‘Democrat’ doesn’t always equal ‘gay-friendly’

Justin Nichols

Comments by Bexar County Democratic Party chair — and the response to them — shows LGBTs have to work across lines of race, party to make progress

JUSTIN NICHOLS | Special Contributor

Much has been said about the chairman of the Bexar County Democratic Party, Dan Ramos, who last month made headlines with a rant in which he called LGBT people“Nazis” and “termites.”

But as things develop, we shouldn’t just write Ramos off as one county chairman gone crazy. Lessons can be learned here about politics, race and the fight for equality.

On April 5, the Bexar County Democratic Party precinct chairs held two meetings, both claiming to be official. The San Antonio Express-News reported that the larger meeting, from which Ramos was absent, had about 75 precinct chairs that voted to put Ramos on trial for rule violations.

The smaller meeting, which Ramos attended, was comprised almost exclusively of Hispanic precinct chairs who gave him, reportedly, a “hero’s welcome.”

In March, a local news survey showed that only 54 percent of viewers believed that Ramos should resign his post — a far cry from unanimous agreement.

This got me thinking: Is there a quiet but significant group of people who aren’t that upset with Ramos?

Ramos’ comments have become increasingly racially charged. Further, Ramos has maintained his position opposing same-sex marriage and gay adoption represents the true sentiments of Bexar County residents.

What if Ramos is right, and what if race is a bigger player than initially thought?

The Pew Hispanic Center, the leader in Latino research, reported that 56 percent of Hispanics oppose gay marriage, compared to only 42 percent of non-Hispanics; 43 percent of Hispanics believe that abortion should be legal compared to 60 percent of non-Hispanics.

These numbers are in stark contrast to a 2010 Gallup poll showing 56 percent and 87 percent of Democrats support, respectively, gay marriage and some form of legal abortion.

According to Pew, Hispanics tend to identify with the Democratic Party 66 percent of the time, double the rate by which they identify with the Republican Party. And, the Latino population is the fastest-growing minority in the country — seeing a 56 percent increase from 2000 to 2010 in Southern states.

What this means is that the fastest-growing population, which overwhelmingly supports the Democratic Party, significantly breaks with the Democratic platform on issues like gay rights and women’s right to choose.

So maybe, the conflict in Bexar County is just a sample of more intra-party disputes to come as the Latino populations grows and realizes more leadership positions in the Democratic Party.

To the people ready to accuse me of lumping all Latinos into one big bag: Cool down, I’m not.

I’m suggesting that, as the Hispanic community becomes larger and more politically active — flexing its muscle on issues like immigration and education — we shouldn’t assume that a “D” or “R” next to someone’s name automatically reveals their position on gay rights.

As a community, we need to be reaching out to all communities, and we should never assume that one group is automatically in our corner.

The leaders of Stonewall Democrats of San Antonio are right: Dan Ramos is a dinosaur who will soon be extinct.

But I caution against assuming that when dinosaurs die there will automatically be political oil to drill. The numbers show that is not guaranteed.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition April 8, 2011.


—  John Wright

AUDIO: Bexar County Democratic Party Chairman Dan Ramos on gay Democrats

Dan Ramos on Stonewall Democrats, homosexuality by gharman

Daniel Graney, president of the Texas Stonewall Democratic Caucus, has been doing a great job keeping us posted on the Dan Ramos situation. If you’ll remember, Ramos is the chairman of the Bexar County Democratic Party who recently compared gay Democrats to “termites” and the “fuckin’ Nazi Party.” Just today, the San Antonio Current posted some audio from the interview in which Ramos’ originally made his anti-gay comments — in response to Ramos’ allegations that the newspaper misrepresented what he said. Also, after the jump are several statements condemning Ramos forwarded by Graney over the last few days, including from state representatives, a Congressman, the San Antonio mayor and the Tarrant County Stonewall Democrats.

—  John Wright

Bexar County Dem party chair insults LGBTs

Omar Narvaez

Ramos resists calls to resign after calling Stonewall Democrats  ‘Nazis’ and ‘termites’

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer
taffet@dallasvoice.com

Democratic Party officials across Texas are calling for the resignation of Bexar County Democratic Party Chairman Dan Ramos after he called Stonewall Democrats “Nazis” and “termites.”

On Thursday, March 17, Ramos held a press conference where he was expected to resign. Instead, according to Sam Sanchez of QSanAntonio.com who attended the press conference, Ramos hurled new epithets.

Ramos said gays are like “white termites who have infiltrated the party much like termites infiltrate your house.”

He called Texas Democratic Party Chair Boyd Richie a “racist bastard” and an idiot who is advised by gay people.

Currently there are no rules in place for removing someone from a party position for incompetence, according to Dallas County Democratic Party Executive Director Steve Tillery.

“If he had publicly supported a Republican, he could be thrown out of office,” Tillery said. “But not for just being a dumbass.”

“He’s just ignoring calls for resignation,” said Dan Graney, president of Stonewall Democrats of Texas. Graney is from San Antonio.

The Bexar County Democratic Party has been in turmoil for several years according to Graney. The former treasurer was indicted recently for siphoning more than $200,000 in party funds.

That money came from the state to run the 2008 primary election.

The county chair stepped down in Dec. 2009, Graney said, but not because of the missing money. He said she left to run for higher office and was not implicated in the scandal despite her signature appearing on checks.

Graney’s husband Roberto Flores replaced her and served as interim county chair from Dec. 2009 through the May 2010 election that Ramos won.

Flores did not run for a full term against Ramos. He died in September 2010.

Graney said that Stonewall endorsed Ramos’ opponent in the election for county chair last year, but that Ramos sought the group’s endorsement.

Stonewall Democrats of San Antonio is among the largest Democratic clubs in that city and the second-largest Stonewall group in Texas after Dallas.

“He [Ramos] came to our meeting and answered our questions,” Graney said. “He made statements that he doesn’t condone discrimination.”

But Graney said that Ramos has a long history of divisiveness.

“He [Ramos] was an ACLU board member and was divisive there,” he said.

Graney said that the good that’s coming out of this is all the support Stonewall is getting from around the state.

Stonewall Democrats of Dallas president Omar Narvaez said response to the incident shows how far the LGBT community has come in Texas.

“We didn’t have to ask for anything,” he said. “It was already done.”

Narvaez said that before Stonewall even asked for the party’s support, Richie had already called for Ramos’ resignation.

Narvaez said the state party was just following its platform of inclusion.

The 2010 platform states, “We believe in and support repeal of discriminatory laws and policies against members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community.”

“It’s part of who we are,” Narvaez said.

At their monthly meeting, members of Stonewall Democrats of Dallas added their official voice to the chorus of organizations condemning Ramos and unanimously passed a resolution calling for him to step down.

Ramos made his original comments in reaction to legislation filed by San Antonio Democrat Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer that would enable a state party executive committee to remove a county chair for misconduct or incompetence.

Stonewall of San Antonio had criticized Ramos’ fundraising efforts and his attempts to change precinct level leadership, ignoring party rules and committees. Among other things, Ramos called Stonewall “90 percent white, blue-eyed and Anglo.” Narvaez, who is Hispanic, took offense. He said leadership in six Stonewall groups in Texas, including San Antonio Stonewall co-chair Eduardo Juarez, are also Hispanic.

The Dallas County Democratic Party called on Ramos to resign. In a statement they said, “His hateful, bigoted comments have no place in the Democratic Party. We are a party of inclusiveness that supports and promotes equality, diversity, and tolerance.” Dallas County chair Darlene Ewing and members of the State Democratic Executive Committee signed the letter.

In building his case against Ramos, Richie accused him of a series of violations in addition to his “bigoted attitudes.” He said that Ramos “consistently refused to follow the Bexar County Democratic Party Rules and the Texas Democratic Party Rules” keeping the county party “in a state of turmoil.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition March 18, 2011.

