Music. Score!

THE BOI AND THE COWBOY | Generations collide when Cazwell, right, and Cowboy Jeff Olson of the Village People bring their very gay music to the Cotton Bowl on Thursday, Feb. 3.

Musicians including Cazwell and Jeff Olson of the Village People head to Texas for a big gay Super Bowl party — although neither is all that excited about the game

All’s well that Cazwell

Who knew it just takes a popsicle to rise to stardom? Just ask Katy Perry. Or Cazwell, whose colorful music video for “Ice Cream Truck” became the gay anthem of last summer. With hot dancers and sexualized frozen confections, it has an infectious beat and a sense of joy that combined to make it a huge hit for the artist.

Just don’t expect the Ice Cream Truck Boys to join Cazwell when he’s in town next week for XLV Party, a three-day event inside a 60,000-square-foot climate-controlled tent on the field of the Cotton Bowl. The festivities kick off with a super-gay night of entertainment on Thursday. And even with the likes of Lady Bunny, DJ Inferno and the iconic Village People sharing stage time, Cazwell plans to bring it.

Describing himself as what would result if Biggie Smalls ate Donna Summer, Cazwell has combined the energy of dance music with the soul of hip-hop for a fun, modern sound that is all about getting people to have fun and dance.

“I’m going to turn it out. It’s going to be a high-energy show,” he says. “I’m going to do a combination of my dance songs but I also just want to kick back and wrestle with some beats and some rhymes. I think people will get to know me a little better as an artist.”

XLV Party will mark Cazwell’s second appearance in Dallas in less than a year and he’s anxious to come back.

“I was in Dallas last summer. It was really, really good. I was very surprised by the turnout. I wasn’t expecting so many fans,” he says. “We did a meet-and-greet that lasted three hours.”

His fan base has grown exponentially since “Ice Cream Truck,” but he still remembers the days when even Lady Gaga couldn’t get a reaction from a New York crowd.

“We did a song together at a club called Family. She’d always been kind of eccentric, but really down-to-earth. We had this stage that was like the size of a door, but she took it seriously. She crammed two dancers up there and then I got up there and she said, ‘I’m going to throw you to the ground and ride you like I’m fucking you and the audience is going to go crazy,’” he recalls. The gimmick landed with a thud.

“Somewhere there’s footage of it, but I can’t find it. The funny thing about it is that we really didn’t get the reaction we thought we were going to get. Nobody knew who she was so they just kind of looked at us with their arms folded. Like great, here’s another club kid with a song. Six months later, everybody knew who Lady Gaga was.”

Cazwell has garnered a loyal following on the New York club scene and has broken out with hit songs like, “I Seen Beyonce at Burger King” and “All Over Your Face,” but “Ice Cream Truck” is really where things clicked with a larger audience. And it almost didn’t happen.

“I didn’t want to write a new song; I was feeling really lazy. But a friend was pressuring me,” he says. “I wrote it for this movie called Spork, which won a bunch of awards for the Tribeca Film Festival and is going nationwide in May. My friend said he wanted a beat that sounded like an ice cream truck. We did the whole thing in like 45 minutes. It was just really, really easy.”

He wasn’t going to do anything with it until his manager suggested he make a quick video “to the song to get my face out there. It made me think of summertime and the hot Latin guys in my neighborhood. We all know a bunch of guys, dancers from the club scene so we invited them all over. No one was paid. We’re all friends and they just wanted to be a part of it.”

The video become a sensation across Facebook and video sites like YouTube, and with it came legions of new fans. But that’s OK … for now.

“I think that right now I’m in a good time in my life because I think the people that come up to me are genuine fans. I think when you get more famous, people want to meet you just because you’re famous. That could get tedious. I’m sure people go up to Lady Gaga just because she’s Lady Gaga, not because they respect her music,” Cazwell says.

“I feel right now that people are being genuine with me. I hope they’re people I’ve had a positive effect on because when people tell me that, it really makes me feel really good.”

And as for his excitement over the Super Bowl? Well, not so much. Cazwell admits he’s not a football fan — or a fan of any sport for that matter.

“I’m not passionate about sports at all. I don’t get it. I see sports on the news and wonder how that’s a news story. It’s just a game!” he says.

That’s all right. We see him as more a concessions guy anyway … like, the ice cream truck.

— Steven Lindsey

Cowboy up

Despite the cheeky allure of the Village People, the concept band is nothing to laugh at. After 34 years, the quintessential disco band still gets audiences to do the “Y.M.C.A.” dance. A  Rolling Stone cover, a Walk of Fame star and million-selling albums are nothing to sniff at.

Jeff Olson jumped onboard after the peak of the Village People’s popularity in the late 1970s, but he’s still enjoying the ride three decades later.

“Our first and foremost obligation is to just entertain,” he says. “We are obligated to do it and I’d say we do it very well.”

As a VP veteran, Olson sounds less like a music star and more like an elder slacker. He has a relaxed, cool inflection as he talks up his favorite classic rock bands and will say “man” after most everything. He’s the kind of guy you could kill a few hours with, as long as a beer and maybe something to smoke are handy.

The People don’t talk much about the sexuality of its members, but it’s hard to ignore the impact the group had on the gay community in the ’70s.

After the band floundered in the ’80s when Olson joined to replace original VP Cowboy Randy Jones, the gay audience stuck around.

“I don’t think we’ve had any change with the gay fans. They have always been very loyal and we’re still very grateful about that,” he says. “We’ve done lots to increase our other fans but really, nobody gives a shoot. Who cares anymore about gay or straight thing? We’re on this earth for very short time.”

