Organizers cancel gay-themed Super Bowl concert at Cotton Bowl after only 13 tickets sold

The big gay Super Bowl concert planned for the Cotton Bowl on Thursday night has been canceled due to poor ticket sales, according to Ariana Hajibashi, publicist for the now-two-night XLV Party

Hajibashi said only 13 tickets had been sold for Thursday night’s concert featuring Lady Bunny, the Village People and Cazwell, which was marketed specifically to the LGBT community.

“Our Friday and Saturday are packed, but Thursday didn’t sell anything,” Hajibashi said. “I understand that everybody in Dallas is a last-minute ticket buyer, but unfortunately with only 13 tickets sold four days out, we couldn’t invest an additional $100,000 dollars. We couldn’t have a 6,000-square-foot space with 100 people in it. It kind of makes us sad because we were really trying to do an event for the GLBT community. Everybody else is focused on the sports angle and things like that, so we’re disappointed that we didn’t get any attention.”

Hajibashi said cold weather had nothing to do with the cancellation, because the tent over the Cotton Bowl will be heated. She said organizers thought they had a great lineup that would appeal to the gay community.

The XLV Party is still on for Friday and Saturday nights, and tickets are now as low as $59 per night for a limited time. As we mentioned earlier, Outtakes Dallas is giving away tickets.

A full press release is after the jump.

—  John Wright

Outtakes Dallas giving away 2 tickets to XLV Party at the Cotton Bowl for Friday or Saturday night

Seems like you won’t be able to swing a dead cat in DFW over the next week without hitting a Super Bowl-centered party. And one of the biggest one will be the XLV Party on Friday and Saturday night at Fair Park. Tickets for the party are selling out fast, with general admission tickets going for $99 through Wednesday, Feb. 2 at the XLV Party website.

Buying a general admission ticket the day of the show will set you back $225. VIP passes are $159 through Wednesday, jumping to $300 on the day of the show, and backstage passes are $500.

But for those of you whose wallets can’t bear that heavy a load, there is still hope: Outtakes Dallas — the LGBT film festival — will be giving away two general admission tickets to XLV Party, good for either Friday night or Saturday night, through an online contest. All you have to do is visit the Outtakes Dallas Facebook page, “like” Outtakes and add a comment about why you love LGBT film.

Entries will be accepted through 5 p.m. on Wednesday, and the winners notified shortly thereafter.

It’s true that the big “gay” acts will be performing at the party on Thursday, which isn’t one of the available dates for the free tickets, but the lineups for Friday and Saturday nights ain’t too shabby! Friday night features a DJ set by electropop group Passion Pit ,., ,. The evening benefits Kidd’s Kids.

Sublime with Rome headlines Saturday night’s party, along with official Beastie Boys cover band Rhymin & Stealin, DJ Martinson, DJ Pullano and alt rockers Exit 380. Saturday night benefits Friends of Fair Park.

Head on over to the Outtakes website for more info.

—  admin

Music. Score!

THE BOI AND THE COWBOY | Generations collide when Cazwell, right, and Cowboy Jeff Olson of the Village People bring their very gay music to the Cotton Bowl on Thursday, Feb. 3.

Musicians including Cazwell and Jeff Olson of the Village People head to Texas for a big gay Super Bowl party — although neither is all that excited about the game

All’s well that Cazwell

Who knew it just takes a popsicle to rise to stardom? Just ask Katy Perry. Or Cazwell, whose colorful music video for “Ice Cream Truck” became the gay anthem of last summer. With hot dancers and sexualized frozen confections, it has an infectious beat and a sense of joy that combined to make it a huge hit for the artist.

Just don’t expect the Ice Cream Truck Boys to join Cazwell when he’s in town next week for XLV Party, a three-day event inside a 60,000-square-foot climate-controlled tent on the field of the Cotton Bowl. The festivities kick off with a super-gay night of entertainment on Thursday. And even with the likes of Lady Bunny, DJ Inferno and the iconic Village People sharing stage time, Cazwell plans to bring it.

Describing himself as what would result if Biggie Smalls ate Donna Summer, Cazwell has combined the energy of dance music with the soul of hip-hop for a fun, modern sound that is all about getting people to have fun and dance.

“I’m going to turn it out. It’s going to be a high-energy show,” he says. “I’m going to do a combination of my dance songs but I also just want to kick back and wrestle with some beats and some rhymes. I think people will get to know me a little better as an artist.”