—  John Wright

Stonewall Dems of Dallas responds to Ramos

Omar Narvaez, president of Stonewall Democrats of Dallas, sent over the below resolution responding to recent statements by Bexar County Democratic Party Chairman Dan Ramos, who last week compared gays to “termites” and Stonewall to the “Nazi Party.” As we noted this morning, Ramos followed up with another anti-gay rant in which he said being gay is “not natural” and compared it to being born with a polio leg. Narvaez said the resolution was approved unanimously by Stonewall’s members at Tuesday night’s meeting:

Whereas, the Texas Democratic Party Platform supports action against all forms of discrimination and specifically calls for the repeal of discriminatory laws and policies against members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community; and

Whereas, the honor of serving as County Chair in the Democratic Party in the State of Texas is accompanied by the solemn responsibility to uphold the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Constitution without equivocation; and

Whereas, the Bexar County Democratic Chair Dan Ramos has gone on record describing the gay-rights movement as “very sinister”, the Stonewall Democrats as “termites” that “managed to get their people in key positions” in the Bexar County Democratic Party, and other reprehensible characterizations; and

Whereas, the unanimously elected Texas Democratic Party Chair Boyd Richie and many Dallas County Democratic Party officials have publicly called upon Bexar County Democratic Chair Dan Ramos to apologize or resign to no effect; and

Whereas, it is incumbent upon us as both Democrats and staunch defenders of equality for all people under the law including the LGBT community; therefore be it

Resolved, that the Stonewall Democrats of Dallas County join the chorus of voices from San Antonio, Rio Grande Valley, Houston, Austin and elsewhere in this great state of Texas to call for the resignation of Dan Ramos as Bexar County Democratic Party Chair.

—  John Wright

Election 2010 • Republican gains could cause Dems redistricting woes

Dallas County stays blue despite a wave of Republican red sweeping across the rest of the state, nation

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer taffet@dallasvoice.com

U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson
ANOTHER TERM | U.S. Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson makes an appearance at the county Democratic Election Night party. Johnson, the only Dallas-area Democrat in Congress, easily defeated Tea Party favorite Steve Broden on Tuesday. (David Taffet/Dallas Voice)

Although statewide results favored Republicans, Democrats swept all countywide races in Dallas County. The larger majority of Republicans in the legislature, however, will affect redistricting and could embolden some to file anti-gay legislation.

“Dallas County will still be a Democratic County,” said State Rep. Royce West at the election watch party at the American Airlines Arena on Nov. 2.

While pleased with the results throughout the county, Dallas County Democratic Party chair Darlene Ewing said her worry was redistricting.

New census figures will be reported in December. Then the newly elected legislature will redistrict state and federal legislative seats based on the new figures. She expects the state Democratic Party to file a challenge to the new boundaries should they be drawn to heavily favor Republicans.

In the U.S. House of Representatives, Texas should gain a seat. Eddie Bernice Johnson’s district is packed with a large number of the county’s Democrats, contributing to her 50-point margin of victory. Should the new district be carved partially from that area, the next congress might include a second Democrat from North Texas.

Should her district remain untouched, the area will likely elect another Republican.

Texas state House and Senate districts will also be reapportioned. Current district lines kept six districts safely in Democratic hands. Those races were unchallenged by the Republicans but made the rest of the area’s races remained uncompetitive for Democrats.

Ewing said that in 2000, the Justice Department appointees who reviewed redistricting plans were Republican. But no longer.

“This time they’re on our side,” Ewing said.

“We have more recourse with a Democrat in the White House,” said Stonewall Democrats of Dallas President Erin Moore.

Moore believes the Justice Department will look at the new map more critically than they had in the past. Redistricting should reflect neighborhoods, and that gerrymandering is done to get one party or the other elected, she said.

“With Republicans winning, we know they’ll draw some really squiggly lines to get what they need to win again,” said Moore.

Moore also worried about anti-LGBT bills that would become more likely to pass with a larger Republican majority. She said anti-adoption bills could be filed and anti-bullying laws would be less likely to pass.

“Numbers bring strength and confidence,” she said. “And they’ve been emboldened.

Within the Democratic Party, the number of delegates each state sends to the national convention is determined, in part, by the number of votes cast for the Democrat in the most recent gubernatorial race. She said more ballots were cast for Bill White this year than for Chris Bell in 2006.

In this election, White and other Democrats did much better in Dallas than across most of the rest of the state.

Of the straight party ballots cast, 53 percent went to the Democratic Party. By contrast, almost twice as many Republican straight party ballots were cast in Tarrant County than Democratic ballots.

