conflicted members of the LGBT community and advocates by offering a compelling look at the journeys of five normal, Christian families – including former House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt – as they sought to reconcile their faith with the reality of having a gay or lesbian family member. To accompany the film, HRC developed a comprehensive guide for driving powerful conversations about the LGBT community and the church.

HRC’s study guide and advocacy training curriculum served to facilitate open dialogues across the country and called on LGBT advocates to use the Bible as an instrument of healing rather than a weapon. A central underpinning of the guide is that “advocates for LGBT rights have the same right to claim religious and traditional values [as the Radical Right does] as motivating factors in their advocacy.” The curriculum also contains handouts on issues ranging from gender identity and the Bible, to Scriptures on which to base the welcome and rights of the LGBT community.

In 2008, Karslake connected HRC’s efforts to strengthen the dialogue to the film’s success: “HRC heavily promoted its theatrical run and organized an extensive series of discussion groups to accompany the film showing around the country. The success of these events was truly stunning and helped to generate excitement in harder-to-reach markets.” In advance of the curriculum’s release, Karslake expressed excitement about the potential of the guide to “spark conversations in congregations that most need the film’s powerful message.”

John Young’s “5 Movies That Changed The World” is available in the October 1 issue of Entertainment Weekly, currently on newsstands. Hear more from Karslake and HRC’s Religion and Faith Program Director Harry Knox about the movie’s impact. Check out the study guide and curriculum, which remain timely and important resources. To learn more about For the Bible Tells Me So, visit www.forthebibletellsmeso.org.


Human Rights Campaign | HRC Back Story

—  John Wright

Hear ‘Holly is a Homophobe’ live at Trees tonight

Straight local band Bible Fire hits with ‘Holly is a Homophobe’

Clearly, you should watch what you say around Rob Halstead or it could turn into a song.

When a day-job co-worker of the Bible Fire songwriter went on a hostile rant against the gays, Halston ripped her a new one by putting it to music.  The result was “Holly is a Homophobe,” a single from the local band’s new album The Pursuit of Imperfection. Unexpectedly, when the group performs, it’s one of their most requested and popular songs.

“Holly is this girl me and Grant [Scruggs, the band’s guitarist] both worked with,” Halstead says. “She’s an enigma to me because she’s so nice and caring and then prejudiced all the way around.” An example of the lyric: Holly is a homophobe / Disdainfully, she told me so / Her biggest fear is turning queer / And I just thought that everyone should know.

Read the rest of the article here.

DEETS: Trees, 2709 Elm St. Sept. 16. Doors open at 7 p.m. TreesDallas.com

—  Rich Lopez

Local briefs • 08.20.10

WRCC hosts ‘Sunday Show’

The White Rock Community Church Choir and Drama Ministry will present “The Sunday Show,” an old-fashioned radio show featuring interviews with “widows” from the Bible embellished with original songs, on Sunday. Aug. 29, at the church’s regular 10:45 a.m. service.

The program used catchy rhythms and talk show-style dialog to give the audience a new understanding of remarkable women from biblical times.

White Rock Community Church is located at 9353 Garland Road in Dallas. For more information call 214-320-0043 or go online to WhiteRockChurch.org.

Yoga of the Breath begins Aug. 27

The next Yoga of the Breath course for People Living with HIV begins Friday Aug, 27 and is open to everyone living with HIV, which includes caregivers, partners and other family members of people with HIV.

The program is free of charge, and will be held at Pride Pharmacy, 2929 Carlisle St. in Dallas. Meals and transportation are provided.
For more information call 469-212-3797.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 20, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Karl Rove destroys his marriage

Karl Rove

Karl Rove

The architect of George Bush’s march to the White House and the man who engineered anti-gay marriage amendments in the name of “saving” marriage has gotten divorced.

Again. Yes. His second.

In the announcement, his spokesperson asked for privacy.

Really?

He thinks his marriage is a private matter that the press shouldn’t exploit? He thinks we should keep our noses out of it because a marriage or in this case a divorce — is a private matter? Blow it out your bigoted ear Karl.

This disgusting piece of crap is the person responsible for all of that “marriage hasn’t changed since Biblical times” and “the sanctity of marriage that gay people are trying to destroy” garbage. Something he made up to scare people. To get right wing extremists, bigots and just plain dumb people to the polls. And it worked.

By the way, what makes his exploitation of gays and lesbians so heinous is that he was raised by his two gay dads. And, apparently, he wasn’t rebelling against them. He was close to them.

But now he’s divorced. The judge should never have granted the divorce. He should have told him that in Biblical times, a divorce could only be granted by a religious panel and that there was no such thing as an “amiable” divorce. And he’d like privacy.

—  David Taffet

Tell me what you think …

What constitutes “hate speech”?

A large number of religious leaders opposed the recently-enacted Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Law because they said it would make it a criminal offense for them to preach in their churches that homosexuality is a sin. But is that hate speech, or a reasonable expression of religious beliefs?

I don’t think the new law encroaches on anyone’s ability to preach that kind of sermon. I don’t think it’s hate speech, although I know plenty of people disagree with me on that. Many, many people do believe that homosexuality is a sin, and surely they have the right to express that belief.

But if a preacher stands in his or her pulpit on a Sunday morning and tells the congregation that God says homosexuals should be put to death and then encourages the members of that congregation to carry out God’s word — is that hate speech? Is that constitutionally protected?

Would your opinion of whether or not someone expressing their religious views constituted “hate speech” change if the person were an Imam in an Islamic extremist sect saying that the Koran teaches that the U.S. is “the great Satan” and that Allah decrees Americans should be killed, and then encouraging his followers to stage attacks to carry out Allah’s decree?

Where do we draw the line? Do we draw a line at all? Should people be able to say whatever they want just because they believe a religious text tells them to? How do we decide what is “valid” religious text? Is the Bible more valid than the Koran or the Book of Mormon or the teachings of Buddha?

Tell me what you think.

—  admin