If you read Dallas Voice’s food section, you’d have known the best taqueria in town months ago

IMG_1201Friday is Dallas Voice’s annual Food Issue, but to get it started, we’ll be doing some blog posts to, let’s say, whet your appetite.

First up: Here is why you should read our food section regularly. Last March, I stopped by a neighborhood taqueria its first night of operation. I was, in fact, the first official customer for this unsuspecting West Dallas storefront, sandwiched between auto shops on Singleton Boulevard. The decor? None. The waitstaff? No existent. The menu? Really limited — like, six items. Total. Three tacos, three quesadillas. You had to work to break ten bucks.

I ordered two tacos and a quesadillas …. and I was wowed by what I tasted. I stopped by three more times in the next 10 days; within a month, I had published the first-ever review of Trompo. I raved. I Instagrammed and Facebooked and Tweeted its delights. It was never very crowded when I went it, but damn was it great.

IMG_0961If you had paid attention to me then — and some did — you would have been on the ground floor of something that has become something of a phenomenon. Last month, Bon Appetit magazine declared humble little Trompo one of the top 50 new restaurants. In America.

The acclaim has led to huge lines, sellouts, even new hours (from “until 10 p.m.” to “until we run out”). I’m delighted for owner/chef Luis Olvera. He’s hiring more staff. It’s great for Dallas, great for tacos. And you could have been going there for months… without the lines. So listen up! We have more food news ahead…. before Bon Appetit gets it. Pick up the Voice Friday for more … and check back on the website all the time for foodie news.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Overtures: Our classical music calendar

Bell Joshua_ Perf shot 1 2010_PC Eric Kabik

Now that the holiday concerts are behind us, the classical season returns in full in February — and none too soon. Our classical music expert, Gregory Sullivan Isaacs, offers these notes on what to look for in February:

• Things start out with the truly amazing pianist, Nobuyuki Tsujii. Born blind, the 24-year-old Japanese man tied for the gold medal at the 2009 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. He learns all of his scores (some of the most complex in the repertoire) one note at a time. His performance has to be experienced live to be understood. You can hear him with the Fort Worth Symphony on Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 1 and 2, at 8 p.m., and Sunday for a 2 p.m. matinee. He will play Tchaikovsky’s first concerto, which rocketed Van Cliburn himself to fame in 1958 in Moscow.

• Next weekend, the Dallas Opera takes you into both the oven and the frying pan with Lee Hoiby’s Opera Bon Appetit! Mezzo soprano Susan Nicely portrays food goddess and gay icon Julia Child in this tuneful and delicious amuse bouche. It’s a one-day-only event (Feb. 9), but there are two performances: one at 11:30 a.m. and one at 2 p.m. It will be presented not in the opera house, but in the Dallas Farmers Market Demonstration Kitchen. Where else? Admission is free, but reservations are needed.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Weekly Best Bets

Friday 03.18

Footes won’t fail you now
Honoring the Texas playwright, the theater community unites for the first Horton Foote Festival. The fest kicks off with DTC’s Dividing the Estate. but even a touch of gay can be found with The Young Man from Atlanta, which Uptown Players will perform in April.
DEETS:
Various theaters and venues. Through May 1. Visit HortonFooteFestival.com for details.

Friday 03.18

When wine strolls attack
Savor Dallas is upon us again, filling the weekend with food, wine and fabulosity. The event starts off with an Arts District Wine Stroll within the museums and venues. Just don’t get tipsy and spill the wine on the art. That’s a whole lot of bad karma. And look for local celebrichefs like Stephan Pyles and Blythe Beck. Bon appetit!
DEETS:
Various venues. 5 p.m. $35. Through Saturday. Visit SavorDallas.com for schedule.

Saturday 03.19

Hey, why don’t you go take a walk
Designer Anthony Chisom took issues into his own hands starting the Anthony Chisom AIDS Foundation and creating the inaugural South Dallas AIDS Walk. Seeing the impact of AIDS beyond the gayborhood, Chisom’s foundation strives to expand the city’s vision of where AIDS impacts. After all, it is the same fight for the cure.
DEETS: South Dallas Cultural Center, 3400 S. Fitzhugh Ave. 8 a.m. SouthDallasAIDSWalk.org.

—  John Wright