In statewide races, White received 55 percent of the vote in the governor’s race in Dallas County. Across the state, Rick Perry won the election with 55 percent. The vote in Tarrant County reflected the statewide vote.

Dr. Elba Garcia and a supporter.
Dr. Elba Garcia and a supporter.

Other statewide races were all won by Republicans but were fairly evenly split in Dallas County. Republican Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst held a 2,000-vote edge over Democrat Linda Chavez-Thompson in Dallas. In other races, the Democratic challengers held a slight edge over the Republican incumbents across the county.

All contested Dallas County judgeships were won by Democrats. Winners took nothing for granted in their races, however.

“Somebody once told me there are two ways to run for office,” said Judge Carl Ginsberg. “Unopposed or scared.”

He said he got his message out and won with more than 52 percent of the vote, higher than most of the other winners. A number of Republican voters told him that they crossed over to vote for him.

Democrats also retained district attorney, county clerk, district clerk, and county judge and picked up a county commissioner’s seat.

However, in state House of Representatives races, Democrats lost all contested races in Dallas County. Two out of three Democratic incumbents also lost in Tarrant County. None of those races is a countywide contest.

Those losing their elections in Dallas included Carol Kent, Robert Miklos, Kirk England and Allen Vaught. In Tarrant County, Paula Pierson and Chris Turner lost their seats while LGBT community ally Lon Burnham retained his. Burnham has co-authored anti-bullying legislation.

“I think it was the national sentiment that hurt,” said Pete Schulte who challenged Republican incumbent Dan Branch for the House seat that includes parts of Oak Lawn and East Dallas.

“We lost a lot of good reps tonight,” Schulte said. “We fought a good campaign, but when federal politics takes center stage, it’s an uphill battle to combat that locally.”

Moore credits the Democratic win in Dallas County on the coordinated campaign of the county party, the get out the vote effort and a massive calling operation. But she called the results, “too close for comfort.”

Weather affected the outcome, Moore said. Traditionally, Republicans make up a majority of the early vote and Democrats are more likely to cast their ballots on Election Day. Rain affects turnout and more than three inches fell on Tuesday.

Elba Garcia was more upbeat in her assessment of the outcome. She beat 16-year incumbent Ken Mayfield by 5 percent.

She said voters spoke loudly about the change they want.

“We need this county to move forward,” she said. “Voters are tired of the finger pointing.”

Garcia said her experience in city government will benefit the county as she helps find ways for different entities together. Once elected, it doesn’t matter what party she ran on, she said, reflecting her experience as a city council member. The city council is elected in non-partisan elections.

Everyone on the Commissioners Court needs to work together on healthcare, public safety, education and economic development, Garcia said.
“Government is not exactly a business,” she said. “But it needs to be run professionally.”

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 5, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Lt. governor candidates low key on LGBT issues

Dewhurst lists fiscal responsibility as a top issue; Chavez-Thompson says she is focusing on education

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer taffet@dallasvoice.com

ON THE ISSUES | Although the candidates for Texas lieutenant governor have been relatively quiet on LGBT issues, a few key statements give an indication on where they stand. Republican incumbent David Dewhurst, left, chimed in to help cancel a student production of the gay-themed play “Corpus Christi” last spring. Linda Chavez-Thompson, the Democratic challenger, Tweeted her support for equality when a judge overturned California’s Proposition 8.

LGBT issues are not playing a big role in the race for Texas lieutenant governor between Republican incumbent David Dewhurst and Democratic challenger Linda Chavez-Thompson.

Neither candidate addresses LGBT issues on their website. But while neither campaign returned phone calls from Dallas Voice seeking comment for this story, a Tweet and a recent incident give an indication of their positions.

Dewhurst played a role in last spring’s controversy over the production of the play “Corpus Christi” at Tartleton State University in Stephenville.

“No one should have the right to use government funds or institutions to portray acts that are morally reprehensible to the vast majority of Americans,” Dewhurst said in a written statement.

In later praising the university for canceling the performance, he claimed he was “a strong defender of free speech.”

Chavez-Thompson has taken a more LGBT-friendly stance.

After the Proposition 8 decision was handed down in California, she Tweeted her reaction to the ruling: “So glad to hear Prop 8 was overturned today. It was discrimination at its worst. I will keep fighting for equality for all Texans.”