XLV Party will mark Cazwell’s second appearance in Dallas in less than a year and he’s anxious to come back.

“I was in Dallas last summer. It was really, really good. I was very surprised by the turnout. I wasn’t expecting so many fans,” he says. “We did a meet-and-greet that lasted three hours.”

His fan base has grown exponentially since “Ice Cream Truck,” but he still remembers the days when even Lady Gaga couldn’t get a reaction from a New York crowd.

“We did a song together at a club called Family. She’d always been kind of eccentric, but really down-to-earth. We had this stage that was like the size of a door, but she took it seriously. She crammed two dancers up there and then I got up there and she said, ‘I’m going to throw you to the ground and ride you like I’m fucking you and the audience is going to go crazy,’” he recalls. The gimmick landed with a thud.

“Somewhere there’s footage of it, but I can’t find it. The funny thing about it is that we really didn’t get the reaction we thought we were going to get. Nobody knew who she was so they just kind of looked at us with their arms folded. Like great, here’s another club kid with a song. Six months later, everybody knew who Lady Gaga was.”

Cazwell has garnered a loyal following on the New York club scene and has broken out with hit songs like, “I Seen Beyonce at Burger King” and “All Over Your Face,” but “Ice Cream Truck” is really where things clicked with a larger audience. And it almost didn’t happen.

“I didn’t want to write a new song; I was feeling really lazy. But a friend was pressuring me,” he says. “I wrote it for this movie called Spork, which won a bunch of awards for the Tribeca Film Festival and is going nationwide in May. My friend said he wanted a beat that sounded like an ice cream truck. We did the whole thing in like 45 minutes. It was just really, really easy.”

He wasn’t going to do anything with it until his manager suggested he make a quick video “to the song to get my face out there. It made me think of summertime and the hot Latin guys in my neighborhood. We all know a bunch of guys, dancers from the club scene so we invited them all over. No one was paid. We’re all friends and they just wanted to be a part of it.”

The video become a sensation across Facebook and video sites like YouTube, and with it came legions of new fans. But that’s OK … for now.

“I think that right now I’m in a good time in my life because I think the people that come up to me are genuine fans. I think when you get more famous, people want to meet you just because you’re famous. That could get tedious. I’m sure people go up to Lady Gaga just because she’s Lady Gaga, not because they respect her music,” Cazwell says.

“I feel right now that people are being genuine with me. I hope they’re people I’ve had a positive effect on because when people tell me that, it really makes me feel really good.”

And as for his excitement over the Super Bowl? Well, not so much. Cazwell admits he’s not a football fan — or a fan of any sport for that matter.

“I’m not passionate about sports at all. I don’t get it. I see sports on the news and wonder how that’s a news story. It’s just a game!” he says.

That’s all right. We see him as more a concessions guy anyway … like, the ice cream truck.

— Steven Lindsey

Cowboy up

Despite the cheeky allure of the Village People, the concept band is nothing to laugh at. After 34 years, the quintessential disco band still gets audiences to do the “Y.M.C.A.” dance. A  Rolling Stone cover, a Walk of Fame star and million-selling albums are nothing to sniff at.

Jeff Olson jumped onboard after the peak of the Village People’s popularity in the late 1970s, but he’s still enjoying the ride three decades later.

“Our first and foremost obligation is to just entertain,” he says. “We are obligated to do it and I’d say we do it very well.”

As a VP veteran, Olson sounds less like a music star and more like an elder slacker. He has a relaxed, cool inflection as he talks up his favorite classic rock bands and will say “man” after most everything. He’s the kind of guy you could kill a few hours with, as long as a beer and maybe something to smoke are handy.

The People don’t talk much about the sexuality of its members, but it’s hard to ignore the impact the group had on the gay community in the ’70s.

After the band floundered in the ’80s when Olson joined to replace original VP Cowboy Randy Jones, the gay audience stuck around.

“I don’t think we’ve had any change with the gay fans. They have always been very loyal and we’re still very grateful about that,” he says. “We’ve done lots to increase our other fans but really, nobody gives a shoot. Who cares anymore about gay or straight thing? We’re on this earth for very short time.”

At 60, Olson feels great and is obviously in shape to do the dance moves, but if it were up to him, he’d stay home. Still, the fans drive him to keep entertaining.

