“Hollywood and DeVine” act auction to benefit Gulf Coast Archive

Hooray for Hollywood! and hooray for LGBT history! The two collide on Sunday, February 19, when the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum of LGBT History presents “Hollywood & DeVine Broadway Lights, & Television Sets Auction and Sale.” (Say that three times fast.)

Up for auction will be a stunning collection of Hollywood memorabilia, much of it left to the archive by the late Larry Lingle, who for years owned the Lobo Bookstore on Westheimer. Included in the auction are a rare collection of posters advertising the musical Mame with Judy Garland (Judy never stared in Mame, the posters were mock-ups made when the gay-icon was being considered for the titular role), sheet music, vinyl records, art, photographs, Star Trek memorabilia and more.

On display during the auction will be the historic bar tops from Mary’s Naturally, the iconic Westheimer gay bar that closed in 2009. GCAM is currently working to restore the bar tops. This will be the public’s first opportunity to view the effort.

Judy Reeves, who is curating the auction (and donated the Star Trek memorabilia), told OutSmart Magaine that the auction is needed to provide more space for GCAM’s collection and to raise funds for on-going expenses. “We are planning to give that project some priority with some of these funds. There is always the ongoing—the supplies for hanging exhibits, those frames and nails, etc. It can add up. It gets expensive after a while.”

“Hollywood & DeVine Broadway Lights, & Television Sets Auction and Sale” takes the stage at 2 pm this Sunday at the GLBT Cultural Center (401 Branard).

—  admin

“Spectacular Damage” at Gulf Coast Archive puts human face on AIDS crisis

"Joe" - one of the paintings from "Spectacular Damage"

The nude models for Jack Dorlan’s Spectacular Damage show are not people one typically wishes to see naked, and that’s the point. The models, all men living with HIV, carry the lumps and scars of the virus and its treatments with dignity, defiance and a quiet longing that leaps from the canvas.

Painting in a style immediately reminiscent of the late Lucian Freud, Dorlan’s brutally honest brush makes no attempt to beautify the reality of his subject’s lives. As a result the very real, and “spectacular,” beauty of these damaged bodies shines through.

“These paintings examine the contemporary human body as it is affected by HIV treatment,” explains Doran. “Due to the effects of HIV and the medications required to manage the virus, the human body has taken on new characteristics that alter the human form in a way that has never before been seen in the history of mankind. As HIV research and treatments improve, these characteristics will cease to be a common trait among those living with HIV. These bodies are temporary.”

Spectacular Damage is presented by the Gulf Coast Archives and Museum at the GLBT Cultural Center (401 Branard) Sunday, January 8, from 3-5 pm. Admissions is free. Fifty percent of the proceeds from the sale of prints of the collection’s paintings goes to assist the models in paying for HIV treatments and medications.

—  admin

Houston ARCH seeks public submissions for new logo

Houston ARCH proposed logos

History relies on historians, whether the formal history of the academic or the informal history of grandpa’s stories, someone must tell the tale for the story to live on. The straight world has many formal institutions designed to maintain its story, from museums to archives to oral history projects the stories of straight people are well documented and preserved.

Queer history, on the other hand, is far more fragile. As a community we have a habit of separating ourselves by generations and the documents of our recent past, the fliers, t-shirts and pamphlets, are often seen as ephemeral trash, rather than important historical documents.

Several institutions have been created to try to preserve that history, including the Botts Archive, the Gulf Coast Archive, and archives at the University of Houston, Rice University and the Transgender Foundation of America. These desperate efforts have joined together to form the Houston Area Rainbow Collective History (Houston ARCH), a coordinated effort to preserve and document LGBT History in Houston.

Of course, any great organization needs a great logo, and that’s where Houston ARCH is reaching out to the public for help. Through January 5 you can submit your design via e-mail to billyhoya@billyhoya.info. Designs must contain the name “Houston ARCH,” and may spell out the acronym, also designs should be be scalable, work both in color and black and white, and be suitable for print and online reproduction. Designers should take care that their submissions are not confusable with logo’s of similarly named organizations.

So far only two proposals have been submitted and loaded to the Houston ARCH website for comment. Final voting for the design will take place January 25 at the regular Houston ARCH meeting.

—  admin

Movie Monday: ‘Warrior’ in wide release

Here’s the beef

There are worse ways to spend two hours in a movie theater than watching hulking, half-naked man-meat wail on each other — in fact, it’s hard to imagine a better way. That’s at least part of the appeal of Warrior.

Set in the world of mixed martial arts, it’s a fiction film (it’s from Gavin O’Connor, the director of Miracle, about the real-life 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team) about two estranged brothers who face off for the ultimate glory: One (Joel Edgerton), a family man in financial straights, the other (Tom Hardy), a troubled Gulf War veteran with something to prove. If that sounds cliched, just try watching it.

No really, do — because, as predictable and manipulative as Warrior is, it’s also damned entertaining, in the way only the hokiest of sports movies can be. I grew up in a sports household, so have long held a soft spot for movies like Million Dollar Baby, Rocky III and The Fighter, all of which this resembles more than passingly.

Read the entire review here.

DEETS: Starring Tom Hardy, Joel Edgerton. 139 minutes. PG-13. Three stars.

—  Rich Lopez

Another oil rig blows up in the Gulf of Mexico

Not again… (CNN):

An oil production platform has exploded 80 miles off the coast of Louisiana, with 12 people overboard and one missing, the Coast Guard said Thursday morning.

…U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer Bill Colclough tells CNN that 12 people from the production platform are in water immersion suits as they await rescue.

Colclough told CNN there are reports the production platform is still on fire.

“We don’t know what caused the rig to catch on fire,” he told CNN, noting the incident is under investigation.

Asked about concerns regarding oil leaks or pollution, Colclough said “there are reports the rig was not actively producing any product, so we don’t know if there’s any risk of pollution.”

WAFB in Louisiana reports:

The rig is owned by Mariner Energy, which is based in Houston, and is in water about 2,500 feet deep.

Pam’s House Blend – Front Page

—  John Wright