Dallas County Democratic Party Chair Darling Ewing said she believes Chavez-Thompson would be an ally to the LGBT community.

“Linda comes from an immigrant family, a poor family,” said Ewing. “On equality, she’ll be right on the issues.”

Dewhurst has been lieutenant governor since 2003 and is running for a third term. He was first elected to statewide office in 1998 as commissioner of the General Land Office of Texas.

On his website, Dewhurst prominently displays a “Petition to Repeal Obamacare” directly under his “Take Action” call for volunteers for his campaign.

Under a pull down list of issues, health care is first. While he claims that an overwhelming majority of people oppose the “2,000-plus page, $1.2 trillion, health care overhaul” and estimates the new law will add $27 billion in costs to taxpayers, he proposes no solution to the lack of health coverage by Texans.

“He isn’t in favor of health care,” Ewing said. “He’s only interested in not paying for it.”

Dewhurst’s other top issues are fiscal responsibility, border security and property rights. He believes the federal government has not stopped the flow of illegal drugs and immigrants into Texas, and he says Texas has stepped in to enhance border security. He does not, however, propose an Arizona-type immigration law for the state.

Chavez-Thompson lists jobs and education as her top issues.

“The state has dropped the ball on education,” Ewing said. “It’s all about saving a buck. They’ve made college education a luxury. The cost of a college education today is ridiculous.”

Chavez-Thompson also addresses the health care debate on her website, saying, “Today, rising health care costs has forced too many Texas families to go without insurance.”

Chavez-Thompson spent most of her career working her way up through union ranks. When she was chosen to serve as the executive vice president of the AFL-CIO, she was the first woman and the first person of color to hold that position.

President Bill Clinton appointed Chavez-Thompson to serve on his Race Advisory Board and on the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities. Today, she is vice chair of the Democratic National Committee.

“I think what she brings us is a workingman’s perspective,” Ewing said. “Because of her union history, she brings bargaining skills that would bring groups together.”

Local Republicans did not return calls or offered no comment for this article.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 17, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

White vs. Perry: Comparing the candidates on LGBT issues

Incumbent Republican faces former Democratic Houston mayor in race for Texas governor’s office

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer taffet@dallasvoice.com

Bill White, Rick Perry
IN THIS CORNER … | Democrats say LGBT voters should back former Houston Mayor Bill White, left, who has said he supports same-sex civil unions and opposed Texas’ anti-gay-marriage constitutional amendment. Republicans say that LGBT people who care about the economy should vote for incumbent Gov. Rick Perry, even though he pushed for passage of the marriage amendment.

Labor Day is the traditional kick-off of election season. This weekend, campaigning goes into high gear as voters begin paying more attention to the candidates competing in the November races.

The governor’s race pitting incumbent Rick Perry against former Houston Mayor Bill White is the Texas’ most high profile contest and an important one for the state’s LGBT community.

Perry came into office in January 2001 when George W. Bush resigned to become president. He has been elected twice since then and is seeking his third full term. He already is the longest-serving governor in Texas history and is currently the longest serving governor in the United States.

In May 2001, Perry signed the James L. Byrd Hate Crimes bill into law after years of opposition to the law by Gov. Bush. Since then, Perry’s record of LGBT issues has swung to opposite direction.

Under his tenure and with his support, an anti-same-sex-marriage amendment was added to the state constitution in 2005. But bills restricting adoption by gays and lesbians have not passed and Perry generally stayed out of that legislative debate.

White supports anti-bullying legislation that will be the top priority for Equality Texas in the upcoming legislature. That measure, first introduced in the legislature by Rep. Harryette Ehrhardt in the 1990s, has not come to the floor for a vote in past sessions.

Dallas County Republican Party Chairman Jonathan Neerman said that education is at the top of Perry’s priorities. He said that a good public education system is important to everyone, including the LGBT community, because it benefits the entire state.

Dallas County Democratic Party Chair Darlene Ewing agrees and points out how low Texas’ public education system ranks nationally. She said Texas has the highest dropout rate in the country.

“If they can’t have vouchers for their private schools, they’ll just destroy the public school system,” she said. “[Perry] sees it as a property tax burden.”

She said she believes White would be good for Texas and good for the LGBT community.