“I hate being on the road,” he admits. “When you live out of a suitcase, so much sucks like trying to get through TSA these days. I love being home, but we really love what we do.”

Where each Village Person represented a distinctive male archetype of gay fantasy, Olson is coy about the popularity of his cowboy image — though as any weekend at the Round-Up Saloon would prove, cowboys are a sexy commodity in Dallas. Olson won’t say if his cowboy is more popular with the boys than the others, but he lets out what sounds like a proud chuckle.

“Honestly I do not know and I don’t care,” he says.” The audiences react differently to all of us. We’re introduced individually so the reaction changes all the time. It’s always all good.”

The irony of Olson coming with the Village People for the very gay night of the Super Bowl party is that sports and crowds aren’t his thing.

“Nah, I don’t follow football,” he says. “And you wanna know a secret? I’m paranoid about crowds. I don’t do well with them and I need space. I don’t like signing autographs because folks don’t do the things they should do as a human being. But one on one I’m good with.”

Despite getting a few things off his chest, Olson mostly wants to remind that the Village People don’t necessarily stand for anything … but they will make you dance.

— Rich Lopez

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Jan. 28, 2011.

—  John Wright

Cazwell Invites You To Stop By His Frozen Yogurt Truck

We know that pop artists basically write their tracks with the intention of selling them to corporations for use in their ads (or sometimes corporations themselves commission the songs ahead of time), but I never thought Cazwell's "Ice Cream Truck" — a "song for retards," as he put it, that's basically an excuse for hotties with bubble butts to gyrate for the camera – would go on to see additional success. But the NYC-based gay rapper agreed to swap out "ice cream" for "frozen yogurt" for the British treats company Snog in a new endorsement deal. Apparently Snog's fro-yo is "super healthy," but anything is gonna be good for your body when it entices you you to get down like so:

CONTINUED »


Permalink | Post a comment | Add to del.icio.us


Tagged: , , , ,

Queerty

—  admin

DVtv: Cazwell at Station 4

To see photos from the show, go here.

—  John Wright

Cazwell at Station 4 on Sept. 30

Photos by Eric Scott Dickson/Arcus Media and Mandy Hendrickson/Dallas Voice

To watch video from the show, go here.

—  John Wright

Tweet of the Day: Cazwell has arrived

… And he wants to meet you and you and you and you. But not you.

Cazwell performs at midnight at Station 4 followed by a meet and greet.

—  Rich Lopez

Cazwell brings his ‘Ice Cream Truck’ to Station 4

Cazwell is serious about his music … even if he is a club diva

CazwellIn this week’s issue, Cazwell talked with the Dallas Voice about his approach to music. Just because he’s all about beefcake and sexy, funny lyrics doesn’t mean you should take him less seriously as a musician. He’ll tell you why.

The last time we saw Cazwell in town was at the now-defunct minc in Exposition Park. Then he was first touted as the gay Eminem, but he’s really in his own league layering outrageous raps over dance music. He’s more fun than Eminem with songs like “I Seen Beyonce at Burger King” and “All Over Your Face” from his 2009 album Watch My Mouth. The rapper-singer’s newest hit, “Ice Cream Truck,” is big on the dance floor which I’m sure has nothing to do with the video.

He performs an 18-and-up show at S4 on Sept. 30 at midnight. After his performance, he’s gonna stick around for a Meet and Greet. Maybe he’ll have a Bomb Pop just for you.

DEETS: Station 4, 3911 Cedar Springs Road. Sept. 30 at midnight. Doors at 9 p.m. $15. Caven.com.

—  Rich Lopez

Sticky sweet

Cheeky raps and beefcake videos? Yes. But Cazwell is serious about his music … even if he is a club diva

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

HIS ‘ICE CREAM’ BRINGS THE BOYS TO THE YARD  |  Damn right! Cazwell, in front with white hat, put together his viral video in a day, but the rap is poised to be his biggest hit yet — thanks in large part to all the beefcake.
HIS ‘ICE CREAM’ BRINGS THE BOYS TO THE YARD | Damn right! Cazwell, in front with white hat, put together his viral video in a day, but the rap is poised to be his biggest hit yet — thanks in large part to all the beefcake.

CAZWELL
Station 4, 3911 Cedar Springs Road. Sept. 30 at midnight. Doors at 9 p.m. $15.
Caven.com.

………………………………..

