Disclosure: The gay interview

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Guy and Howard Lawrence, the brothers who make up the duo Disclosure.

English dance prodigy duo Disclosure isn’t simply aware that club music is steeped in queer culture; they’re inspired by it. The Grammy-nominated duo, brothers Howard and Guy Lawrence, is still lighting up the charts with songs off their debut, Settle (recently released as a deluxe edition), which, according to its creators, leans heavily on the unique gay roots found in house music.

Makes sense, then, that they’re getting their groove on with Madonna. If chummy Instagram photos with the legend are any indication, presumably they’ll be working with the icon on her next album. Word broke after our Chris Azzopardi spoke with Guy for this gay press exclusive (Howard couldn’t be reached for our scheduled interview, so like a good brother, Guy stepped in for him last-minute). Though he didn’t acknowledge Madonna at the time, the 23-year-old did reveal what other pop icon he’s drunk in love with: Beyoncé. And more news since the interview? Disclosure will bring a DJ set to Dallas this December as headliners of the EDM festival Lights All Night.

Dallas Voice: How much has the gay community influenced your sound?  Guy Lawrence: Honestly, the history of the music that we take influence from, like house and garage, obviously originated in gay clubs like The Warehouse in Chicago and Paradise Garage [in New York City]. I don’t go to gay clubs now, but I feel like gay clubs just seem to be very forward-thinking, in terms of music anyway, and they’re always pushing boundaries. If you look back at the last 25 years or so, they’re playing the most original, creative stuff.

The gay community is often recognized as having its finger on the pulse. You hear people say we know when something is gonna be big before it actually is. From what I’ve seen, I would agree. I don’t only look to the gay community for where I’m gonna go next, but generally, London is such a step ahead of most places in the world musically, especially with dance music. Wherever we travel, producers and DJs are always looking at London and the UK to see what’s coming up next. That’s really why I love living here. We just have such a great buzzing young producer community going on over here — it’s such a good vibe.

You say you don’t go to gay clubs much now, but it sounds like you have. Was that for research purposes?  I used to go to Brighton a lot. It’s on the south coast of England, a five-minute drive from where I used to live. It was cool — there’s a big gay community in Brighton. I can’t really remember which were gay clubs or not, but it didn’t really matter — there was always great DJs playing at them. I used to drive down there and there was definitely some research involved. When I was really into dubstep and grime and that kind of thing, I’d go down and slowly but surely everyone started playing house music and garage music. It was just a really good place to go out, especially when I was just turning 18 and wanting to learn about dance music, where it came from and the history. It was the perfect place for that.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Skrillex, Disclosure announced for 2-day EDM fest, Lights All Night

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British DJ duo Disclosure

Famed DJ Skrillex will launch the annual Lights All Night electronic dance music festival in December, with the team of Disclosure performing a DJ set, Armin van Buuren and a yet-to-be-named artist also headlining.

Since its inception, Lights All Night has featured top DJs in its lineups, including Tiesto, deadmau5 and Calvin Harris.

The two-day festival, which takes place right after Christmas, will fill the Dallas Convention Center. Early-bird tickets are available here.

We’ll have an interview with the guys who make up Disclosure next week.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Uh, no … this doesn’t really interest me …

This is the intro to a press release I just received. What amazes me is how unamazing this disclosure is… doesn’t everybody?

What do celebrities Kim Kardashian, Matthew McConaughey, Nicolas Cage and Raquel Welch all have in common? They all have either recently purchased or are selling their homes — and each of their homes have wood flooring. If this is something that is of interest to you, the full press release is below.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

NOM Files Yet Another Lawsuit Challenging Disclosure Laws

As part of its radical nationwide efforts to dismantle state laws that provide transparency about who is funding political campaigns, the National Organization for Marriage this week filed suit in Rhode Island seeking to have their disclosure laws ruled unconstitutional.  The suit comes the same week as NOM lost in federal court in Minnesota on a similar case.

The case – National Organization for Marriage v. John Daluz – was filed in U.S. District Court in Rhode Island on September 21.  Daluz is the named defendant in his official capacity as Vice Chairman of the state board of elections.

This new lawsuit brought by NOM’s lawyers is similar to other public disclosure challenges they have made across the country including in Minnesota and New York.  In Maine NOM remains under investigation by the Maine Ethics Commission for failing to register with the state as a ballot question committee and disclose the donors to its campaign to overturn Maine’s marriage equality law in 2009.  In Washington State, NOM’s lawyers fought the state’s public records law all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court – and lost.  A federal court in California has similarly rejected NOM’s efforts to hide its donors in the wake of Proposition 8.

Human Rights Campaign Vice President of Communications and Marketing Fred Sainz remarked in a release: “One thing’s for sure – NOM feels like they have something to hide. In yet another state, NOM is trying to eviscerate the fair and open process that governs election spending in this country.  What lengths won’t they go to in order to shield themselves from public scrutiny?”


Human Rights Campaign | HRC Back Story

—  John Wright

Judge Delivers Split Ruling in NOM Maine Donor Disclosure Case

Nom_maine A U.S. District Court has ruled in the Maine case seeking disclosure of the names of donors to the successful effort by the National Organization for Marriage (NOM) to repeal the state's marriage equality law:

"Saying a state law requiring that the names of donors be disclosed within a certain time frame is 'unconstitutionally vague,' U.S. District Judge D. Brock Hornby nevertheless said the request by the state Commission on Governmental Ethics and Election Practices that the National Organization for Marriage disclose names of donors who gave money to defeat a gay marriage law in Maine is not a burden on NOM’s freedom of speech.

But Hornby took shots at some of Maine’s campaign finance disclosure rules. The judge said rules requiring 24-hour disclosure of independent expenditures over 0 — not just before an election, but whenever they occur — 'has not been justified … is impermissably burdensome and cannot be enforced.'"

It's unclear from the article what happens next. Will update this post with any additional information…


Towleroad News #gay

—  John Wright