“I think he could do a lot,” said Ewing. “He believes in equality for everyone. Republicans use gay equality as a wedge issue.”

Ewing said that she believes that as governor, White would disregard sexual orientation in appointments, for example.

“I’ve heard him say that every citizen is entitled to protection,” she said. “He has a track record of working with all people in Houston.”

This week, the Texas Tribune reported Perry scored points by deriding the LGBT community.

“There is still a land of opportunity, friends — it’s called Texas,” Perry said. “We’re creating more jobs than any other state in the nation. … Would you rather live in a state like this, or in a state where a man can marry a man?”

He didn’t explain what one thing had to do with the other or address studies that show that same-sex marriage actually creates jobs.

Ewing dismissed the statement as nothing more than a “Let’s get the crazies all riled up” attempt.

But in this race, Dallas Log Cabin Republicans President Rob Schlein is focusing on Texas’ pro-business climate, with low taxes that have kept the state strong.

“I think the proof is in the economy,” said Schlein. “We have the best economy in the country and I think it has to do with conservative governance.”

Neerman said the election would hinge on the economy. He said LGBT voters would look for the same thing as straight voters.

“Who is the best man to lead the state in job creation, getting the economy moving and keeping spending under control,” he said. “This election will be about pocketbook issues.”

He pointed out that Perry angered many people in his base by not supporting an Arizona-type immigration law. Soon after that bill was signed into law, Perry said that a similar law wouldn’t work in Texas.

“He’s an ambassador for the state and he does a great job at that,” Neerman said.

Jonathan Neerman and Jennifer Allen
Jonathan Neerman and Jennifer Allen

But while White has attended Stonewall Democrats events across the state, Perry has not courted support of that group’s Republican counterparts.

“I’d like to see [Perry] do what another Republican governor did in Utah and host a reception for Log Cabin,” Dallas Log Cabin Republicans President Rob Schlein said. “Include us in the conversation.”

Bill White has said he supports civil unions rather than marriage. In 2005, he opposed the marriage ban proposition that became law. On his website, he has no official statements about equality for the LGBT community.

Under issues, the Perry campaign simply lists “Protecting Traditional Marriage,” without explanation, under a heading “social conservative.” The 2005 marriage ban remains in place. That is the only reference to anything gay.

The Texas Republican platform, however, goes into more detail. It calls for outlawing child custody by gay parents and only allowing supervised visitation if called for by court order.

The platform advocates outlawing adoption by gays and lesbians, disqualifying gays and lesbians from military service and excluding gays and lesbians and persons with infectious disease from the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Since being gay or lesbian isn’t a disability, this implies that any gay or lesbian person who is disabled would be disqualified from the law. Infectious disease refers directly to persons with HIV who are covered by the act.

Stonewall Democrats of Dallas President Erin Moore called the Republican Party platform reprehensible.

“As head of the Texas Republican Party, Perry had to have signed off on it,” she said. “Bill White has been a friend of the LGBT community as mayor of Houston and will be as governor.”

Schlein said, “As a practical matter, politicians do not govern by the platform.”

He noted that at their recent meeting, Texas Young Republicans unanimously called for removing the anti-gay planks from the platform.

Neerman agreed and thought this was the direction many social conservatives were moving. He cited Ted Olsen, who fought California’s Proposition 8 in court recently and won, as an example.

Dallas Stonewall Young Democrats Political Director Jennifer Allen gave a different example of why she is supporting White. She said she was impressed by White’s response after Hurricane Katrina.

“When the national government wasn’t doing anything about it, Bill White as mayor of Houston organized the city to provide housing, food and medical care when people were fleeing New Orleans,” she said.

Neerman and Schlein argue that Texas has not been affected by the recession as badly as other parts of the country and both credit Perry for that. They think Perry deserves LGBT support because economic issues are what this community is focused on.

Ewing argued that White would be great for Texas business and warned about four more years of Perry.

“Perry’s full of crap,” she said.

“He claims to have balanced the budget, but he took money from the feds to plug up the hole. When he panders to the secession nuts and then wants to sell the roads off to foreign companies, follow the money.”

A current Rasmussen poll has Perry at 49 percent and White at 41 percent.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition September 3, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens