Dallas mayoral candidate drops out of race

Jim Moore

Jim Moore, an attorney with an Oak Lawn-based practice, announced Monday that he is dropping out of the race to replace Tom Leppert as mayor of Dallas. Moore said the decision was based purely on finances; he said he doesn’t have the money to mount a successful campaign and is “not likely to raise the funds needed within the next 90 days.”

Moore also said he is endorsing former Dallas Police Chief David Kunkle for mayor.

Here is the full text of his announcement:

“At this time, I am withdrawing as a candidate for Dallas Mayor. This has been a very difficult decision for me and my campaign team, particularly in light of the support I have received from so many. This was a business decision based on finances — we simply don’t have the money it will take to win this election, and are not likely to raise the funds needed within the next 90 days.

“I thank my friends & supporters, trusted advisors, and my campaign team. I have truly enjoyed meeting Dallasites from all parts of our great city during the past 7 months campaigning. I am deeply grateful and humbled by the support I have received from citizens all across Dallas.

“My utmost hope is that the voters will challenge our City Council and the next mayor to work for the betterment of Dallas and to do right by the citizens. We need to hold our civic leaders accountable for economic development, completion of the Inland Port project, the Trinity River corridor project, improved services, and increased support for Dallas schools. Let us work on existing issues facing us now before we build new hotels at taxpayer expense or toll roads that our levees won’t support.

“At this time, I am announcing my support of former Dallas Police Chief David Kunkle in his bid for Dallas Mayor, and am asking my friends to support him as well.

“My passion for the City of Dallas is greater than ever, and I am committed to staying active in civic affairs.  Because Dallas deserves Moore! “

The only candidate to file in the mayoral race since the filing period began Monday, Feb. 14, is current District 12 Councilman Ron Natinsky. However, Kunkle, Dallas Parks Board President Mike Rawlings and E. Edward Okpa, owner of the commercial real estate consulting firm Integrated Valuation, have all said they plan to run.

The deadline to file is March 14.

—  admin

Equality Texas is looking for a few good board members, especially from places like Dallas

Last week we told you that in the face of staffing cuts, Equality Texas plans to rely heavily on active, volunteer board members to assist with lobbying duties during the state legislative session that began today.

Well, it turns out that the group is also looking for a few additional board members, and particularly people of color from Dallas, El Paso, Lubbock and Corpus Christi. An ad posted Monday on SmartBrief Jobs notes that Equality Texas board members serve a maximum of three two-year terms and have a fundraising requirement of $7,500 in 2011, which will increase to $10,000 in 2012:

This is a challenging opportunity with an emerging organization dedicated to the most compelling civil rights issue of our time. It may appeal to a younger person whose career would be enhanced by association with a high profile organization that can effect social change, as well as by the opportunity for building relationships with other business and civic leaders who serve as Directors. Alternatively, this might appeal to a more senior executive who has a strong personal conviction about the importance of addressing these issues in the state of Texas.

To read the full ad or apply, go here.

—  John Wright

Dutton wins Bank of America ‘local hero’ award

Samaritan House head honored for work in housing people with AIDS, other chronic illnesses

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer taffet@dallasvoice.com

Steven Dutton, president and CEO of Samaritan House in Fort Worth, has been named a Bank of America local hero. The award is given to five people in each of 45 cities across the country.

Winners were chosen by a committee made of local leadership from Bank of America, previous grant recipients and other civic leaders, according to Mike Pavell, Fort Worth market president of the bank.

Samaritan House provides affordable, quality housing to low-income individuals and families including those affected by HIV.

“We were impressed with Steve not only because of his tireless pursuit to develop housing for persons who are homeless, ex-offenders, and those with chronic illness and disabilities,” said Pavell, “but because he speaks with residents of his program all day, showing them respect and care and enables them to become the strongest voice in their own recovery.”

Since joining the agency in 1996, the focus has shifted from hospice care to long-term support and even transitional housing. Soon after joining Samaritan House, the agency moved from the Northside into a 32-bed former nursing home southeast of downtown.

Dutton oversaw the new facility grow to 60 beds.

When the Villages at Samaritan House opened in 2006 with 66 apartments, they began serving 375 people, many affected with HIV.

In addition to providing housing, they help with finding employment opportunities for residents. Through a partnership with Z’s Café inside the Fort Worth Community Arts Center, 15 residents are employed.

“Z Café is going great,” Dutton said.

He called that project one of Samaritan House’s greatest successes because it has led to other restaurants in the area who are looking for new employees to call.

“One of our ambitions is to multiply the number of job opportunities,” he said.

He said it was a joy to see people who haven’t had a job in years after their first day at work.

“But it’s not just restaurants,” he said. “Others are working in maintenance and construction.”

The Local Heroes award comes with a $5,000 grant that Dutton directed to Samaritan House. He earmarked the money to an HIV prevention campaign.

“Every week, the number of persons contacting us increases,” he said. “Most new residents are under the age of 24.”

As part of that campaign, he has scheduled a screening of the film, And the Band Played On Sunday, Nov. 7 with the Lone Star Film Society. Bob Ray Sanders will introduce the movie. He said that with the average age of his new residents so young, most had never seen the HBO film.

Dennis Bishop, Lone Star Film Society director, was vice president of production at HBO when they made the film. He will be on hand at the screening to answer questions and talk about how difficult it was to bring this controversial movie to TV.

Dutton noted that they will hold one of their biggest fundraisers next week. On Wednesday, Nov. 10, they will present their Out of the Box fundraiser.

The luncheon will be held at the Fort Worth Sheraton and there is no cost to attend.

While the luncheon is free, reservations are required so they can plan the number of lunches to provide.

Reservations can be made by phone.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 5, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens