9 ways to fabulize your week

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It’s a music-filled week in Dallas.

For more traditional concerts featuring gay artists, Saturday is super-busy, with Deborah Vial and Jane Doe reuniting for a concert at The Kessler Theatre (doors open at 6 p.m.). Down the road in The Cedars, Eric Himan, pictured, launches his new national tour promoting his CD Gracefully at Poor David’s Pub (doors open at 7:30 p.m.).

If you prefer dance music from a DJ, Dick’s Night Out is back at the W Hotel Ghostbar on Friday, with DJ Charlie Phresh spinning. Then on Sunday, Honey Pot celebrates its first anniversary with Summer Chill at the Dallas Eagle, with DJ Medic making some noise.

Prefer your music in showtune form? You can still try to get tickets to see The Book of Mormon, which settled into the Winspear with a Tony Award-winning score. (The musicals Kiss of the Spider Woman, Xanadu and Miss Saigon all close this weekend, so if you haven’t seen them yet, this is your last chance.)

For non-musical outings, Men on the Verge of a His-Panic Breakdown delivers the laughs at Teatro Dallas, and the irrepressible Molly Ivins spins her homespun liberalism in Red Hot Patriot at WaterTower Theatre. And Gaybingo is back at the Rose Room with a Slumber Party theme on Saturday with Drag Racer Latrice Royale in tow, and the HRC’s Fruit Bowl rolls into Richardson on Sunday.

—  Arnold Wayne Jones

Queer-centric band Eric & the Adams break up

Eric and the Adams performed their final show as a trio last night at The Hunt Club in Tulsa, Okla. where the band is based. The band has played Dallas many times and singer Eric Himan has come to town as a solo act. The last we saw of any of them was Himan opening for Jay Brannan back in December. Himan and Angel Adams‘ have both left letters on the band’s site saying their goodbyes and citing reasons the band was dissolving — going in different directions, having babies.

We’re kinda sad to see them go. The band has been overly courteous to the Dallas Voice always being open to interviews and reviews.

Good luck guys in your future endeavors and we hope that last show killed! We love all your original work but we’re just gonna go back and remember the time you covered the Beastie Boys at Sue Ellen’s. Mmmk?

—  Rich Lopez

WATCH: Brannan and Himan at The Loft

Last night’s show with Jay Brannan and Eric Himan offered a mix of oil and water. Both armed with acoustic guitars, Himan rocked the venue while Brannan soothed the almost sold-out crowd. With such a spectrum, the ovations for both were loud and blatantly appreciative.

Brannan croons like no other and he confessed onstage to being sick and vomiting the whole day prior to the show. He showed no signs of that as he sang with crystal clarity. His voice was pristine and you almost think you’re listening to a CD. He performed a healthy set also, for being so sick. “Housewife” may be his most popular song and it was well-received, but I’d have to say “Beautifully” and “Charleston,” his cover of a friend’s song, were fantastic highlights. He captured the exquisiteness of each melody nicely in both. Although his work is on the mellower side, at times the set needed a slight jolt and the ballads began to run into each other. Brannan was never tepid, but came oh-so close.

On a side note, he talked about how he loved returning to Texas as he can find really good Mexican food here. But when he cited Pappasito’s as his taco destination, we nearly choked on the ice in our drinks.

Himan, on the other hand, killed his set. With a playlist of about six songs, he took us up and down with the stirring “Protest Song” to a decent cover of Journey’s “Faithfully.” He’s a lot grittier live than he is recorded and it was a revelation. Where Brannan’s set was like a zen meditation, Himan’s bit was bombastic.

Last night was one of those special shows where the headliner met expectations nicely and the opener left a strong and exciting impression.

—  Rich Lopez

Jay Brannan and Eric Himan perform tonight at The Loft

A double-dose of sexy

Indie rocker Jay Brannan returns to Dallas tonight. Not only might he remind you of our national anthem, Brannan isn’t half-bad when it comes to lyrics. Quirky, original and at times even delightful. With an acoustic set, The Loft is the ideal setting for his music as it was last year. Fellow gay musician Eric Himan joins the bill tonight. He’s not doing too bad himself. He just released his piano-based solo album Out With the Old and hits the pavement pretty often according to his Twitter and Facebook feeds.

These boys are working it for all they can and if past shows say anything, tonight should be an acoustic set of awesome.

DEETS: The Loft, 1135 S. Lamar St.. Doors at 7:30. $17. GilleysMusic.com

—  Rich Lopez

GIVEAWAY: We have two pairs of tix to Jay Brannan and Eric Himan on Tuesday

The Loft has given us two pairs of tickets to Jay Brannan’s show on Tuesday to give away. It’s a double-bill of sexy. Not only does the pretty-faced indie folkster headline, the hunky and tatted Eric Himan, below, opens the show with his brand of folk-pop. Kudos to The Loft peeps for booking a perfectly matched pair of gay musicians.

E-mail us here by noon Monday with your first and last name and “I wanna get folked up” in the subject line for your chance to win. Good luck!

—  Rich Lopez

Tickling ivories

Eric Himan trades his guitar for a piano to revisit his musical catalog

RICH LOPEZ  | Staff Writer lopez@dallasvoice.com

3 out of 5 stars
OUT WITH THE OLD
Eric Himan
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Proof that Eric Himan has an astounding amount of determination is found in his new CD, Out with the Old. Himan challenged himself to learn the piano and then reinterpreted some of his own tunes into an altogether different sound on this collection of 12 songs — 11 covers of his own stuff and one new track. The results are a valiant effort that, even with some lulls, comes out on top.

He recorded the album live, though not in front of an audience. Instead, these takes were captured at his piano instructor’s home. This approach works nicely and conveys a strange intimacy, though sometimes he would have benefited from adjusted levels of his voice and piano.

Opening with “Until the Road Unwinds,” Himan gives no hint that he’s a piano novice. He must have magic hands because his work here is sublime. The ballad starts off the CD slowly, but opens up the mind and ear quickly to his new sound. The song itself holds up well in this interpretation, but immediately we hear that while Himan can play nicely, he doesn’t show off. The CD is a bold move, but Himan knows he isn’t Billy Joel — yet. Although if that’s the direction he’s headed it, it’s not a bad one.

Eric Himan
TOTALLY VERSATILE | Tulsa-based Eric Himan makes a bold move by stepping away from the guitar to show off his new piano skills in ‘Out with the Old.’

Then “White Horse” happens. Despite showing shades of Jerry Lee Lewis, Himan misses here, and badly. The lyrics feel rushed as if he’s squeezing in words to fit the rhythm. On its own, the song is the equivalent of ill-fitting shoes, losing the rockabilly fun from its original form. Himan needs to master the pace between the piano and his faster songs.

But on his slower tunes and ballads, the music shines. “Clyde” plays with tenderness and he works the keys in both complex and moody fashions. Then we start hearing him stretching out his vocal runs as if the new translation is setting him free. He’s not only putting his piano playing to the test, but his voice as well.

This continues on “Kinda Hard.” He can handle the instrument for these steadier tunes but his earnestness is etched into the song. When he sings the line, I mean nothing to you, nothing sounded more painful. “One Less Person” and “One Night Stand” fare the same beautiful fate with share the right delicacy and proper musical approach. You could say this album is a bit narcissistic if he just wants to show off what he’s learned, but if it’s gonna sound like this all the time, then by all means, show off.

The original track “Gonna Make it Work,” somehow misses all the marks. Himan starts intently but he begins to ramble. The song builds to an uneven chorus. Himan has a uniquely high-pitched voice but he needed to downshift registers here — either that or slow the song down.

It’s unfortunate to end on a sloppy note, because up to this point, the albums play with nice cohesion regardless of its couple of stumbles. But props to Himan for trying something new — at the very least, it keeps him interesting, and listeners interested.

This article appeared in the Dallas Voice print edition November 12, 2010.

—  Michael Stephens

Eric and the Adams debut new music video

Although Eric and the Adams isn’t local, they stop by to play Sue Ellen’s often enough for us to give them some love like we did here. The Okie band debuted their first music video on JabberboxTV this week.

And who isn’t loving gay singer Eric Himan’s The Office look? But he’s not as innocent as you might think. But I’m totally digging the vid.

—  Rich Lopez