At 60, Olson feels great and is obviously in shape to do the dance moves, but if it were up to him, he’d stay home. Still, the fans drive him to keep entertaining.

“I hate being on the road,” he admits. “When you live out of a suitcase, so much sucks like trying to get through TSA these days. I love being home, but we really love what we do.”

Where each Village Person represented a distinctive male archetype of gay fantasy, Olson is coy about the popularity of his cowboy image — though as any weekend at the Round-Up Saloon would prove, cowboys are a sexy commodity in Dallas. Olson won’t say if his cowboy is more popular with the boys than the others, but he lets out what sounds like a proud chuckle.

“Honestly I do not know and I don’t care,” he says.” The audiences react differently to all of us. We’re introduced individually so the reaction changes all the time. It’s always all good.”

The irony of Olson coming with the Village People for the very gay night of the Super Bowl party is that sports and crowds aren’t his thing.

“Nah, I don’t follow football,” he says. “And you wanna know a secret? I’m paranoid about crowds. I don’t do well with them and I need space. I don’t like signing autographs because folks don’t do the things they should do as a human being. But one on one I’m good with.”

Despite getting a few things off his chest, Olson mostly wants to remind that the Village People don’t necessarily stand for anything … but they will make you dance.

— Rich Lopez

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition Jan. 28, 2011.

—  John Wright

Dallas ASOs win fight to keep client info off Web

DSHS wanted patient notes added to secure online server to help in audits; agencies say risk to confidentiality was too great

DAVID TAFFET  |  Staff Writer taffet@dallasvoice.com

Raeline Nobles
LEADING THE FIGHT | Raeline Nobles, executive director of AIDS Arms Inc., took the lead in negotiating with DSHS to keep AIDS service organizations from being forced to put confidential client information on an online server.

Local AIDS agencies have prevailed over a Department of State Health Services mandate to post all confidential client notes on an Internet database.

The agencies began battling the mandate after state officials claimed that ARIES, the new database, would be secure but could not provide a list of who would have access to the system to the agencies.

“That hit me like a brick,” said Don Maison, executive director of AIDS Services Dallas.

He said immigration status, incidents of domestic violence and other personal information would all become public. He sent his staff for training on the system but instructed agency employees not to enter any information.

Bret Camp, associate executive director of health and medical services at Nelson Tebedo Clinic, said, “We have information available for review. We will not be entering information in ARIES.”

Dallas County sided with local AIDS service providers. After almost a year of negotiations, the state compromised and will allow agencies to provide the data needed by the state without posting confidential notes on line.

The only objections to using the system came from Dallas.

Raeline Nobles, executive director of AIDS Arms, said all agencies funded by Ryan White Part B money in Texas would be affected.

Houston doesn’t receive this type of funding. Agencies in other parts of the state told Nobles they were too small to fight the new mandate.

That left Dallas organizations to lead the fight to protect personal information from being compromised on line.

“We were successful,” said Nobles, who led the opposition and negotiated with the state on behalf of the county and Dallas AIDS service providers.

“DSHS has come back and decided to negotiate a fair and equitable deal,” she said. “Austin has done the right thing on behalf of clients and agencies.”

The state agency told both Nobles and Maison that it needed all of the client notes to audit the agencies. They said allowing state officials to examine the agencies without traveling to the various locations across the state would save money. The state, however, pays the county to review agency records.

Greg Beets, DSHS public information coordinator for HIV/STD programs, said that the reason behind ARIES is to codify and evaluate HIV services across the state. He said confidentiality was the state’s biggest concern as well.

“The data helps provide a snapshot of what services are being provided and identify unmet service needs,” Beets said.

Beets said that the system met standards developed at a national level and a series of measures would ensure security. Those measures included limited access to the information on a need-to-know basis, security at the building in which the computer was housed and encrypted information.

Those assurances did not satisfy Dallas AIDS agencies. Nobles pointed out that from time to time information is compromised from financial institutions that spent quite a bit of money on their technology.

“If information ever got out to the public, we’d be liable,” Nobles said.

Several years ago, the state required AIDS organizations to invest millions in new computer record keeping systems. She said all of the information is currently kept on a secure computer database within the agency. That computer system is not Internet-based.

Nobles’ agency raised several hundred thousand dollars to satisfy the unfunded mandate to build their database, and, she said, Parkland spent more than $1 million on their system.

To move the information to the new state computer system would be a complete waste of that money the state required her to raise from local donors, Nobles said.

She explained she feared moving the information off the database to a state system would compromise her credibility with her agency’s donors.

“But privacy is the number one issue,” Nobles said. “We can’t build a reliable relationship with clients if they don’t believe it’s confidential.”

Maison was even more adamant.

“This agency would be in court,” Maison said. “It wouldn’t take a rocket scientist to see what this policy does to make people run from care.”

Maison said people with HIV who use public services give up quite a bit of their privacy, “But to invite the government into your daily life is not acceptable.”

Nobles said she was never arguing about the state’s right to see AIDS Arms’ records. “Any time a government public health funder needs to audit, they can do so,” she said. She said that the information the state needs is statistical information.

But, Nobles added, she couldn’t imagine what use the client notes would have been.

The state will maintain the ARIES system. Nobles said smaller agencies, especially in rural areas that could not afford their own database, might want to use it.

Maison was happy with the outcome.

“I don’t recall being on the same side as the county before,” said Maison, who has headed ASD for more than 20 years.

Camp was also pleased with the outcome. “I’m very pleased Dallas County understood the importance of client confidentiality and backed the service providers,” he said.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition August 13, 2010.

—  Kevin Thomas