The most surprising thing about Cazwell is his soft-spoken demeanor. With all the bravado in his rhymes, ranging from overtly sexual to ridiculously fun, he’s really just a guy. He just happens to also be the toast of gay club culture. But first thing’s first.

“Normally it takes a couple of months of planning,” he says. “But we did this quick.”

He’s referring to “Ice Cream Truck,” his rap and video which has turned into a sensation on gay dancefloors everywhere.

With a bevy of scantily clad beefcakes, including the tattooed hunk himself, the music video is two minutes and change of amateur production that doesn’t matter one bit — its guerrilla roots aside, it’s sexy as hell. When the video pops up at Station 4, the boys aren’t hoppin’; they’re staring at the monitors.

“That’s awesome,” he chuckles. “We were just gonna run up an ice cream truck with some friends and make it into this summer video. I knew some of the guys; Marco [Ovando, the director] knew others, and they came over. We filmed the whole thing at my apartment in a day.”

The video was posted a month ago on YouTube by Cazwell’s label, Peace Bisquit, and has notched more than 2 million views. For what started out as “a stupid song” for a movie called Spork, the old-school rap recorded in three hours is positioned to be Cazwell’s biggest hit to date.

With this tune and others such as  “I Seen Beyonce at Burger King” and “I Buy My Socks on 14th Street,” it’s easy to get the impression that Cazwell is more club kid than musician. And that would be wrong.

“I am serious about music,” he says. “Just because I don’t get too deep with my lyrics shouldn’t make me feel like I don’t do a good job. I’m flowing with it and I know I’m doing a good job. I think people might take things way too seriously. I just want people to connect to what I’ve done.”

Good thing, then, that he’s down with the people almost every night.

“Clubs are my life. I’m out like five nights a week,” he admits. “I don’t think anything shapes my music as much.”

Cazwell’s music is club-based, with slick danceable beats and raps that flow well over his groove. He’s a throwback to actual disco from its heyday. Cazwell and his team cleverly sidestep the detachment of DJ-induced techno and house and deliver reliable music to dance to.

“DJing has influenced my music and lyrics,” he says. “To me it’s more about the hook and lyrics. I think people don’t wanna think so much. That’s what I’m hearing in clubs. People just want to dance.”

With a big life in the circuit and club scene, Cazwell seems to have a very un-Lohan like air. He describes himself as a closet health nut and begins discussing his crash regimen to get cut for “Ice Cream Truck:” He swears by liquid meals and cleansing protocols.

“That’s changed my life the most,” he says. “I see results really quick and I’ve lost most of my cravings for processed foods — unless I’m stoned. Plus, I go to the gym as much as I can.”

Regardless of his boisterous persona and ability to get shirtless faster than Matthew McConaughey at a paparazzi convention, Cazwell is just a timid soul. Or so he says.

“The thing that would surprise most people about me is that I’m really, really shy,” he says. “People don’t expect that and sometimes I think they feel like I’m not making an effort. But, yeah, I’m painfully shy. “

He assures that won’t be an issue at Thursday’s meet and greet after his show at Station 4 — he knows how to turn it on. Mostly, he looks forward to meeting the fans he gained with his last show in Dallas at minc back in 2007. Plus, being in a different city than the Big Apple gives him some new perspective.

“Sometimes I take it for granted that I live in New York City where all these gay guys know the words,” he says. “I think they gain a sense of entitlement, but in a good way. I want people to feel like that. I hate to sound corny but it’s cooler to be gay than straight and I want people to get a taste of that.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 24, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas

Concert Notice: Homo hip-hopper Cazwell will bring his ‘Ice Cream Truck’ to S4 on Sept. 30

Caven has just announced that the “Ice Cream Truck” is heading to Station 4 next month. And by that, I mean hip-pop homo hottie Cazwell is coming to town. The last time we saw Cazwell in town was at the now-defunct minc in Exposition Park. The rapper-singer’s hit is big on the dance floor which I’m sure has NOTHING to do with the above video.

He was first touted as the gay Eminem, but instead I think he’s in his own league layering outrageous raps over dance music. He’s more fun than Eminem with other songs like “I Seen Beyonce at Burger King” and “All Over Your Face” from his 2009 album Watch My Mouth.

He performs an 18-and-up show at S4 on Sept. 30 at midnight. After his performance, he’s gonna stick around for a Meet and Greet. Maybe he’ll have a Bomb Pop just for you.

Cazwell

—  Rich Lopez